family

    Finding the right caregiver can be one of the most life-changing decisions a parent makes. Whether it's a kindly neighbor for the weekday latchkey hours, a teenage babysitter one night a week, or a full-time professional nanny, the right caregiver can enrich a child's world and literally grow her brain. Hire the wrong one, and this person could cause developmental delays and stress for the entire family.

In her new book, Secrets of the Nanny Whisperer: A Practical Guide for Finding and Achieving the Gold Standard of Care for Your Child, nationally recognized parenting expert Tammy Gold draws from her extensive background in child developmental psychology, social work, and family therapy to offer the first childcare bible for parents.

  Already the biological parents of a seven-year-old son and a five-year-old daughter, Claude Knobler and his wife decided to adopt Nati, a five-year-old Ethiopian boy who seemed different from Knobler in every conceivable way.

In his book, More Love, Less Panic: 7 Lessons I Learned About Life, Love, and Parenting After We Adopted Our Son from Ethiopia, explains how his experiences raising Nati led him to learn a lesson that applied equally well to parenting his biological children: It’s essential to spend the time we are given with our children to love them and enjoy them, rather than push and mold them into who we think they should be.

    Dinaw Mengestu’s work, including his first two novels, have earned him incredible critical acclaim as well as a MacArthur Foundation genius grant and selection by the New Yorker as one of their “20 Under 40” young writers central to their generation. And writing about his new novel, All Our Names, Kirkus Reviews calls Mengestu, “among the best novelists now at work in America.”

  

  Boris Fishman, a singularly talented writer, makes his literary debut with this provocative, soulful, and sometimes hilarious story of a failed journalist asked to do the unthinkable: Forge Holocaust-restitution claims for old Russian Jews in Brooklyn, New York.

A Replacement Life is a dark, moving, and beautifully written novel about family, honor, and justice.

  What is it like to grow up with a terrorist in your home? Zak Ebrahim was only seven years old when, on November 5th, 1990, his father El-Sayyid Nosair shot and killed the leader of the Jewish Defense League. While in prison, Nosair helped plan the bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993. In one of his infamous video messages, Osama bin Laden urged the world to “Remember El-Sayyid Nosair.”

For Zak Ebrahim, a childhood amongst terrorism was all he knew. After his father’s incarceration, his family moved often, and as the perpetual new kid in class, he faced constant teasing and exclusion. Yet, though his radicalized father and uncles modeled fanatical beliefs, to Ebrahim something never felt right. His story is told in The Terrorist's Son: A Story of Choice.

Listener Essay - God Rest Ye Merry, Elmo Doll

Dec 22, 2014

  Diane Kavanaugh-Black is an upstate New York writer who leads workshops at Of-the-Essence Holistic Wellness.

"God Rest Ye Merry, Elmo Doll" was one response to the sadness pierced post-divorce question: Were we the family I remember us being? The answer: Yes -- sometimes, yes

      According to the National Center for Health Statistics, less than half of the people who get married in the United States remain with their first spouse, and less than 50 percent of children grow up with both biological parents. In short, we live in a society of blended families. Everyone who survives a divorce and enters a new family is vulnerable.

  George Glass, MD, a board-certified psychiatrist, has designed a book, Blending Families Successfully: Helping Parents and Kids Navigate the Challenges So That Everyone Ends Up Happy, to help parents understand the challenges of beginning new lives with blended families, and to help their children make the necessary adjustments.

Listener Essay - Dummy Bunnies On Parade

Dec 18, 2014

  

  "Dummy Bunnies on Parade" can be found in Kevin O'Hara's book, A Lucky Irish Lad. He is also the author of Last of the Donkey Pilgrims: A Man's Journey Through Ireland.

Clifton Park, NY – Betsy Bitner is a writing living in Clifton Park, NY. She has learned to share her daughter's love of beats.

    

  Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award and finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, Blake Bailey has been hailed as “addictively readable” (New York Times) and praised for his ability to capture lives “compellingly and in harrowing detail” (Time).

The Splendid Things We Planned is his darkly funny account of growing up in the shadow of an erratic and increasingly dangerous brother, an exhilarating and sometimes harrowing story that culminates in one unforgettable Christmas.

Listener Essay - Reflections On A Life Well Lived

Dec 15, 2014

  Mary Jo Hebert lives, writes, and misses her cousin Dave in Clifton Park, New York.

