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The Woodstock Film Festival is announcing its 2020 lineup of screenings and events that will be held virtually and at area drive-ins, including a pop-up drive-in at Andy Lee Field in Woodstock.

The 21st annual festival is scheduled for Wednesday, Sept. 30, through Sunday, Oct. 4. This year's festival will be a "reformatted virtual edition," due to the COVID-19 pandemic, with in-person screenings limited to drive-in venues in Woodstock, Greenville and Poughkeepsie.

Festival Executive Director and Co-founder Meira Blaustein joins us this morning to tell us more. 

John Waters is an iconic filmmaker, actor, and author whose credits include "Pink Flamingos," "Hairspray," "Crybaby," "A Dirty Shame" and best selling books including "Role Models, and "Carsick."

His new book is just out in paperback. It's called "Mr. Know-It-All." It's a collection of essays where Waters reflects on everything from overcoming unexpected respectability to becoming a rebel in the autumn of your years.

Best known for directing such successes as "Addams Family Values," "Get Shorty," and the first three "Men in Black" movies, Barry Sonnenfeld's importance to modern cinema expands considerably when his cinematographer credits are added to the list: The Coen Brothers' first three films: "Blood Simple," "Raising Arizona," and "Miller's Crossing." He also was the Director of Photography on "Throw Momma from the Train," "Big," "When Harry Met Sally," and "Misery," plus, of course, his television hits: "Pushing Daisies" and "A Series of Unfortunate Events."

Jamie Bernstein
Steve J. Sherman / Star Tribune

Jamie Bernstein is an author, narrator, and filmmaker. Her memoir, "Famous Father Girl," details her youth growing up with her father, composer-conductor Leonard Bernstein, and her mother, pianist and actress Felicia Montealegre.

This summer, Jamie Bernstein will introduce online airings of special Boston Symphony Orchestra Encore Performances from Tanglewood. The concerts will feature the BSO and Tanglewood Festival Chorus and will be available online on Sundays at 2:30 p.m. July 5 through August 23.

Studio Harcourt / wikimedia.org

The New York Times describes Charles Burnett as “the nation’s least-known great filmmaker and most gifted black director.” On Tuesday, he speaks with fellow filmmakers Julie Dash and Bradford Young at Bard College as a part of the school’s “Creative Process in Dialogue: Art and the Public Today” series. Burnett – director of films like Killer Of Sheep and The Glass Shield – was deeply involved in the UCLA film school’s L.A. Rebellion film movement, an explosion of African-American films from the 1960’s to the 1980’s addressing social issues. He spoke with WAMC about what role he feels film plays in contemporary American life.

Founded in 2014 in Oakland, California by two queer women of color as a social justice alternative to scouting organizations, The Radical Monarchs create an opportunity for young girls of color to gather and grow together while celebrating their identities and contributing to their communities.

The documentary film “We Are The Radical Monarchs” will screen at Images Cinema in Williamstown, Massachusetts at 7 p.m. on Monday, January 13. 

Linda Goldstein Knowlton is the Director and Co-producer of the film and she joins us now.

Goldstein Knowlton is an Emmy-nominated filmmaker whose projects include “Women and Hollywood,” one of the six, one-hour documentaries for the Emmy-nominated PBS MAKERS: Women Who Make America series. Prior to that, she produced “Code Black” and “Somewhere Between.” For her directorial debut, Linda co-directed “The World According to Sesame Street,” which debuted at the 2006 Sundance Film Festival. She started her career producing feature films, including the award-winning “Whale Rider” and “The Shipping News.” With Katie Flint she runs the independent production company Ladylike Films.

FilmColumbia offers a rich and diverse schedule of documentaries, shorts, filmmaker Q&As and special events for film fans of all stripes to mark its 20th anniversary this year.

FilmColumbia 2019 will take place October 18– 27 in Chatham, New York and is presented by the Crandell Theatre, with festival events also taking place at the Morris Memorial and other locations in town.

FilmColumbia is programmed by Executive Director and Co-Artistic Director Peter Biskind and Co-Artistic Director Larry Kardish. Biskind is an author, film historian, contributing editor at Vanity Fair and Esquire, and past executive editor of Premiere magazine. Kardish is senior curator emeritus for film and media at New York’s Museum of Modern Art. Calliope Nicholas is the Managing Director of the festival and the primary programmer of the Morris Memorial schedule.

Upstate Films in Rhinebeck, New York will hold a screening of "Heading Home: The Tale of Team Israel" followed by a discussion with documentarian Seth Kramer on Sunday, March 24 at 2:30 p.m.

