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Book cover for "Letter To a Young Female Physician"
W. W. Norton & Company

In 2017, Dr. Suzanne Koven published an essay describing the challenges faced by female physicians, including her own personal struggle with "imposter syndrome"―a long-held secret belief that she was not smart enough or good enough to be a “real” doctor. Accessed by thousands of readers around the world, Koven’s “Letter to a Young Female Physician” has evolved into a new book - a reflection on her career in medicine.

With warmth, clarity, and wisdom, "Letter to a Young Female Physician" reveals a woman forging her authentic identity in a modern landscape that is as overwhelming and confusing as it is exhilarating in its possibilities.

In the 2018 election cycle, women across the country were running in - and winning - local and national office in higher numbers than ever before.

In “See Jane Win: The Inspiring Story of the Women Changing American Politics,” award-winning journalist Caitlin Moscatello provides an insider look at this pivotal time in women’s history.

Closely following four candidates throughout the entire campaign process, Moscatello takes readers inside their exciting, winning campaigns and the sometimes thrilling, sometimes brutal realities of running for office while female.

Pam Jenoff is the author of several books of historical fiction, including the New York Times bestseller "The Orphan's Tale." Her novels are inspired by her experiences working at the Pentagon and as a diplomat for the State Department handling Holocaust issues in Poland.

Her new book, "The Lost Girls of Paris,"shines a light on the incredible heroics of a network of female secret agents in World War II and weaves a mesmerizing tale of courage, sisterhood and the great strength of women to survive in the hardest of circumstances.

  In Identity Unknown, Donna Seaman brings to life seven forgotten female artists, among the best of their day: Gertrude Abercrombie, with her dark, surreal paintings and friendships with Dizzy Gillespie and Sonny Rollins; Bay Area self-portraitist Joan Brown; Ree Morton, with her witty, oddly beautiful constructions; Loïs Mailou Jones of the Harlem Renaissance; Lenore Tawney, who combined weaving and sculpture when art and craft were considered mutually exclusive; Christina Ramberg, whose unsettling works drew on pop culture and advertising; and Louise Nevelson, an art-world superstar in her heyday but omitted from recent surveys of her era.

Donna Seaman is Editor, Adult Books, Booklist, a member of the advisory council for the American Writers Museum, and a recipient of the James Friend Memorial Award for Literary Criticism and the Studs Terkel Humanities Service Award. 

She will be at Oblong Books and Music in Rhinebeck on Saturday, February 25.

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, we continue to learn about the music of Thea Musgrave.

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, we continue to learn about the music of Thea Musgrave.

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, we continue to learn about female composers and begin a series of segments sharing the music of Thea Musgrave.

Alice Guy-Blaché was the first female film director and the first film studio owner. She made her first film, by her own account, in 1896 at age 23. She went on to write, direct, or produce more than 1,000 films.

Upstate Women in Film and Television (UPWIFT) will present a selection of films by Alice Guy-Blaché at the Rosendale Theater in Rosendale, NY on Wednesday, November 30th; at The Linda in Albany, NY on Friday, December 2nd; and at Upstate Films in Rhinebeck on Sunday, December 11th.

Part of the presentations will be a Skype Q&A with producer and director Pamela Green, who is currently making a feature full-length documentary film about Alice Guy-Blaché for which she has been conducting extensive research for the past five years.

Pamela Green joins us now along with Hanna Sawka, President of UPWIFT.


  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani continue their conversation about female composers - focusing on Maria Agata Szymanowska.

Yehuda’s Close Encounter with Music series begins their new season on October 15th with the Chamber Orchestra Kremlin in a program of Haydn, Tchaikovsky, and Shostakovich.