globalism | WAMC

globalism

Retired Admiral James Stavridis and author Elliot Ackerman join us this morning to discuss their new book: "2034: A Novel of the Next World War."

Admiral Stavridis spent more than 30 years in the U.S. Navy, rising to the rank of four-star admiral and who served as the Supreme Allied Commander at NATO. Elliot Ackerman is the author of several novels, including "Dark at the Crossing," which was a finalist for the National Book Award, and most recently, "Waiting for Eden."

They are here to discuss what it is like writing a novel on the next world war, the lessons it offers national security professionals and policymakers, and key points in the backstory that precipitated the march to this fictional but highly realistic portrayal of the next world war.

Admiral James Stavridis and Elliot Ackerman join us.

We live in a global era, in which what happens thousands of miles away has the ability to affect our lives. This time, it is Covid-19, which originated in a Chinese city many had never heard of but has spread to the corners of the earth. Next time it could be another infectious disease from somewhere else.

This is the new normal of the 21st century. We are connected to this world in all sorts of ways. So, we need to better understand it, both its promise and its threats, in order to make informed choices, be it as students, citizens, voters, parents, employees, or investors. The new book, "The World: A Brief Introduction," is designed to provide readers with the essential background and building blocks they need to make sense of this complicated and interconnected world.

Dr. Richard Haass is president of the Council on Foreign Relations. He served as the senior Middle East adviser to President George H. W. Bush, as director of the Policy Planning Staff under Secretary of State Colin Powell, and as the U.S. envoy to both the Cyprus and Northern Ireland peace talks.

As humanity marches on, causing mass extinctions and destabilizing the climate, the future of Earth will very much reflect the stories that Homo sapiens decides to jettison or accept today into our collective identity. At this pivotal moment in history, the most important story we can be telling ourselves is that humans are not inherently destructive.

In "Changing Tides" Alejandro Frid tackles the big questions: who, or what, represents our essential selves, and what stories might allow us to shift the collective psyche of industrial civilization in time to avert the worst of the climate and biodiversity crises?

Richard A. Clarke served for thirty years in national security policy roles in the US Government, first in the Pentagon, then the State Department, and finally for an unprecedented decade of continuous service for three Presidents in the White House.

In the White House National Security Council for President Bush (41), Clinton, and Bush (43) he served as Special Assistant to the President for Global Affairs, National Coordinator for Security and Counter-terrorism (“Terrorism Czar’), and Special Advisor for Cyberspace (the first “Cyber Czar”).

His latest book, co-authored by Robert Knake is "The Fifth Domain: Defending Our Country, Our Companies, and Ourselves in the Age of Cyber Threats."

All over the world, diplomacy is under threat. Diplomats used to handle sensitive international negotiations, but increasingly, incendiary Tweets and bombastic public statements are posing a threat to foreign relations.

In their new book, "The Art of Diplomacy," the former US ambassador to Canada, Bruce Heyman, and his partner, Vicki Heyman, spell out why diplomacy and diplomats matter, especially in today’s turbulent times.

The Heyman’s arrived in Canada intent on representing American interests, but they quickly learned that to do so meant representing the shared interests of all citizens—no matter what side of the 49th parallel they happened to live on.

From the bestselling author of “A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius,” “The Circle,” “A Hologram for the King,” and “What Is the What” comes a taut, suspenseful story of two visitors’ role in a nation’s fragile peace. Dave Eggers’ latest is “The Parade: A Novel.”

"In Putin’s Footsteps: Searching for the Soul of an Empire Across Russia's Eleven Time Zones" is Nina Khrushcheva and Jeffrey Tayler’s unique combination of travelogue, current affairs, and history, showing how Russia’s dimensions have shaped its identity and culture through the decades.

With exclusive insider status as Nikita Khrushchev’s great grand-daughter, and an ex-pat living and reporting on Russia and the Soviet Union since 1993, Nina Khrushcheva and Jeffrey Tayler offer a poignant exploration of the largest country on earth through their recreation of Vladimir Putin’s fabled New Year’s Eve speech planned across all eleven time zones.

In February 2013, the arch-conservative Pope Benedict XVI made a startling announcement: he would resign, making him the first pope to willingly vacate his office in over 700 years. Reeling from the news, the College of Cardinals rushed to Rome to congregate in the Sistine Chapel to pick his successor. Their unlikely choice? Francis, the first non-European pope in 1,200 years, a one time tango club bouncer, a passionate soccer fan, a man with the common touch.

Why did Benedict walk away at the height of power, knowing his successor might be someone whose views might undo his legacy? Having immersed himself in these men's lives to write the screenplay for the upcoming motion picture The Pope, Anthony McCarten weaves their stories into one gripping narrative. The Pope is soon to be a major motion picture starring Anthony Hopkins and Jonathan Pryce.

