Hampshire College

A white man with a neat goatee stands at a podium
John Courtmanche / Hampshire College

Documentarian Ken Burns made his first film as a student at Hampshire College in 1975. He’s gone on to make dozens of critically acclaimed examinations of American history, ranging from jazz and baseball to the Vietnam War and country music. Now, Burns has attached his name to his alma mater’s new fundraising effort, which he says is vital to its survival. Burns spoke with WAMC about the experimental college’s attempt to raise $60 million over the next five years, and his experience at Hampshire.

Hampshire College has been reaccredited by the New England Commission of Higher Education.

A man stands behind a podium with a Hampshire College logo in a wooden structure
Josh Landes / WAMC

Troubled Hampshire College announced today it will transform its organization and curriculum to address contemporary global challenges.

A man stands behind a podium with a Hampshire College logo in a wooden structure
Josh Landes / WAMC

Over the last year, Hampshire College has faced financial uncertainty and abrupt leadership transitions. This week, the private liberal arts school in Amherst, Massachusetts opened its doors to an incoming class of just 13 after its board voted to not accept a full roster of students in January. New college president Ed Wingenbach — who replaced Miriam “Mim” Nelson after her resignation in April — spoke to WAMC about what he told the college community at its first gathering of the school year, as well as his response to emails between the college and UMass about a possible merger that the Daily Hampshire Gazette reported on.

The Hampshire College community is reacting after the appointment of a new president to lead the struggling campus.

A man stands behind a podium with a Hampshire College logo in a wooden structure
Josh Landes / WAMC

Hampshire College introduced its new president today, at a critical moment in the college’s history.

Hampshire College has announced its new president after a tumultuous year.

On Friday, Hampshire College President Miriam “Mim” Nelson abruptly resigned in the midst of ongoing controversy over her leadership of the struggling private liberal arts college. The news is complicated for the Amherst, Massachusetts college’s teachers, who were facing an uncertain future of a greatly restricted Fall 2019 incoming class and layoffs related to the drop in enrollment. Salman Hameed, a Charles Taylor chair and associate professor of integrated science and humanity at Hampshire, is also a media liaison for the college’s chapter of the American Association of University Professors. He tells WAMC Berkshire Bureau Chief Josh Landes that his colleagues are still trying to understand what to make of Nelson’s exit and the presidency of interim leader Ken Rosenthal.

Hampshire College

On Friday, the president of Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts abruptly resigned amid financial turmoil and protest on campus.

Miriam Nelson
WAMC

After the sudden resignation of President Miriam Nelson, Hampshire College has appointed an interim leader for the struggling liberal arts college.

With the college facing an uncertain future, the chair of Hampshire College’s board of trustees has resigned.

Salman Hameed is a Charles Taylor chair and associate professor of integrated science and humanity at Hampshire College. He’s acting as a media liaison for the college’s chapter of the American Association of University Professors. Hampshire is now undergoing layoffs following a series of decisions from the school’s leadership to not accept a full incoming class for Fall 2019. The moves come due to declining enrollment and concerns around the college’s future. Hampshire is seeking a financial partner. WAMC spoke with Hameed about life during layoffs and the faculty’s attempted vote of no confidence in Hampshire president Miriam Nelson.

Hampshire College President Miriam Nelson.
Hampshire College

Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts is charting an uncertain course, facing declining enrollment and an unstable financial future. President Miriam Nelson has found herself in the heart of controversy. After a board vote to only accept a limited incoming class for Fall 2019, the college began layoffs that could put 30 to 50 percent of the faculty and staff out of work. Those projections are based on the fact that the college’s faculty is pegged to the number of students at the college – which will now face a precipitous decline due to the board’s vote. Following student and alumni protest and an attempted vote of no confidence from the faculty on Wednesday, Nelson spoke with WAMC Thursday.

The Hampshire College logo.
Hampshire College

Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts has announced it will lay off nine employees from its Admissions and Advancement offices.

The Hampshire College logo.
Hampshire College

With layoffs looming, faculty members at Hampshire College are rallying together.

Josh Landes / WAMC

On Friday, Hampshire College’s Board of Trustees voted to not accept a full class for the Fall 2019 semester. The decision followed nearly three tense weeks of confusion among the college’s students, faculty, staff, and alumni after the move was proposed by President Miriam Nelson. Kim Saal is the vice chair of Hampshire’s board. An alumnus himself, he was a part of Hampshire’s first class in 1970. WAMC spoke to Saal about Friday’s vote, the events that led up to it, and the controversy left in its wake.

Josh Landes / WAMC

As Hampshire College grapples with its financial future, its student body is speaking out.

Hampshire College

A private liberal arts college in Western Massachusetts is restricting admissions for the 2019-2020 school year.

       A small innovative four-year college in western Massachusetts has publicly acknowledged facing stiff headwinds as it charts a course into a second half-century.

Hampshire College President Miriam Nelson.
Hampshire College

    Miriam Nelson, a health and nutrition scholar, scientist, higher education administrator, and government policy advisor, has been chosen as the next president of Hampshire College.

WAMC

Given the size and financial strength of some large college and universities in the US, it came as a bit of a surprise that a small, liberal arts college in western Massachusetts is the first institution in the country to go 100 percent solar.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk to the college president who got this project rolling.

WAMC

     Hampshire College is on its way to becoming 100 percent solar for the electricity used on campus.  It is believed to be a first for a residential college anywhere in the United States.

AIA

   The newest building on a western Massachusetts college campus has earned a national award for its environmentally sound design.

The American flag was raised at Hampshire College this morning, two weeks after the removal of the Stars and Stripes drew national attention, sharp criticism and protests outside the campus of the small liberal arts school in Amherst.

Hampshire College

The American flag was raised at Hampshire College this morning, two weeks after the removal of the Stars and Stripes drew national attention, sharp criticism and protests outside the campus of the small liberal arts school in Amherst. 

Hampshire College

The Massachusetts college that drew nationwide criticism when it stopped flying the U.S. flag on campus following the presidential election says Old Glory is back up. 

WAMC

  Hampshire College has begun constructing the largest campus solar power array in New England. It is an ambitious project that is part of the small liberal arts college’s plan to someday have a carbon-neutral campus.

WAMC

A ribbon-cutting ceremony today marked the opening of the first new building on the Hampshire College campus in nearly three decades. But it is no ordinary building. It was designed and built to achieve the most advanced environmentally sound building standard in the world.

A photo of Hampshire College Professor Michael Klare
Hampshire College

The proliferation of violent conflicts and social upheaval around the world is likely to increase as a result of climate change. That is the view of Michael Klare, Five College Professor of Peace and World Security Studies at Hampshire College. 

Klare, who has written widely on U.S. military policy, is delivering a special lecture today on war and peace in the climate change era.  

     His lecture at 4:30 this afternoon at Hampshire College’s Franklin Patterson Hall is sponsored by the Five College Consortium.

Hampshire College

Students, faculty and staff at Hampshire College in Amherst are able to move around campus a bit faster thanks to a recent speed limit change. But, it wasn’t done to help students get to class on time.

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