"Heading Home" is the upbeat and crowd-pleasing story of Team Israel as they compete as underdogs for their first time in the World Baseball Classic. Seth Kramer’s films include: "The Linguists, Evocateur: The Morton Downey Jr. Movie," and "The Anthropologist." Local to the mid-Hudson Valley, Seth lives in Red Hook and works at Ironbound Films with collaborators Daniel Miller and Jeremy Newberger.

Award-winning actress and filmmaker Isabella Rossellini takes inspiration from the natural world in her new theatrical lecture, addressing the latest scientific discoveries about animal minds, intelligence, and emotions.

In "Link Link Circus," Rossellini is joined by Pan, her trained dog, as she transforms herself into Aristotle, Descartes, B. F. Skinner, and Charles Darwin to deliver a vivid monologue about the brilliance of the animal kingdom.

"Link Link Circus" will be performed in the Sosnoff Theater at Bard College's Fisher Center on November 17 at 7:30 p.m.

Filmmaker and activist Josh Fox looks to answer many questions through art and literature. The big question is what will the future hold?

In his first book, "The Truth Has Changed" Josh Fox examines two major shifts in the world, climate change and the way we process information. Josh Fox is the editor, director, and narrator of the Oscar nominated, Emmy-award winning film "Gasland". Fox is performing,"The Truth Has Changed" as a one man spoken-word act.

The new documentary film, "Netizens," exposes the proliferation of cyber harassment faced by women, spreading from the web to the most intimate corners of their lives. As the internet becomes the next frontier of civil rights, this feature documentary follows three women who are targets of harassment, along with advocates, legal experts and others, as they confront digital abuse and strive for equality and justice online.

"Netizens" will screen twice as part of the Woodstock Film Festival. Cynthia Lowen is an award-winning filmmaker and writer and she joins us.

In her documentary film “Hot to Trot,” Hudson Valley based filmmaker, Gail Freedman, brings her audience into the world of same-sex ballroom dancing -- and into the lives of several dancers.

“Hot to Trot” will screen at Upstate Films in Rhinebeck, New York on October 6 and at the Rosendale Theatre in Rosendale, New York on October 21. Gail Freedman will be in attendance for both screenings.

In more than 20 years as an award-winning filmmaker, Freedman has produced, directed and written dozens of documentaries on a wide range of subjects, through her company, Parrot Productions. She has also taught at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Among her films is Making the 9/11 Memorial, a primetime special for The History Channel, which aired on the 10th anniversary of September 11th, when the Memorial opened. Her creative output encompasses independent projects, as well as extensive work for PBS, network television, cable, syndication and the Internet, along with educational and non-profit films.

StudioFest, taking place this weekend in Phoenicia, New York, is a first-of-its-kind film festival, offering the festival’s winning short film creator a chance to shoot their debut feature film, backed and supported by experienced industry professionals.

The filmmakers had a submission deadline of August 3. Five finalists have been selected and the public is invited to attend a celebration screening of their works September 22nd at the Phoenicia Playhouse between 2:30 p.m. and 5 p.m.

We are joined by StudioFest founders – and filmmakers - Jess Jacklin and Charles Beale.

Lucy Cooke is an award-winning filmmaker who has written, produced, and directed several popular documentary series for the BBC, PBS, Discovery, and National Geographic. Her first book, "A Little Book of Sloth," was a New York Times bestseller. She hold an MA in zoology from the University of Oxford.

In her new book, "The Truth About Animals: Stoned Sloths, Lovelorn Hippos, and Other Tales from the Wild Side of Wildlife," she takes the reader on a worldwide journey to meet everyone from a Colombian hippo castrator to a Chinese panda porn peddler, all to lay bare the secret (and often hilarious) habits of the animal kingdom.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This week we focus on Youth FX in Albany which looks to empower young people by teaching them the technical and creative aspects of digital film making and media production. We are joined by Executive Director Bhawin Suchak.

Using a trove of footage unearthed from the National Geographic archives, the new documentary film "Jane" tells the true story of Jane Goodall as a young woman whose chimpanzee research challenged the male-dominated scientific consensus of her time and revolutionized our understanding of the natural world.

Filmmaker Brett Morgen joins us. Dubbed the “mad scientist” of documentary film by the New York Times, Brett Morgen has been directing, writing, and producing ground breaking documentary films for the past 15 years.

Echo/Archive At EMPAC

Mar 1, 2018
George MacLeod
George MacLeod / echo-archive.com

A big premiere is happening Friday night at EMPAC.