Anthony McCarten is a novelist, playwright, television writer, and filmmaker. He is two time Academy-Award nominated screenwriter for writing the biographical films - "The Theory of Everything" and "The Darkest Hour." He most recently wrote the film "Bohemian Rhapsody" – which has been nominated for an Oscar this year for Best Picture.

Ian Bremmer is the president and founder of Eurasia Group, the leading global political risk research and consulting firm.

Those who championed globalization once promised a world of winners, one in which free trade would lift all the world's boats, and extremes of left and right would give way to universally embraced liberal values. The past few years have shattered this fantasy, as those who've paid the price for globalism's gains have turned to populist and nationalist politicians to express fury at the political, media, and corporate elites they blame for their losses.

In his new book, "Us vs. Them: The Failure of Globalism," Bremmer writes that globalism creates plenty of both winners and losers, and those who've missed out want to set things right.

The 17th Annual Underground Railroad History Project’s public convention is taking place in Albany, NY today through Sunday.  LibertyCon 2018 is entitled “Embracing Equity in a Global Society.”

The conference features workshops, exhibits, vendors, art, discussions and presentations.

Tonight’s opening speakers are Thomas DeWolf and Sharon Morgan – co-authors of “Gather at the Table: The Healing Journey of a Daughter of Slavery and a Son of the Slave Trade” – they join us along with Mary Liz Stewart, Co-founder and Executive Director of Underground Railroad History Project.

Richard McGregor, a former Financial Times Beijing bureau chief, has just written a behind-the-headlines guide to the history and current state of our country’s relations with the two most powerful nations in East Asia, Japan and China.

In Asia’s Reckoning: China, Japan, and the Fate of U.S. Power in the Pacific Century, McGregor unpacks the old, toxic rivalries between U.S., Japan, and China, and looks to the future as it changes and redefines the world order in the 21stcentury.

Richard McGregor is a journalist and an author with extensive experience in reporting from East Asia and Washington. 

New York Times Foreign Affairs Columnist Thomas L. Friedman will give a presentation entitled "The Big Trends Shaping the World Today: Economics, Technology, and Geopolitics" at Proctors in Schenectady, NY on February 9th at 8 p.m. The event is presented by Union College.

Friedman is renowned for his direct reporting and sophisticated analysis of complex issues facing the world. His New York Times bestseller, co-written with Michael Mandelbaum, is That Used to Be Us: How America Fell Behind in the World It Invented and How We Can Come Back.

Friedman's The World is Flat sold over four million copies and won the inaugural Financial Times and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award. In 2012, Friedman updated his National Book Award-winner, From Beirut to Jerusalem, adding a fresh discussion of the Arab Awakenings and Arab/Israeli relations in a new preface and afterword. His latest book, Thank You For Being Late, was released in Fall 2016.

This morning we will talk about Women Against War's Annual Gathering – coming up on February 8th in Loudonville, NY. Their featured speaker is author & activist Phyllis Bennis to discuss ISIS, Syria & the US in the Middle East. 

Bennis is the author of Understanding ISIS & the New Global War on Terror: A Primer.  She is Director of the New Internationalism Project at the Institute for Policy Studies in Washington, D.C., a key resource for peace activists. 

She has served as an informal adviser to several top UN officials on the Middle East and UN democratization issues. In 2001 she helped found and remains active with the US Campaign to End the Israeli Occupation. She has recently joined the national board of Jewish Voice for Peace. 

  What we consume has become a central—perhaps the central—feature of modern life. Our economies live or die by spending, we increasingly define ourselves by our possessions, and this ever-richer lifestyle has had an extraordinary impact on our planet. How have we come to live with so much stuff, and how has this changed the course of history?

In Empire of Things, Frank Trentmann unfolds the extraordinary story of our modern material world, from Renaissance Italy and late Ming China to today’s global economy. While consumption is often portrayed as a recent American export, this monumental and richly detailed account shows that it is in fact a truly international phenomenon with a much longer and more diverse history.

  Bret Stephens, winner of the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for commentary, is the foreign affairs columnist and deputy editorial page editor of The Wall Street Journal. His new book is: America In Retreat: The New Isolationism and the Coming Global Disorder.

In the face of economic troubles at home, Americans have been weary of acting as the world’s policeman. Troops are coming home in some cases, certain military spending is being cut, and surveillance programs are being exposed and curtailed.

Stephens makes the case that there is a profound connection between the new global disorder and America’s diminishing international footprint.

Herbert London: Global Citizenship

Feb 27, 2014

When President Obama visited Berlin a couple of years ago he raised the prospect of an idea that circulated throughout the twentieth century: world citizenship. Eminentos such as H.G. Wells and Bertrand Russell contended that unless humanity embraced this nation, it is doomed.