generation | WAMC

generation

A new generation is stepping up. There are now 26 millennials in Congress; a fivefold increase gained in the last midterms. They’re governing over Midwestern cities and college towns, running for city councils and serving in state legislatures. They’re acting urgently on climate change (because they’re going to live it); they care deeply about student debt (because they have it); they’re utilizing big tech but still want to regulate it (because they understand how it works).

TIME national correspondent Charlotte Alter examines how millennials have gained power—from City Hall to Congress—in order to learn what America might look like when they’re in charge, in her new book: "The Ones We’ve Been Waiting For: How a New Generation of Leaders Will Transform America."

Over the last three years, Charlotte Alter has crisscrossed the country speaking with the millennial leaders who are trying to rebuild the country from the ground up.

In his new book, A Generation of Sociopaths, author Bruce Cannon Gibney looks to show how America was hijacked by Baby Boomers, a generation, he believes, whose reckless self-indulgence degraded the foundations of American prosperity. A former partner in a leading venture capital firm, Gibney examines the policies of the most powerful generation in modern history, saying Boomers enriched themselves at the expense of future generations.

Gibney says acting without empathy, prudence, or respect for facts--acting, in other words, as sociopaths--the Boomers turned American dynamism into stagnation, inequality, and bipartisan fiasco. Gibney argues that younger generations have a window to hold the Boomers accountable and begin restoring America.

Bruce Gibney is a writer and venture capitalist, working at a hedge fund and as a partner at one of Silicon Valley’s leading venture firms, Founders Fund.