healthcare | WAMC

healthcare

Book cover for "Trans Medicine"
NYU Press / NYU Press

This past April, Arkansas became the first state to ban gender-affirming care for transgender minors. Tennessee followed suit more recently, with over 100 other anti-trans bills awaiting action in state legislatures from Maine to Texas.

Unsurprisingly, such activity has left doctors who work with this population asking questions: “how do I honor my medical standards of care? And how do I not abandon my patients?” Yet there is a more fundamental question that is being passed over here: how has gender come to be defined by doctors in the first place?

In "Trans Medicine: The Emergence and Practice of Treating Gender," the traditional focus of trans monographs shifts dramatically. Rather than spotlighting the trans experience, medical sociologist stef shuster trains their attention on the medical community itself, and in the process seeks to answer fundamental questions.

Book cover for "The Premonition" by Michael Lewis
Norton / Norton

Bestselling author Michael Lewis’s new book, “The Premonition: A Pandemic Story,” is a non-fiction thriller that pits a band of medical visionaries against the wall of ignorance that was the official response of the Trump administration to the COVID-19 outbreak.

Book cover for "Letter To a Young Female Physician"
W. W. Norton & Company

In 2017, Dr. Suzanne Koven published an essay describing the challenges faced by female physicians, including her own personal struggle with "imposter syndrome"―a long-held secret belief that she was not smart enough or good enough to be a “real” doctor. Accessed by thousands of readers around the world, Koven’s “Letter to a Young Female Physician” has evolved into a new book - a reflection on her career in medicine.

With warmth, clarity, and wisdom, "Letter to a Young Female Physician" reveals a woman forging her authentic identity in a modern landscape that is as overwhelming and confusing as it is exhilarating in its possibilities.

U.S. Senator Mazie Hirono is the first Asian American woman and the only immigrant currently serving in the U.S. Senate.

In her new book, "Heart of Fire," Senator Hirono chronicles her evolution from a dogged yet soft-spoken public servant into the fiery critic and advocate we know her as today. Hers is a uniquely American story, of immigrating to a new country in search of a better life and then dedicating her own life to advocating for her constituents.

Personal stories explain her stance on healthcare, immigration, family separation, and education—and readers are given fly-on-the-wall access to Congress, where Senator Hirono reveals how the governing body functioned before and after the Trump administration came to power.

Book cover for "Women in White Coats'
Park Row

Medical journalist Olivia Campbell joins us this morning to discuss her new book, "Women in White Coats," the little-known true story of three pioneering Victorian women who fought to become the first women doctors, revolutionizing healthcare forever.

Olivia Campbell is a journalist and author specializing in medicine and women; her work has appeared in The Guardian, The Washington Post, and New York Magazine, among others.

Americans care about their health. Americans pay lots of money in hopes of maintaining their health. So why are Americans so unhealthy?

The reason is simple: as a country, the United States overinvests in medical care at the expense of the social, economic, and cultural forces that produce health.

The authors are Michael Stein, Professor and Chair of Health Law, Policy and Management of the School of Public Health at Boston University and Sandro Galea, Robert A. Knox Professor and Dean of the School of Public Health at Boston University.

Michael Stein joined us.

A University of Pittsburgh geriatric medical expert is giving a virtual talk for Berkshire Community College today. She says the elderly face outsized inequities in the American healthcare system.

Used with Permission- Beacon Press & Rosemary Day / Beacon Press

Rosemarie Day is the former deputy director and chief operating officer of the Massachusetts Health Connector—the model for the Affordable Care Act. She will tell us about the new book: Marching Toward Coverage: How Women Can Lead the Fight for Universal Healthcare.

Medical insurance is complicated and, like virtually everything in American public life these days, has been politicized and in the process made still more confusing. Yet the present collection of crises—a pandemic, the challenge of accessing quality medical care, unemployment and its attendant loss of health insurance—has made clear more than any other moment in modern memory the importance of universal coverage.

Add to this the fact that women are responsible for up to 80% of healthcare decisions for their families. Day has written a primer specifically for women on the ins and outs of medical insurance, with the objective of transforming our healthcare system using feminism as the lens and women as the drivers.

Albany Medical Center sign
Lucas Willard / WAMC

A recent webinar brought together leaders of three Capital Region hospitals to look back on the last few months during the pandemic and to look ahead to a changed way of doing business.

