george washington

Brad Meltzer is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of "The Escape Artist," "The Inner Circle," and many other bestselling thrillers, as well as the "Ordinary People Change the World" series. He is also the host of the History Channel TV shows Brad Meltzer’s "Decoded" and Brad Meltzer’s "Lost History," which he used to help find the missing 9/11 flag that the firefighters raised at Ground Zero.

His first non-fiction book for adults is out now. Co-authored with John Mensch, "The First Conspiracy: The Secret Plot to Kill George Washington," takes place during the most critical period of our nation’s birth and tells a remarkable and previously untold piece of American history that not only reveals George Washington’s character, but also illuminates the origins of America’s counterintelligence movement that led to the modern day CIA.

It is 18 months after the signing of the Declaration of Independence, and some 12,000 members of America’s beleaguered Continental Army stagger into a small Pennsylvania encampment 23 miles northwest of British-occupied Philadelphia. The starving and half-naked force is reeling from a string of demoralizing defeats at the hands of King George III’s army, and are barely equipped to survive the coming winter. Their commander in chief, the focused and forceful George Washington, is at the lowest ebb of his military career. The Continental Congress is in exile and the American Revolution appears to be lost. Yet a spark remains.

"Valley Forge" is the story of how that metamorphosis occurred. Bob Drury and Tom Clavin, the team behind such bestsellers as "The Heart of Everything That Is," "The Last Stand of Fox Company," and "Halsey’s Typhoon," show us how this miracle was accomplished despite thousands of American soldiers succumbing to disease, starvation, and the elements.

Nathaniel Philbrick, one of America’s pre-eminent historians, and the National Book Award-winning and New York Times bestselling author of In the Heart of the Sea, Bunker Hill, and Valiant Ambition, returns to the American Revolution, a subject he’s researched and written about for twenty years.

His new book, "In The Hurricane’s Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown," chronicles the remarkable year leading up to the siege of Yorktown, the battle that ultimately broke a years-long stalemate with the British and earned America her freedom.

"In The Hurricane’s Eye" also highlights Washington’s underappreciated naval cunning and his fraught relationship with French leaders.

Strands of Washington's hair were found in an envelope tucked inside a leather book. Also inside: an 1804 letter to Philip Schuyler,  son of Union College co-founder Gen. Philip Schuyler
Union College

In olden times before cameras and voice recorders, friends and acquaintances often gave one another strands of hair as keepsakes.  Long ago, someone placed an envelope containing strands of our first president's hair in a leather book that has now surfaced at Union College in Schenectady.

  Best-selling historian Nathaniel Philbrick once again takes readers deep into the American Revolution, leading them into battles and illuminating the players on the field and behind the scenes.

His latest - Valiant Ambition: George Washington, Benedict Arnold, and the Fate of the American Revolution - is a complex, controversial, and dramatic portrait of a people in crisis and the war that gave birth to a nation. 

  Using Washington's extensive but often overlooked financial papers, Edward G. Lengel chronicles the fascinating and inspiring story of how this self-educated man built the Mount Vernon estate into a vast multilayered enterprise and prudently managed meager resources to win the war of independence.

Later, as president, he helped establish the national economy on a solid footing and favorably positioned the nation for the Industrial Revolution. Washington's steadfast commitment to the core economic principles of probity, transparency, careful management, and calculated boldness are timeless lessons that should inspire and instruct investors even today.

Historian Ed Lengel is here to talk about his new book, First Entrepreneur: How George Washington Built His – and the Nation’s – Prosperity.

  Best-selling historian Nathaniel Philbrick once again takes readers deep into the American Revolution, leading them into battles and illuminating the players on the field and behind the scenes. His latest - Valiant Ambition - is a complex, controversial, and dramatic portrait of a people in crisis and the war that gave birth to a nation.

The focus is on loyalty and personal integrity, evoking a Shakespearean tragedy that unfolds in the key relationship of George Washington and Benedict Arnold. Philbrick gives readers a fresh view of America’s first president and offers a surprisingly sympathetic view of the man whose name is synonymous with the word traitor.

  Conceived soon after the American Revolution ended, the great monument to George Washington was not finally completed until almost a century later; the great obelisk was finished in 1884, and remains the tallest stone structure in the world at 555 feet.

The story behind its construction is a largely untold and intriguing piece of American history, which acclaimed historian John Steele Gordon relates in his book, Washington's Monument And the Fascinating History of the Obelisk.

  For George Washington, the stakes were high. If the nation fragmented, as it had almost done after the war, it could never become the strong, independent nation for which he had fought. In scores of communities, he communicated a powerful and enduring message—that America was now a nation, not a loose collection of states. And the people responded to his invitation in ways that he could never have predicted.

In T. H. Breen's book, George Washington's Journey: The President Forges a New Nation, he shows Washington in the surprising role of political strategist.

  Sarah Vowell is the bestselling author of Assassination Vacation and The Partly Cloudy Patriot. Her latest look at history is an insightful and unconventional account of George Washington’s trusted officer and friend, that swashbuckling teenage French aristocrat the Marquis de Lafayette.

Drawn to the patriots’ war out of a lust for glory, Enlightenment ideas and the traditional French hatred for the British, young Lafayette crossed the Atlantic expecting to join forces with an undivided people, encountering instead fault lines between the Continental Congress and the Continental Army, rebel and loyalist inhabitants, and a conspiracy to fire George Washington, the one man holding together the rickety, seemingly doomed patriot cause.

  In The Return of George Washington: 1783-1789, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Edward J. Larson recovers a crucially important—yet almost always overlooked—chapter of George Washington’s life, revealing how Washington saved the United States by coming out of retirement to lead the Constitutional Convention and serve as our first president.

  George Washington was famously unknowable, a man of deep passions hidden behind a facade of rigid self-control. Yet before he was a great general and president, Washington was a young man prone to peevishness and a volcanic temper. His greatness as a leader evolved over time, the product of experience and maturity but also a willed effort to restrain his wilder impulses.

Robert Middlekauff focuses on Washington’s early years in his new book, Washington's Revolution: The Making of America's First Leader.

    

  Although the framers gave the president little authority, George Washington knew whatever he did would set precedents for generations of future leaders. To ensure their ability to defend the nation, he simply ignored the Constitution when he thought it necessary.

Drawing on rare documents and letters, Unger shows how Washington combined political cunning and sheer genius to seize ever-widening powers, impose law and order while ensuring individual freedom, and shape the office of President of the United States.