global warming

Woodstock Day School Wins International EcoChallenge

May 31, 2019
Kessner Photography/Wikimedia Commons

A private school in New York’s Hudson Valley has won an international challenge aimed at addressing climate change. The Woodstock Day School amassed the most points worldwide in the Drawdown EcoChallenge, coming out as both top school and top team.

Bill McKibben is a founder of the environmental organization 350.org and was among the first to have warned of the dangers of global warming. He is the author of fifteen books, including the bestsellers "The End of Nature," "Eaarth," and "Deep Economy." He is the Schumann Distinguished Scholar in Environmental Studies at Middlebury College and the winner of the Gandhi Prize, the Thomas Merton Prize, and the Right Livelihood Prize.

Thirty years ago he offered one of the earliest warnings about climate change; now in "Falter," he provides a powerful, sobering call to arms to save not only our planet but all humanity.

McKibben and Joe Donahue will talk about "Falter" in an Off the Shelf edition of The Book Show at Northshire Bookstore in Manchester Center, VT on Friday, April 19 at 6 p.m.

Students from Albany High, Duanesburg and a host of area schools braved a fierce wind outside the Capitol.
WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

A Friday climate change rally in Albany's West Capitol Park was held in solidarity with hundreds of others across the globe as part of the "School Strike 4 Climate.”

In California, wildfires now rage year-round, destroying thousands of homes. Across the US, “500-year” storms pummel communities month after month, and floods displace tens of millions annually. This is only a preview of the changes to come. And they are coming fast. Without a revolution in how billions of humans conduct their lives, parts of the Earth could become close to uninhabitable, and other parts horrifically inhospitable, as soon as the end of this century.

In "The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming," David Wallace-Wells brings into stark relief the climate troubles that await: food shortages, refugee emergencies, and other crises that will reshape the globe.

David Wallace-Wells is a national fellow at the New America foundation and a columnist and deputy editor at New York magazine.

Climate System Research Center at UMass Amherst

    2018 was the wettest year on record in Massachusetts.  The Quabbin Reservoir is at 100.4 percent of capacity – the highest water level since it was built in 1946.

Filmmaker and activist Josh Fox looks to answer many questions through art and literature. The big question is what will the future hold?

In his first book, "The Truth Has Changed" Josh Fox examines two major shifts in the world, climate change and the way we process information. Josh Fox is the editor, director, and narrator of the Oscar nominated, Emmy-award winning film "Gasland". Fox is performing,"The Truth Has Changed" as a one man spoken-word act.

Courtesy of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Forest soils are absorbing less methane. And a recent study says this could, in part, explain rising atmospheric levels of the greenhouse gas. WAMC’s Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Allison Dunne spoke with Peter Groffman, co-author of the study and senior research fellow at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies.

Christopher White has written numerous books, including "Skipjack: The Story of America’s Last Sailing Oystermen" and "The Melting World: A Journey Across America’s Vanishing Glaciers." His articles have appeared in Audubon, The Baltimore Sun, The New Mexican, National Geographic, and Exploration.

In his new book, "The Last Lobster: Boom or Bust for Maine's Greatest Fishery?" he follows three lobster captains: Frank, Jason, and Julie (one the few female skippers in Maine), as they haul and set thousands of traps.

For the past five years, the lobster population along the coast of Maine has boomed, resulting in a lobster harvest six times the size of the record catch from the 1980s an event unheard of in fisheries. In a detective story, scientists and fishermen explore various theories for the glut. Leading contenders are a sudden lack of predators and a recent wedge of warming waters, which may disrupt the reproductive cycle, a consequence of climate change. Unexpectedly, boom may turn to bust, as the captains must fight a warming ocean, volatile prices, and rough weather to keep their livelihood afloat.

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A federal judge has tossed out New York City's effort to hold oil companies responsible for global warming, saying it's not the judiciary's responsibility.

