fear

Kate Davies MA, DPhil, has worked on environmental and social issues for her entire career.

We are living in an era of unprecedented crisis, resulting in widespread feelings of fear, despair, and grief. Now, more than ever, maintaining hope for the future is a monumental task. In Davies' new book, "Intrinsic Hope: Living Courageously in Troubled Times," she offers an antidote to these feelings and shows how conventional ideas of hope are rooted in the belief that life will conform to our wishes and how this leads to disappointment, despair, and a dismal view of the future. As an alternative, she offers 'intrinsic hope,' a powerful, liberating, and positive approach to life based on having a deep trust in whatever happens.

Vegas Tenold is an award-winning journalist. He has covered the far right in America for years, as well as human rights in Russia, conflict in central Africa and the Middle East, and national security. A graduate of Columbia University's School of Journalism, his work has appeared in publications including the New York Times, Rolling Stone, New Republic, and Al Jazeera America.

Six years ago, Vegas Tenold embedded himself among the members of three of America's most ideologically extreme white nationalist groups-the KKK, the National Socialist Movement, and the Traditionalist Workers Party. At the time, these groups were part of a disorganized counterculture that felt far from the mainstream.

But since then, all that has changed. Racially-motivated violence has been on open display at rallies in Charlottesville, Berkeley, Pikesville, Phoenix, and Boston. Membership in white nationalist organizations is rising, and national politicians, including the president, are validating their perceived grievances.

Michael Cannell is the author of The Limit: Life and Death on the 1961 Grand Prix Circuit and I.M. Pei: Mandarin of Modernism. He was editor of the New York Times House & Home section for seven years and has written for The New YorkerThe New York Times MagazineSports Illustrated, and many other publications.

His new book is Incendiary: The Psychiatrist, the Mad Bomber, and the Invention of Criminal Profiling.

Grand Central, Penn Station, Radio City Music Hall ― for almost two decades, no place was safe from the man who signed his anonymous letters “FP” and left his lethal devices in phone booths, storage lockers, even tucked into the plush seats of movie theaters. His victims were left cruelly maimed. Tabloids called him “the greatest individual menace New York City ever faced.”

  When the news broke in 1975 that New York City was on the brink of fiscal collapse, few believed it was possible. How could the country’s largest metropolis fail? How could the capital of the financial world go bankrupt? Yet the city was indeed billions of dollars in the red, with no way to pay back its debts. Bankers and politicians alike seized upon the situation as evidence that social liberalism, which New York famously exemplified, was unworkable. The city had to slash services, freeze wages, and fire thousands of workers, they insisted, or financial apocalypse would ensue.

In Fear City: New York's Fiscal Crisis and the Rise of Austerity Politics, historian Kim Phillips-Fein tells the remarkable story of the crisis that engulfed the city.

Sophie Sabbage was forty-eight years old, happily married, and mother to a four-year-old daughter when she was diagnosed with late-stage lung cancer. Since that shocking diagnosis, she has been on a remarkable journey of healing and renewal that has reshaped her life—for the better. 

The Cancer Whisperer chronicles Sophie’s extraordinary relationship with cancer and the very effective methods she has used for dealing with her fear, anger, denial, and grief.

Joseph LeDoux, world-renowned expert on the neurobiology of fear and anxiety, will discuss his new book, Anxious: Using the Brain to Understand and Treat Fear and Anxiety on Tuesday, September 27 at 8 p.m. in the Recital Hall, Performing Arts Center, on the University at Albany’s uptown campus. Earlier that same day at 4:15 p.m., the author will hold an informal seminar in the Standish Room, Science Library on the uptown campus.

The events are sponsored by the New York State Writers Institute and the Science Library of the University at Albany Libraries.

  Eat Pray Love made Elizabeth Gilbert one of the most read and beloved writers of our time. While Eat Pray Love was Gilbert’s personal memoir, many readers took it as stimulus to make changes, large and small, in their own lives.

In the decade since Eat Pray Love was published, people worldwide have sought further advice from Gilbert on how to lead a bold and creative life. Gilbert’s TED talk about creativity has nearly 10 million views, making it one of the most viewed TED talks of all time, and this past fall Gilbert went on tour with Oprah, speaking to over 100,000 people along the way.

  Stanford psychiatrist Dr. Irvin Yalom has practiced in the area of group psychotherapy for over 50 years, and often writes about his personal experiences with his patients.

In his new book Creatures of a Day: And Other Tales of Psychotherapy, he deals with questions of mortality, from his work with terminally ill patients to his own fear of dying.

He joins us to talk about his career as a psychotherapist and what he's learned from his patients in the process. 

Listener Essay - Embracing The Fear

Feb 20, 2015

  Casey Mulligan Walsh is a speech-language pathologist and writer who lives in West Sand Lake. Though she’s made peace with winter driving, it’s still not her strong suit.