Renowned radio host Diane Rehm joins us this week to discuss her new book, “When My Time Comes,” which addresses the urgent, hotly contested cause of the Right-to-Die movement, of which she is one of the most inspiring champions.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Workers at two financially struggling care facilities in Albany County say they have avoided a strike and reached a deal with the facilities’ prospective owners.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Update: Workers at two financially struggling care facilities in Albany County say they are delaying a strike. 1199SEIU said Jan. 17 that the prospective buyer of Good Samaritan Nursing Home and Kenwood Manor in Delmar has requested an extension in bankruptcy court and will bargain with the union. The Lutheran Care Network is in the process of declaring bankruptcy and selling the facilities. Fearing the loss of wages and benefits, workers had planned a three-day strike starting January 24. About sixty union members work at the facilities.

Founded in 2010 in Kingston, New York by a small group of artists-activists, doctors and a dentist, O+ is now a national nonprofit working in cities around the country.

The group builds long-term relationships between creatives and health and wellness providers to help strengthen local communities. Their year-round efforts culminate in one-day and weekend-long celebrations, during which underinsured artists and musicians create and perform in exchange for a variety of services donated by doctors, dentists and complementary care providers.

Dance-punk band !!! (Chk Chk Chk) will play the 10th annual O+ Kingston festival of art, music and wellness beginning October 11-13 along with folk-rocker Elvis Perkins, cabaret-punk band The World/Inferno Friendship Society, Tall Juan, neo-soul band Lady Moon & The Eclipse and 40 more solo artists, bands and ensembles representing a wide cross-section of musical genres and styles.

This morning we are joined by O+ Executive Director Joe Concra, RN and Artists’ Clinic Director Shannon Donnell, and co-chair of the O+ Kingston music committee Mike Amari.

Good Samaritan Nursing Home and Kenwood Manor on Rockefeller Road in Delmar
WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Employees at a nursing home in Albany County have been notified their health care benefits will be terminated in less than 30 days.

“The Great Society,” the sequel to Robert Schenkkan's 2014 Tony-winning epic “All the Way,” began its Broadway run at the Vivian Beaumont Theater on September 6. Bill Rauch, who helmed "All the Way," also directs the new work which officially opens on October 1 for a limited run through November 30. Brian Cox stars in the production as President Lyndon Baines Johnson.

Capturing Lyndon B. Johnson's passionate and aggressive attempts to build a great society for all, the new play follows his epic triumph in a landslide election to the agonizing decision not to run for re-election just three years later.

Senator James Tedisco and Assemblyman Angelo Santabarbara
Dave Lucas / WAMC

The New York State Attorney General’s office is now investigating the collapse of a hospital retirement fund in Schenectady. Two state lawmakers have also filed legislation intended to get answers.

Signs on a car outside a Saratoga Springs Planning Board meeting
Lucas Willard / WAMC

Residents who live near a proposed expansion at Saratoga Hospital remain opposed to the construction of a new medical office building. WAMC’s Southern Adirondack Bureau Chief Lucas Willard attended a packed public meeting Thursday night.

Jonathan M. Metzl is the Frederick B. Rentschler II professor of sociology and psychiatry at Vanderbilt University and director of its Center for Medicine, Health, and Society. He is the author of several books and a prominent expert on gun violence and mental illness.

Founded in 2001, the Vassar Haiti Project engages students in a life-changing, experiential education in global citizenship, promotes Haitian art, and fosters sustainable development in Haiti. In addition to the purchase and sale of original Haitian art, VHP’s contributions are guided by six initiatives: education, healthcare, reforestation, clean water access, women’s empowerment, and art.

The Vassar Haiti Project’s 7th annual Art and Soul gala fundraiser will be held on Thursday, April 25, at the Vassar College Alumnae House.

This year, the Vassar Haiti Project honors Robert M. Morgenthau and Lucinda Franks for their extraordinary achievements in the fields of international social justice and literature.

We welcome Vassar Haiti Project Co-founders Andrew and Lila Meade along with Lucinda Franks.

4/2/19 Panel

Apr 2, 2019

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Former Times Union Associate Editor Mike Spain, The Empire Report’s J.P. Miller, Dean of International Studies at Bard College and Academic Director of the Bard Globalization and International Affairs program James Ketterer, and lobbyist and political consultant Libby Post.

Christie Watson was a registered nurse for twenty years before writing full time. Her first novel, "Tiny Sunbirds Far Away," won the Costa First Novel Award and her second novel, "Where Women Are Kings," was also published to international critical acclaim.

In "The Language of Kindness: A Nurse's Story," she opens the doors of the hospital and shares its secrets. She takes us by her side down hospital corridors to visit the wards and meet her unforgettable patients.