Listener Essay - It's Over!

Dec 12, 2014

  Barbara Redfield lives in Big Indian, NY.   She is a teacher, writer and artist.

It's Over!

    Fanny Neuda was a rabbi's wife living in Moravia in the 1800's. She wrote a book of prayers from a women's perspective, for women to recite on all the occasions of their lives that might require prayer. Dinah Berland happened upon a volume in a used bookstore when she was experiencing her own crisis of faith. The words brought her comfort and an answer to her prayers. She then translated the book into English, in a prose format and it was published in 2007.

Dinah Berland, editor of Hours of Devotion: Fanny Neuda's Book of Prayers for Jewish Women will be at Congregation Shaara Tfille in Saratoga Springs, NY on Sunday, December 7.

Listener Essay - Thanksgiving Conversations

Nov 25, 2014

  Diane Cameron is a public intellectual who writes and speaks about her private life with courage, compassion and humor from the Albany, NY area.

  Chrysler Szarlan’s debut novel, The Hawley Book of the Dead, introduces us to Revelation Dyer. Together, she and her husband Jeremy have three daughters, a beautiful home, and a world-famous Las Vegas magic act.

But Reve has many secrets, secrets that have not only shaped her past but now threaten her family.

  Perhaps no profession is so constantly discussed, regulated, and maligned by non-practitioners as teaching. The voices of the teachers themselves are conspicuously missing.

Defying this trend, teacher and writer Garret Keizer takes us to school in his book, Getting Schooled: The Reeducation of an American Teacher, an arresting account of his return to the same rural Vermont high school where he taught fourteen years ago.

When author Jeff Hobbs arrived at Yale University, he became fast friends with the man who would be his college roommate for four years, Robert Peace. Robert’s life was rough from the beginning in the crime-ridden streets of Newark in the 1980s, with his father in jail and his mother earning less than $15,000 a year.

    

  National Coming Out Day is October 11th. There is a new guide for parents to help them answer questions when their son and/or daughter come out to them. We welcome the authors of the new: This is a Book for Parents of Gay Kids.

  Delia and Nora Ephron were writing partners; they co-wrote the movies You've Got Mail and The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants as well as the off-Broadway hit Love, Loss and What I Wore. Delia was an assistant producer on Nora's film Sleepless in Seattle.

In her latest book, Sister Mother Husband Dog, novelist Delia Ephron writes that losing her older sister, Nora Ephron, was like "losing an arm, it's that deranging." Nora, who wrote When Harry Met Sally, died of acute myeloid leukemia in June 2012.

But for all their collaboration and closeness, Delia acknowledges that sister relationships are complicated. Sister Mother Husband Dog is a collection of autobiographical essays.

Gayle Forman - If I Stay

Aug 20, 2014

For 17 year old Mia, life can’t be the same, as her spirit is hanging in limbo after her family’s car crashes, leaving her the only potential survivor. So begins Gale Forman's young adult novel If I Stay.  Throughout the novel, and now the movie being released this Friday (8/22), we’re brought into a world no one should ever have to face – to choose to live or die - and we follow Mia as she makes this hard decision while in a coma.

   

Swoosie Kurtz

Aug 20, 2014

    

  In Part Swan, Part Goose: An Uncommon Memoir of Womanhood, Work, and Family, Swoosie Kurtz shares just the right combination of personal misadventure and showbiz lore, candidly reflecting on the right choices that empowered her, the wrong choices that enlightened her, and the intimate journey of caring for an aging parent.

8/19/14 Panel

Aug 19, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock and Times Union Associate Editor, Mike Spain.

Topics include:
Jim Jeffords Dies at 80
Ferguson
Glens Falls Civic Center
Mail carriers at risk
The Cost of Raising A Child

Listener Essay - Red, Brown, And Navy Blue

Aug 14, 2014

  Kathy Curto is an Adjunct Professor of Writing at Montclair State University and her work has been published in The Inquisitive Eater, The Asbury Park Press, Italian Americana, VIA-Voices in Italian Americana, Lumina, The Mom Egg, Splash of Red and several newspapers covering the Hudson Valley. She holds a BA and an MFA from Sarah Lawrence College and an MSW from Hunter School of Social Work. In 2012 she was selected as one of the cast members of the first NYC Listen to Your Mother show, a national series of original live readings. Kathy lives in the Hudson Valley with her husband and their four children. This essay is also featured on Junk.

