fusion voting

New York state Capitol
Jim Levulis / WAMC

New York state’s public campaign finance commission has voted on a package of bills that would enact a public matching donor program, and put strict new limits on the abilities of minor parties to qualify to be on the ballot. Monday’s meeting was at times interrupted by protesters, who compared the commission’s actions to those of President Donald Trump, while some government reform groups say they can’t support the final product.

Senate Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins
Karen DeWitt

A commission designing a public campaign finance system for New York’s political races is poised to limit fusion voting, or the ability for candidates to run on multiple party lines. Now the leader of the State Senate, is saying that it would be better if the commission leaves it alone. 

Some members of a commission that’s creating the rules for a public campaign finance system for elected offices in New York state are concerned the plans being developed are too favorable to incumbent politicians.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo
WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

If you’ve voted in New York state, you may have been able to vote for the same candidate on multiple ballot lines. But it could be the last election with so-called fusion voting in New York.

Pat Bradley/WAMC

The chair of New York State’s Democratic Party, Jay Jacobs, has found himself on the defensive after a leaked email revealed a proposal that could weaken minor parties backed by progressive Democrats, and strengthen the state’s Conservative Party.

Karen Dewitt

New York state’s Republican Party chair is angered over the news that a commission to create a public campaign finance system for the state plans to issue its report on Thanksgiving Eve — traditionally a time when politicians release items that they want to downplay.

New York state Capitol
Jim Levulis / WAMC

A New York commission tasked with developing a plan to publicly finance state election campaigns will hold a special meeting on Columbus Day. Meanwhile, the state legislature is considering whether to return to the Capitol in December for a special session to potentially reverse some of the commission’s anticipated decisions.   

Karen DeWitt

Tempers flared Wednesday at a public hearing of a commission formed to enact a public campaign financing system for New York. But the tensions centered not on that proposal, but on the commission’s decision to also consider whether to end fusion voting, which allows candidates to run on multiple ballot lines.

New York State Capitol
Karen DeWitt

The first hearing of a state commission to implement a public campaign finance system for New York’s elections was overshadowed by the issue of whether to end fusion voting, which allows candidates to run on multiple ballot lines. Critics of the proposal say Democratic Governor Andrew Cuomo wants to strike against a left-leaning party that he’s been feuding with, something the governor denies.

Dr. Alan Chartock
Eric Korenman

WAMC's Dr. Alan Chartock discusses reports that New York U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand has dropped out of the Democratic presidential race. 

A vote here sign in English and Spanish on sidewalk
WAMC

Political parties that represent the left and the right of New York’s political spectrum have joined in a common interest, and filed lawsuits against a new commission that might curtail their rights to cross endorse political candidates. Though the two parties in some cases hold diametrically opposing views on policy, they share a belief that Democratic Governor Andrew Cuomo is trying to get rid of the practice as part of a political vendetta.   

Jesse McKinley
Jesse McKinley

WAMC's David Guistina speaks with Jesse McKinley of the New York Times about a pair of lawsuits recently filed by two political parties over fusion voting in New York.

New York State Capitol
Karen DeWitt

A commission to examine a public campaign finance system for state wide elections in New York may also look at whether to continue the state’s practice of what’s known as fusion voting. It allows more than one political party to support the same candidate on the ballot, a practice that resulted in the Democratic and Republican candidates for governor appearing on a total of six different ballot lines in 2018. But the proposed change has members on the left and the right of the mainstream political parties concerned.