We all want to be happy. Yet as we consume ever more in a frantic bid for happiness, global warming worsens. Alarmed by drastic changes now occurring in the Earth's climate systems, the author, a climate scientist and suburban father of two, embarked on a journey to change his life and the world. He began by bicycling, growing food, meditating, and making other simple, fulfilling changes. Ultimately, he slashed his climate impact to under a tenth of the US average and became happier in the process.

Being the Change explores the connections between our individual daily actions and our collective predicament. It merges science, spirituality, and practical action to develop a satisfying and appropriate response to global warming.

Peter Kalmus is a climate scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory with a Ph.D. in physics from Columbia University. His new book is Being the Change: Live Well and Spark a Climate Revolution.

The new exhibit - Face Them - at the Lichtenstein Gallery for the Arts in Pittsfield, MA opens June 2nd and will be up through June 24th.

Face Them is an opportunity to gather artistic intelligence through several mediums in one gallery. By placing pertinent topic images of today before the viewer that may make one feel moved not of our imagination, but of our reality.

The topics are big ones: Global Warming, Population Explosion, Gun Control, Human Trafficking, and Animal Abuse.

To tell us more – we welcome National Geographic Photographer John Stanmeyer and Barbara Arpante – Curator of Face Them and a Collage Artist.

  Annie Proulx is the author of ten books, including the novel, The Shipping News and the short story, Brokeback Mountain.

Her new novel, Barkskins, imagines the forging of a new world through humanity’s insatiable appetite for timber and through two families intertwined in the early onslaught of modern global deforestation.

US News and World Report has declared that “the 2016 presidential election may be America’s last chance to elect a leader who will halt climate change.” National Geographic Channel will premiere the second season of the Emmy award-winning documentary series Years of Living Dangerously this Sunday, October 30th at 8PM — just over a week before the presidential election.

Years of Living Dangerously once again features some of Hollywood’s biggest influencers who are passionate about environmental issues, and it reveals emotional and hard-hitting accounts of the effects of climate change from across the planet.

On the premiere, In his first television project since retiring as host of CBS’s The Late Show, David Letterman travels to India for the first time to find out what the world’s soon-to-be most populous country is going to do to expand its inadequate energy grid, power its booming economy and bring basic electricity to 300 million citizens who have never plugged in. 

David Gelber is an Executive Producer of Years of Living Dangerously. He served as Ed Bradley’s producer at 60 Minutes for twenty-five years, during which he won every major journalism award, including a Peabody, two DuPont Awards and eight Emmy Awards.

NASA

New York's top environmental official Basil Seggos says the state has cut air pollution and improved water quality but global warming now presents the greatest long-term threat to people.

I’d like to speak across the aisle. We have values in common even though we sometimes draw different conclusions. My point is simple. We are all against killing babies, their brothers, sisters, mothers and fathers. A religious revival in this country has focused on one form of what many consider baby-killing. There are, however, other ways of killing babies in unspeakable numbers.

Winter's On A Roll

Feb 9, 2015
WAMC Photo by Dave Lucas

The latest storm is upon us, and once again the region is dealing with slippery commutes, snow emergencies, and school closings and delays.

It's a "rinse and repeat" playback of last Monday: roads in poor condition from Rochester back through the Mohawk Valley, Hudson Valley eastward into New England and points south.  Conditions are expected to improve once the snow stops falling and the plows keep plowing.

Stephen Gottlieb: Global Warming And Human Politics

Apr 8, 2014

I just got back from Chicago where I attended a national meeting of political scientists.  One of them described at length the local, national and international barriers to doing anything about climate change.  His basic point was that those whose livelihood seemed to depend on activities that are bringing on climate change  are strategically placed to prevent the rest of us from doing anything.  His point is that to make anything happen  it would be necessary to make people come to think about what they are doing as wrong  in the teeth of evidence that it is good for them in their own lifetimes.  That also makes them totally resistant to the idea that climate change is happening,  that human activity is a substantial cause of the change, that it will do any damage  and that it is worth dealing with.  Ouch for the rest of us.

Rising temperatures are threatening the biodiversity of the Arctic.

Dr. Hans Meltofte, senior scientist at Denmark's Aarhus University, describes the negative impact of climate change in this area as "already visible" and details the serious ecological consequences that are resulting.

