feminism

In the 1990s, a “purity industry” emerged out of the white evangelical Christian culture. Purity rings, purity pledges, and purity balls came with a dangerous message: girls are potential sexual “stumbling blocks” for boys and men, and any expression of a girl’s sexuality could reflect the corruption of her character. This message traumatized many girls—resulting in anxiety, fear, and experiences that mimicked the symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder—and trapped them in a cycle of shame.

Linda Kay Klein sits down to discuss her new book "Pure: Inside The Evangelical Movement That Shamed A Generation Of Young Women And How I Broke Free".

Jason Butler Harner and Janet McTeer in Roundabout Theatre Company's "Bernhardt/Hamlet"
Joan Marcus

Last night, The Roundabout Theatre Company opened a new play by Theresa Rebeck at The American Airlines Theatre in New York City. Directed by Moritz von Stuelpnagel, “Bernhardt/Hamlet” is set just before the turn of the 20th Century when the acclaimed and adored Sarah Bernhardt stages a production of William Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” with herself in the title role of the halting and hesitant Prince of Denmark.

In “Bernhardt/Hamlet,” the divine Sarah is inhabited by Golden Globe, Tony, and Olivier Award-winning actress, Janet McTeer. Bernhardt as penned by Rebeck is having an affair with poet and playwright, Edmond Rostand who is played by our guest, Jason Butler Harner.

Harner’s previous Broadway credits include “The Crucible” and “The Coast of Utopia.” He’s performed Off-Broadway, as well, earning OBIE and Drama Desk nominations. His major film debut came in Clint Eastwood’s Oscar-nominated film “Changeling” and he currently stars on the Netflix series “Ozark.”

CN Lester is an academic, musician, and leading British trans rights activist. A critically acclaimed singer-songwriter, Lester also works as a composer and classical performer. They consult and educate on trans issues with a wide range of organizations and they've written on the trans experience for various outlets.

In their new book, "Trans Like Me," CN Lester takes a measured, thoughtful, intelligent and approachable tour through the most important and high-profile narratives around the trans community, turning them inside out and examining where we really are in terms of progress.

For decades, actress and director Christine Lahti has captivated the hearts and minds of her audience through iconic roles in "Chicago Hope," "Running on Empty," "Housekeeping," "And Justice for All," "Swing Shift," "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit," "God of Carnage," and "The Blacklist." Now, in "True Stories from an Unreliable Eyewitness," this acclaimed performer channels her creativity inward to share her own story for the first time on the page.

In this poignant essay collection, Lahti focuses on three major periods of her life: her childhood, her early journey as an actress and activist, and the realities of her life as a middle-aged woman in Hollywood today.

Rachel Simmons is the author of "Enough As She Is: How to Help Girls Move Beyond Impossible Standards of Success to Live Healthy, Happy and Fulfilling Lives," and the New York Times bestsellers "Odd Girl Out and "The Curse of the Good Girl."

As an educator, Rachel teaches girls and women skills to build their resilience, amplify their voices, and own their courage so that they live with integrity and health.

Starting tomorrow, the New York State Museum is opening an exhibition celebrating the centennial of women’s suffrage in NY titled Votes for Women: Celebrating New York’s Suffrage Centennial. Monday - November 6th - is the 100th anniversary date of women’s suffrage in NY.

Votes for Women celebrates the centennial of women’s suffrage in New York State and raise public awareness of the struggle for women’s suffrage and equal rights in New York State from the 1848 Seneca Falls Conven­tion through 1917 when New York State granted women the right to vote.

The exhibition also addresses the nationally significant role of New York State leaders in regards to women’s rights and the feminist movement through the early 21st century. 

The curators of the exhibition are Jennifer Lemak and Ashley Hopkins-Benton and they join us in studio.

The all female singer-songwriter tour, Steady On: Celebrating Lilith Fair at 20 will come to The Linda - WAMC’s Performing Arts Studio on Saturday at 8pm.

Sharon Goldman, Lara Herscovitch, Amy Soucy, and Sloan Wainwright will play songs made famous at Lilith Fair in the late 90s along with their own music. Sharon Goldman and Sloan Wainwright join us.

Princesses Wear Pants

Sep 20, 2017

From NBC’s TODAY coanchor Savannah Guthrie and educator Allison Oppenheim comes an empowering fairy tale with a twist.