Choreographer Elena Demyanenko and filmmaker Erika Mijlin’s collaboration Echo/Archive, which has been developed in residence over this past year, is a live dance and film project which features female performers across three generations and focuses on “bodily heritage,” or the way that movements are stored and communicated between bodies. Both artists teach at Bennington College. 

Filmmaker (and the lead video artist on Echo/Archive) Erika Mijlin and EMPAC’s Curator of Theater and Dance Ashley Ferro-Murray join us.

The Northeast Filmmakers Lab is a non-competitive forum for filmmakers and movie goers seeking to interact with industry guests centered around character driven stories.  Past Film Talks and Screenings include films and filmmakers from the US, Europe, Eastern Europe, Middle East and Asia, as well, top regional filmmakers from Upstate New York. 

The Northeast Filmmakers Lab 4th Edition takes place all over the Capital Region – including The Linda WAMC’s Performing Arts Studio - November 9-12. Events include film talks, screenings, industry mixers, parties and more.

We are joined by Michael Camoin, founding director of Northeast Filmmakers Lab; filmmaker Susan Robbins who made the film “Lee’s 88 Keys” about Lee Shaw; and Allen Chou, President of Passion River Films.

Alice Guy-Blaché was the first female film director and the first film studio owner. She made her first film, by her own account, in 1896 at age 23. She went on to write, direct, or produce more than 1,000 films.

Upstate Women in Film and Television (UPWIFT) will present a selection of films by Alice Guy-Blaché at the Rosendale Theater in Rosendale, NY on Wednesday, November 30th; at The Linda in Albany, NY on Friday, December 2nd; and at Upstate Films in Rhinebeck on Sunday, December 11th.

Part of the presentations will be a Skype Q&A with producer and director Pamela Green, who is currently making a feature full-length documentary film about Alice Guy-Blaché for which she has been conducting extensive research for the past five years.

Pamela Green joins us now along with Hanna Sawka, President of UPWIFT.

Are you watching kids scroll through life, with their rapid-fire thumbs and a six-second attention span? Physician and filmmaker Delaney Ruston saw that with her own kids and learned that the average kid spends 6.5 hours a day looking at screens. She wondered about the impact of all this time and about the friction occurring in homes and schools around negotiating screen time—friction she knew all too well. 

In Screenagers, Delaney takes a deeply personal approach as she probes into the vulnerable corners of family life, including her own, to explore struggles over social media, video games, academics and internet addiction. Through poignant, and unexpectedly funny stories, along with surprising insights from authors, psychologists, and brain scientists, Screenagers reveals how tech time impacts kids’ development and offers solutions on how adults can empower kids to best navigate the digital world and find balance.

There will be a screening at the Maple Avenue Middle School at 7PM in Saratoga on 11/30.

We are joined by Delaney Ruston and Gina Karp, who currently teaches high school humanities (and previously taught grades 1-8) at the Waldorf School of Saratoga Springs.

  The Woodstock Film Festival and Upstate Films in Rhinebeck will presents a screening of Newtown on August 24th at 8:15 p.m.

Filmed over the course of nearly three years, the filmmakers use unique access and never before heard testimonies to tell a story of the aftermath of the deadliest mass shooting of schoolchildren in American history on December 14, 2012. Newtown documents a traumatized community fractured by grief and driven toward a sense of purpose.

Kim A. Snyder’s most recent film, NEWTOWN premiered in competition at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival, and was hailed in Entertainment Weekly as among the “Best of Sundance.” NEWTOWN will continue to screen at premiere festivals worldwide and is poised to have a theatrical release in September 2016, with a national broadcast on PBS’s Independent Lens in early 2017.

Maria Cuomo Cole is the award-winning producer of the feature documentary, Newtown, which will be premiering at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival. In her career, she has tackled such relevant subjects as gun violence, homelessness, veterans’ PTSD, Domestic Violence and sexual assault.

They will be at the screening in Rhinebeck and join us to talk about the film.

  Nancy Spielberg grew up surrounded by the film industry, where she worked on her brother Steven’s early films.

She join us this morning to talk about her new documentary, Above and Beyond, and about her Women's Philanthropy Connections event for the Jewish Federation of Northeastern New York

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we're speaking with Tatyana Kleyn whose new film, Una Vida, Dos Paises [One Life, Two Countries] explores some of the stories of those living between two countries, cultures, languages and education systems.

Tatyana Kleyn is a documentary filmmaker, a professor of bilingual education at the City College of New York, and one of the New York Council for the Humanities Public Scholars.