  Few things are as exciting—and potentially life-changing—as discovering an old letter. And while etiquette books still extol the practice, letter writing seems to be disappearing amid a flurry of e-mails, texting, and tweeting.

The recent decline in letter writing marks a cultural shift so vast that in the future historians may divide time not between BC and AD but between the eras when people wrote letters and when they did not. So New York Times bestselling author Simon Garfield asks: Can anything be done to revive a practice that has dictated and tracked the progress of civilization for more than five hundred years?

    Joseph Luzzi is the author of Romantic Europe and the Ghost of Italy, which won the Scaglione Prize for Italian Studies from the Modern Language Association. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, Bookforum, and The Times Literary Supplement. He has received an essay award from the Dante Society of America, a teaching prize from Yale College, and a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The first American-born child in his Italian family, he earned his doctorate from Yale University and is a professor at Bard College.

In his new book, My Two Italies, Joseph Luzzi - child of Italian immigrants and an award-winning scholar of Italian literature - straddles these two perspectives to link his family’s dramatic story to Italy’s north-south divide, its quest for a unifying language, and its passion for art, food, and family.

    Letters of Note: An Eclectic Collection of Correspondence Deserving of a Wider Audience is a collection of more than 125 letters offers a never-before-seen glimpse of the events and people of history—the brightest and best, the most notorious, and the endearingly everyday. It is compiled by Shaun Usher - as is the website of the same name.

From Virginia Woolf's heart-breaking suicide letter, to Queen Elizabeth II's recipe for drop scones sent to President Eisenhower; from the first recorded use of the expression 'OMG' in a letter to Winston Churchill, to Gandhi's appeal for calm to Hitler; and from Iggy Pop's beautiful letter of advice to a troubled young fan, to Leonardo da Vinci's remarkable job application letter, Letters of Note is a celebration of the power of written correspondence which captures the humour, seriousness, sadness and brilliance that make up all of our lives.

  In her new book, Rescuing Julia Twice, Tina Traster tells foreign-adoption story - from dealing with the bleak landscape and inscrutable adoption handlers in Siberia, to her feelings of inexperience and ambivalence at being a new mother in her early forties, to her growing realization over months then years that something was “not quite right” with her daughter, Julia, who remained cold and emotionally detached.

Flying Deer Day 6/21

Jun 13, 2014

  Flying Deer Nature Center in New Lebanon, NY has been mentoring children, teens, and families in the ways of the earth since 1995.

FDNC has distinguished itself through the creativity of its programs and its deep connections to nature. Programs operated by Flying Deer include wilderness adventures for women, weekly wilderness mentoring for boys, single gender adolescent rite of passage programs, and co-ed programs for homeschoolers.

Flying Deer also operates school-based nature studies programs at local public and private schools. Summer camp programs include nature-based fantasy adventures, canoe trips, day camps, backpacking, camping, and family over-nites.

    

  Mona Simpson is the acclaimed and award-winning author of Anywhere But Here and My Hollywood.

Miles Adler-Hart starts eavesdropping to find out what his mother is planning for his life. When he learns instead that his parents are separating, his investigation deepens, and he enlists his best friend, Hector, to help. Both boys are in thrall to Miles’s unsuspecting mother, Irene, who is “pretty for a mathematician.” They rifle through her dresser drawers, bug her telephone lines, and strip-mine her computer, only to find that all clues lead them to her bedroom, and put them on the trail of a mysterious stranger from Washington, D.C.

Their amateur detective work starts innocently but quickly takes them to the far reaches of adult privacy as they acquire knowledge that will affect the family’s well-being, prosperity, and sanity.

    

  In her new memoir, The Madwoman in the Volvo, writer and performer Sandra Tsing Loh tells the story of her personal roller coaster of menopause. It includes an affair with a married man, the explosion of her marriage, and the pressure of keeping her daughters off of Facebook while managing the legal and marital hijinks of her eighty-nine-year-old dad. 
 


Surprisingly, deeper research into the biological science of menopause suggests that this is all normal. Loh deduces that this midlife “madness” is less about menopause than about the madness of the world: trying to maintain appearances during an epic hormonal (physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual) change.

Sandra Tsing Loh is a contributing editor to The Atlantic and the author of five previous books. She is a regular commentator on NPR’s Morning Edition and PRI’s This American Life and has performed two solo shows off-Broadway.

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