harlem

Jon Batiste
Sasha Isreal

On Sunday, June 24th Jon Batiste will perform with The Dap-Kings at the Freihofer’s Saratoga Jazz Festival at SPAC.

Batiste was born into a musical family in Louisiana, he studied at Julliard, attended the Skidmore Jazz Institute, his band, Stay Human, is the house band for The Late Show with Stephen Colbert -- and he’s the Co-Artistic Director at-large for the National Jazz Museum in Harlem.

"Down the Up Staircase" tells the story of one Harlem family across three generations, connecting its journey to the historical and social forces that transformed Harlem over the past century.

Bruce D. Haynes and Syma Solovitch capture the tides of change that pushed blacks forward through the twentieth century as well as the many forces that ravaged black communities, including Haynes's own.

As an authority on race and urban communities, Haynes brings unique sociological insights to the American mobility saga and the tenuous nature of status and success among the black middle class. Bruce Haynes joins us.

Veteran New York City songwriter Garland Jeffreys has done it all. His discography stretches back to the 1960s, when he met Lou Reed before The Velvet Underground and played at countless Manhattan nightclubs.

He's been called an edgy urban poet, the sound of New York, a confessional singer-songwriter and an explorer of the links between rock, race and rebellion. His Atlantic Records version of "Wild in the Streets" has become an anthem for skaters, and he's been featured in Martin Scorsese's documentary on blues music.

He has just released his latest album, 14 Steps To Harlem, his third in six years. He will be at The Linda - WAMC's Performing Arts Studio in Albany, NY on Saturday night.

    Ten years ago, literary scholar Carla Kaplan released an acclaimed edition of the letters of Zora Neale Hurston.

In the course of researching Hurston's life, Kaplan became curious about the white women who were in Harlem in the same period as Hurston, women who risked family exile and social ostracism to be part of the artistic and political movements of the Harlem Renaissance.

Now, Kaplan has published a cultural history of those women called Miss Anne in Harlem: The White Women of the Black Renaissance. Carla Kaplan is an award-winning professor and writer who holds the Stanton and Elisabeth Davis Distinguished Professorship in American Literature at Northeastern University. She will be speaking at Odyssey Bookshop in South Hadley tomorrow night.