In the tradition of Not All Princesses Dress in Pink and Princess in Black, Princesses Wear Pants follows the unflappable Princess Penelope Pineapple, who knows how to get the job done while staying true to herself. 

Savannah Guthrie is the cohost of TODAY on NBC as well as an attorney and legal analyst. Allison Oppenheim is trained in clinical psychology and is the mother of three.

Linda Hirshman
Nina Subin

Close Encounters with Music is presenting Linda Hirshman and The Feminine Mystique at The Mount in Lenox this coming Sunday at 3 p.m. It is part of their series: Conversations With - intimate and stimulating conversations about music and ideas.

Lawyer, best-selling author, and cultural historian Linda Hirshman has chronicled battles that have changed the social landscape of America in her books Get to Work: A Manifesto For Women of the World, Hard Bargains: The Politics of Sex, and others.

Hirshman will analyze the 14th and 19th Amendments in tandem as two paths to equality in the suffrage effort and as they affected private and public lives of women. 

The Destruction of Hillary Clinton is an answer to the question many have been asking: How did an extraordinarily well-qualified, experienced, and admired candidate -- whose victory would have been as historic as Barack Obama's -- come to be seen as a tool of the establishment, a chronic liar, and a talentless politician?

Susan Bordo is a media critic, cultural historian, and feminist scholar. Her books include Unbearable Weight, which was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, and, most recently, The Creation of Anne Boleyn. She is Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of Kentucky.

Lisa Wade is an associate professor of sociology at Occidental College. Her newest book, American Hookup is about the emergence and character of the culture of sex that dominates college campuses today.

American Hookup situates hookup culture within the history of sexuality, the evolution of higher education, and the unfinished feminist revolution. With new research, Wade maps out a punishing emotional landscape marked by unequal pleasures, competition for status, and sexual violence. She discovers that privileged students tend to enjoy it the most, and considers its effects on racial and sexual minorities, students who “opt out,” and those who participate ambivalently.

Joan Rivers was more than a legendary comedian; she was an icon and a role model to millions, a fearless pioneer who left a legacy of expanded opportunity when she died in 2014.

Her life was a dramatic roller-coaster of triumphant highs and devastating lows: the suicide of her husband, her feud with Johnny Carson, her estrangement from her daughter, her many plastic surgeries, her ferocious ambition and her massive insecurities.

The Joan Rivers story is told in the new biography, Last Girl Before Freeway: The Life, Loves, Losses, and Liberation of Joan Rivers, by Leslie Bennetts. Bennetts is a veteran journalist who was the first woman ever to cover a presidential campaign for The New York Times and was a contributing editor for Vanity Fair for nearly 25-years.

Bestselling author Wally Lamb’s latest, I’ll Take You There, tells the story of film professor Felix Funicello who is visited by the ghost of a trailblazing director from the silent era who invites Felix to revisit – and in some cases re-live – scenes from his past.  


  To Keep the Light is written and directed by Erica Fae, who also stars as Abbie -- the wife of a lighthouse keeper in Northern Maine in the late 1800s. Inspired by true stories of women lighthouse keepers, working in isolation and under extreme conditions, women who inherited their jobs from infirm or deceased husbands or fathers and were trailblazers, embodying feminism long before the word existed.

The film will screen twice at the Woodstock Film Festival - today at 1:30 at Upstate Films in Rhinebeck, NY and Sunday at 2:15 at Upstate Films in Woodstock.

Caroline Shaw wrote the score for To Keep The Light. Shaw is a Grammy-winning singer in Roomful of Teeth and a violinist in ACME (American Contemporary Music Ensemble). In 2013 she became the youngest ever winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Music, for her composition Partita for 8 Voices. Recent and current projects include commissions for the the Cincinnati Symphony, the Guggenheim Museum Works & Process Series, and the Folger Library, as well as collaborations with Kanye West.   

  Feminism has hit the big time. Once a dirty word brushed away with a grimace, “feminist” has been rebranded as a shiny label sported by movie and pop stars, fashion designers, and multi-hyphenate powerhouses like Beyoncé. It drives advertising and marketing campaigns for everything from wireless plans to underwear to perfume, presenting what’s long been a movement for social justice as just another consumer choice in a vast market. Individual self-actualization is the goal, shopping more often than not the means, and celebrities the mouthpieces.

But what does it mean when social change becomes a brand identity? Feminism’s splashy arrival at the center of today’s media and pop-culture marketplace, after all, hasn’t offered solutions to the movement’s unfinished business.