WAMC photocomposite by Dave Lucas

Homeowners from Greene county down through the Catskills and Hudson Valley hit by flooding have two weeks left to apply for financial assistance from the state.

To date, the NY Rising Housing Recovery Program has paid more than $280 million to 6,388 homeowners for damages that resulted from Superstorm Sandy, Hurricane Irene, or Tropical Storm Lee. The program funds repair, mortgage assistance, flood mitigation and buyouts of damaged homes.

Officials say every eligible homeowner who applied by January 20th has been issued a check for home reconstruction.

Stephen Gottlieb: Environmental Degradation As Murder

Feb 18, 2014

I don’t think of myself as a motivational speaker. I try to explain, and hope my commentaries provide helpful explanations. But this time, I want to challenge and motivate everyone to take strong action on the environmental catastrophe facing us.

    

  The past fifteen thousand years--the entire span of human civilization--have witnessed dramatic sea level changes, which began with rapid global warming at the end of the Ice Age, when sea levels were more than 700 feet below modern levels. Over the next eleven millennia, the oceans climbed in fits and starts. These rapid changes had little effect on those humans who experienced them, partly because there were so few people on earth, and also because they were able to adjust readily to new coastlines.

The Attacking Ocean: The Past, Present, and Future of Rising Sea Levels, from celebrated author Brian Fagan, tells a tale of the rising complexity of the relationship between humans and the sea at their doorsteps, a complexity created not by the oceans, which have changed but little. What has changed is us, and the number of us on earth.

One year ago, Hurricane Sandy devastated the Eastern Seaboard with high winds, heavy rain and a storm surge of more than 13 feet, claiming 44 lives and displacing thousands. The Superstorm turned the greatest city in the world into a city of darkness and called new attention to climate change.

wikipedia commons

As the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy approaches, environmental groups are looking at ways to prevent a similar weather event.

Launched in Albany Thursday, the New York Rising Community Construction program’s goal is to empower localities to develop and implement recovery plans after the damage done by storms Sandy, Lee and Irene, and more recently, by the severe flooding in the Mohawk Valley caused by heavy rains in late June. 

It's A Cruel Summer...

Jul 16, 2013
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Forecasters say the Northeast is in for one of the hottest weeks on the books, and people are being urged to take precautions. High temperatures in many Northeastern cities through Friday will be in the 90s; 96 for Hartford, 95 in New York City and 92 in Albany.  Anthony Loconto is a National Weather Service meteorologist stationed in Burlington, Vermont. Loconto says oppressive weather is here to stay for a few more days.

WAMC photocomposite by Dave Lucas

Powerful storms rolled through upstate New York Wednesday night, flooding streets, downing trees and closing roads.  

Wednesday evening saw mobilephones abuzz with storm alerts, watches and warnings as Albany-area TV meteorologists hunkered down to anchor extended coverage of dangerous inclement weather that ran up close to 9 p.m. The storms originated in Central New York and wreaked havoc as they traveled eastward.

WAMC's Brian Shields spoke with Jeff Deyette, senior energy analyst at the Union of Concerned Scientists. He is the author of Cooler Smarter: Practical Steps for Low-Carbon Living and toured New York this week to discuss how people can reduce their carbon footprints, including stops at the Ithaca Sustainability Center, Cornell University, and Albany Mayor Jerry Jennings’ Office of Energy and Sustainability.

Office of Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders will hold a conference this weekend in Montpelier focused on the regional impacts of climate change.

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders and California Senator Barbara Boxer have introduced legislation  to address climate change by imposing fees on carbon emissions and funding sustainable energy.

Global warming is the earth’s response to unrestrained capitalism. Everybody gets to make, buy and use whatever they want without regard to how it affects the sustainability of the environment and everyone in it. Drilling in the Gulf, the Arctic or anywhere, hydrofracking in New York, Pennsylvania or anywhere, turning food like corn into oil that can be burned, all make carbon based fuels that contribute to global warming.  

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