Josh Landes / WAMC

Time is running short for Massachusetts residents to enroll in health insurance plans for next year.

Dr. Willie Parker Is a Christian reproductive justice advocate. Focusing on populations in need, Dr. Willie Parker travels primarily the Deep South providing abortions and other health services. His Book "Life's Work: A Moral Argument For Choice" focuses on violence against women, sexual assault, and reproductive rights and justice through advocacy and provision of contraceptive and abortion services.

Dr. Willie Parker will be speaking at the Women's Leadership Circle Luncheon for Upper Hudson Planned Parenthood, Thursday 9/27 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Wolferts Roost Country Club.

Blair Horner: A Buried Health Treasure In NYS

Sep 10, 2018

The crisis in the cost of medicines in America is well-known.  Americans spend more on prescription drugs — average costs are about $1,100 per person per year — than spent anywhere else in the world.  And the prices can be staggeringly high.  For example, cancer drugs in the U.S. routinely cost $10,000 a month.  

Samuel Harrington, MD, an honors graduate of Harvard College and the University of Wisconsin Medical School, concentrated his clinical practice at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, DC. There he served as a medical staff leader, a trustee, and as Sibley's representative to the Johns Hopkins Quality and Safety Board Committee. This work and his service on the board of trustees of a nonprofit hospice brought Dr. Harrington into the discussion of end-of-life medical care.

Most people say they would like to die quietly at home. But overly aggressive medical advice, coupled with an unrealistic sense of invincibility or overconfidence in our health-care system, results in the majority of elderly patients misguidedly dying in institutions. Many undergo painful procedures instead of having the better and more peaceful death they deserve.

Dr. Harrington's new book "At Peace: Choosing a Good Death After a Long Life" outlines specific active and passive steps that older patients and their health-care proxies can take to ensure loved ones live their last days comfortably at home and/or in hospice when further aggressive care is inappropriate.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

A Capital Region hospital and healthcare network will remain independent after a two-year review.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences joins us to talk about their new innitiative, “The Collaboratory.”

Located in Albany’s South End, this space will be used by both the College and Trinity Alliance and serve as the home base for the REACH program. The purpose of this program is to engage, empower, and activate Medicaid and Medicaid-eligible residents of the South End and nearby neighborhoods to make consistent use of preventative health care and wellness systems.

Beyond serving this need, the Collaboratory will host classes for both ACPHS students as well as for community residents. The space will also be available for community group meetings, and we expect to add more services in the years to come. Below is list of suggested questions to help guide the discussion.

We welcome ACPHS President, Dr. Greg Dewey and Dr. Colleen McLaughlin. Colleen is a professor at the College and also serves as the Chair of their Department of Population Health Sciences.

In a 2 to 1 vote, nurses at Albany Medical Center have chosen to unionize.

 

The hospital said in a release early Saturday morning that in a secret ballot election conducted by the National Labor Relations Board, Albany Med nurses voted to accept representation by the New York State Nurses Association for purposes of collective bargaining. 

Best-Selling author Barbara Ehrenreich, after her own battle with cancer, is now against the preventative care that is supposed to prolong life and guarantee health. It may sound suicidal, but Ehrenreich claims most of the medical tests she is urged to take fall short of the “evidence based” standard she requires to go to the hospital and undergo unpleasant and intrusive procedures.

In her new book, "Natural Causes: An Epidemic Of Wellness, The Certainty Of Dying, And Our Illusion Of Control," Barbara Ehrenreich tackles the politics of women’s health care, watching average Americans become fierce advocates for pointless diets, unnecessary procedures and checkups, and an unhealthy amount of exercise without the full knowledge of how flimsy the science behind those practices really is. Is control over our bodies even possible?

The feminist icon & author of "Nickel and Dimed" holds a degree in cellular immunology and uses it to great effect as she topples the institutions & customs that guide our attempts at living long, healthy lives.

Even with Congress’s failure to officially repeal the Affordable Care Act, our healthcare system is desperately broken. No proposed reforms have addressed the fact that the cost of medical care in the U.S. has grown far beyond what most people can afford, and pharmaceutical giant CVS’s recent acquisition of Aetna only underscores what Americans have known for years: Our healthcare system is now in the money-making business and not the healing one.

As a Harvard-trained medical doctor and veteran journalist, first with the New York Times and now as editor-in-chief of Kaiser Health News, Dr. Elisabeth Rosenthal has witnessed firsthand how healthcare has become a business. Her new book is: "An American Sickness: How Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back."

Pages