Andi Zeisler, a founding editor of Bitch Media, draws on more than twenty years’ experience interpreting popular culture in this biting history of how feminism has been co-opted, watered down, and turned into a gyratory media trend in her new book, We Were Feminists Once: From Riot Grrrl to CoverGirl®, the Buying and Selling of a Political Movement.

  A feminist, an outspoken activist, a woman without a college education, Midge Costanza was one of the unlikeliest of White House insiders. Yet in 1977 she became the first female Assistant to the President for Public Liaison under Jimmy Carter, emerging as a prominent focal point of the American culture wars. Tasked with bringing the views of special interest groups to the president, Costanza championed progressive causes even as Americans grew increasingly divided on the very issues for which she fought. 

In A Feminist in the White House, Doreen Mattingly draws on Costanza's personal papers to shed light on the life of this fascinating and controversial woman.


  Friend of the show and acclaimed stage actor and singer, Jason Danieley is back in the Berkshires for the summer after playing Billy Flynn in Kander and Ebb’s Chicago on Broadway earlier this year. He is playing Timber Tucker in the Williamstown Theatre Festival production of Wendy Wasserstein’s An American Daughter, running on the mainstage in Williamstown through August 21st.

Tonight he will perform in Pittsfield at Barrington Stage Company with his wife, Marin Mazzie in a concert entitled Broadway and Beyond: Reprise Edition.

  My Life on the Road is Gloria Steinem's first book in over 20 years.

It it, the writer, activist, and organizer offers a candid account of how her early years led her to an on-the-road kin of life; traveling, listening to people, learning, and creating change.

  In her first book in over 20 years, Gloria Steinem -- writer, activist, and organizer -- offers a candid account of how her early years led her to an on-the-road kind of life: traveling, listening to people, learning, and creating change. 

In My Life on the Road, Steinem writes about some of the extraordinary people, famous and not, from whom she has learned along the way. She also reflects on how the most transformative ideas sometimes come from unexpected people and encounters. 

Gloria Steinem co-founded Ms. magazine and helped found New York magazine. In 2013, she received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama. 

We spoke with Gloria Steinem last night -- as news was emerging from San Bernadino -- about her initial reaction to last week's deadly shooting in Colorado Springs, where Richard Dear has been charged with three counts of murder for killing a responding police officer and two others who were inside a Planned Parenthood facility there. 

Sarah McLachlan At UPAC

Nov 25, 2015
photo of Sarah McLachlan
sarahmclachlan.com

  Three time Grammy winning folk-pop singer and songwriter Sarah McLachlan is best known for her emotional ballads, including "I Will Remember You," "Sweet Surrender," "Adia" , "Possession", "Building a Mystery" and "Angel."

She founded the concert festival Lilith Fair, and has sold over 40 million albums worldwide. She will perform at UPAC in Kingston, NY on Sunday, November 29th.

51% Show #1364

Sep 11, 2015

On this week’s 51%, we talk about empowering women and men. First, a producer attempts to crack the mystery of men, and starts The Testosterone Project. Then, we hear from a few high-school students about feminism and gender equality. 

'Beauty's Kingdom'

Jun 8, 2015

  In Beauty's Kingdom, mega-bestselling author Anne Rice, writing as A. N. Roquelaure, returns to the mysterious kingdom of Queen Eleanor in this new chapter of her erotica Sleeping Beauty series.

Anne Rice is the author of many bestselling novels, including the hugely successful Vampire Chronicles. Her other books include the Mayfair Witches series, the novels The Mummy or Ramses the Damned, Violin Angel Time, the Sleeping Beauty trilogy, and, most recently, Prince Lestat: The Vampire Chronicles.

  As an organizer, writer, publisher, scholar-activist, and elected official, Barbara Smith has played key roles in multiple social justice movements, including Civil Rights, feminism, lesbian and gay liberation, anti-racism, and Black feminism.

Her four decades of grassroots activism forged collaborations that introduced the idea that oppression must be fought on a variety of fronts simultaneously, including gender, race, class, and sexuality.

By combining hard-to-find historical documents with new unpublished interviews with fellow activists, her new book, Ain't Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around, uncovers the deep roots of today’s “identity politics” and “intersectionality” and serves as a primer for practicing solidarity and resistance.

Jim Levulis / WAMC

Feminist icon Gloria Steinem spoke at Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts in North Adams, Massachusetts Tuesday night.