  Darius Clark Monroe, award-winning film director, producer, and screenwriter, will provide commentary and answer questions immediately following the screening of his film, Evolution of a Criminal this Friday in Page Hall on the University at Albany’s downtown campus.

The film reexamines, in strikingly candid fashion, an event from Monroe’s own teenage years: his participation in a 1997 Texas bank robbery and his subsequent incarceration. The film includes a variety of interviews with Monroe’s family members, teachers, and law enforcement officials. Monroe also talks to the two men who robbed the bank with him and stages a reenactment of the crime.

The event is sponsored by the New York State Writers Institute in conjunction with the School of Criminal Justice’s Crime, Justice, and Social Structure film series.

  In How to Let Go of the World and Love All The Things Climate Can't Change, Oscar Nominated director Josh Fox continues in his personal style, investigating climate change. Traveling to 12 countries on 6 continents, the film acknowledges that it may be too late to stop some of the worst consequences and asks, what is it that climate change can’t destroy? What is so deep within us that no calamity can take it away?

Josh Fox is best known as the writer/director of Gasland Parts I and II. He is internationally recognized as a spokesperson and leader on the issue of fracking and extreme energy development. Gasland premiered at the Sundance Film Festival 2010 and was nominated for the 2011 Academy Award for best documentary.

There will be a Woodstock Film Festival screening of How to Let Go of the World and Love All The Things Climate Can't Change and a Q&A with director Josh Fox this Wednesday March 16th @ 6PM at Onteora High School in Boiceville, the event is part of The Let Go and Love tour.

  On the centennial of his birth, the defining wunderkind of modern entertainment  -- Orson Welles -- gets his due in Young Orson: The Years of Luck and Genius on the Path to Citizen Kane Hardcover by Patrick McGilligan.

In the history of American popular culture, there is no more dramatic story—no swifter or loftier ascent to the pinnacle of success and no more tragic downfall—than that of Orson Welles. The tales of his youthful achievements were so colorful and improbable that Welles, with his air of mischief, was often thought to have made them up.

McGilligan sorts out fact from fiction and reveals untold, fully documented anecdotes of Welles’s first exploits and triumphs.

  William Cameron Menzies defined and solidified the role of art director as having overall control of the look of the motion picture, collaborating with producers like David O. Selznick and Samuel Goldwyn; with directors such as D. W. Griffith, Raoul Walsh, Alfred Hitchcock, Lewis Milestone, and Frank Capra. And with actors as varied as Ingrid Bergman, W. C. Fields, Cary Grant, Clark Gable, John Barrymore, Barbara Stanwyck, Ronald Reagan, Gary Cooper, Vivien Leigh, Carole Lombard, Mary Pickford, Gloria Swanson, and David Niven.

In his new book, William Cameron Menzies: The Shape of Films to Come, film historian James Curtis creates a portrait of a man in his time that makes clear how the movies were forever transformed by his startling, visionary work.

  A long weekend of films, receptions, Q&A with filmmakers, hikes, and more are planned for Glimmerglass Film Days, November 5-9 in Cooperstown, NY. “Sacred Places” is the theme of the third annual festival, curated by central New York native Margaret Parsons, founder and director of the film program at the National Gallery of Art.

The selected films explore places of natural and cultural significance, around the world and close to home. Filmmakers and experts in their field will be on hand throughout the event to introduce films and answer questions, enriching the audience’s experience. The Festival also will feature shorts from the Black Maria Film Festival, and receptions with local foods and locally crafted brews and spirits.

  TvFILM is an independent film showcase from WMHT that celebrates the talents of independent filmmakers from upstate New York with a special focus on the Capital District.

This week, TvFILM presents a “Night of Frights" featuring numerous short horror and thriller films, from chilling to comedic. The program first airs October 29th at 10:00pm on WMHT and then will screen at The Linda on Friday, October 30th.

Here to tell us more are Daniel Swinton, the executive producer of the series and Zeke Kubish, TvFilms co-producer and editor.

hbo.com

  America is the most punitive nation in the world, handing out historically harsh sentences that largely dispense with the concept of rehabilitation.

Alan and Susan Raymond - Oscar and Emmy winners for HBO’s I Am a Promise: The Children of Stanton Elementary School - explore the reality of “the other death penalty” in Toe Tag Parole: To Live and Die on Yard A.

Featuring exclusive, unprecedented access, Toe Tag Parole: To Live And Die On Yard A was shot entirely at California State Prison, Los Angeles County, a maximum-security facility in the Mojave Desert. The documentary debuts on Monday, August 3rd at 9PM on HBO.

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