Facial Recognition | WAMC

Facial Recognition

Vermont Attorney General T.J. Donovan announces lawsuit against Clearview AI
Pat Bradley/WAMC

The Vermont Attorney General’s office filed suit Tuesday in Chittenden Superior Court against a New York-based data collection company claiming it has illegally obtained photographs of Vermonters, violating their privacy rights as well as the state’s consumer protection and new data broker laws.

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    Police in the largest city in western Massachusetts will soon start wearing cameras as funds have now been approved to purchase the equipment.

WAMC

The city council in Springfield, Massachusetts has voted to ban police from using a controversial technology.   

WAMC

     The issue of face surveillance technology continues to divide elected officials in the largest city in western Massachusetts. 

      The city council in Springfield, Massachusetts could vote Monday to ban the government’s use of face surveillance technology.  WAMC’s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill reports.

    The largest city in western Massachusetts has taken a step toward banning local law enforcement from using a controversial technology.

WAMC

   

            The city council in Springfield, Massachusetts tonight is considering banning the use of facial recognition technology. 

WAMC

    Officials in the largest city in western Massachusetts are heatedly debating whether police should have access to a controversial technology.

Jesse Feiler - Emojis

Jul 23, 2019

World Emoji Day was last week. We didn’t want it to go by with notice. However, the day is much bigger than just your favorite emoji. World Emoji Day is a celebration of all emojis. So, we will talk about the power of emojis with our tech guru, Jesse Feiler.

Jesse Feiler helps people and organizations get to know and use new technologies. Projects have included building the page caching module for the Prodigy Web Browser for Mac in the very early days of the Web, location-based apps for iPhone and iOS, as well as books and classes on new technologies. His latest book is “Implementing iOS and macOS Documents with the Files App: Managing Files and ensuring compatibility.”

WAMC's Dr. Alan Chartock discusses reports that President Trump has abandoned efforts to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census. 

Vermont Attorney General T.J. Donovan
VT AG T.J. Donovan/Facebook

Vermont was one of a few states cited by the Georgetown Law Center on Privacy and Technology that allowed the federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement and other federal law enforcement agencies access to its Department of Motor Vehicle facial recognition software. That’s according to the New York Times and the Washington Post. In 2017, Vermont’s governor ordered the DMV to stop sharing the information after state Attorney General T.J. Donovan determined the practice violated state law.  In the second part of our interview with Donovan, he explains to WAMC North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley that while the state has suspended sharing biometric data, it still collaborates with federal agencies and law enforcement on a number of issues.

Vermont Attorney General T.J. Donovan
VT AG T.J. Donovan/Facebook

Reporting by the New York Times and the Washington Post this week review a study by the Georgetown Law Center on Privacy and Technology that assessed how federal law enforcement agencies accessed state motor vehicle facial recognition databases.  Among the states that provided information was Vermont, which provides a driver’s privilege card to undocumented workers in the state.  Vermont Attorney General T.J. Donovan says his office became aware of the practice in early 2017. After researching, they found it was a violation of state law and Governor Phil Scott ordered the DMV to stop sharing information with federal agencies.  Donovan, a Democrat, tells WAMC North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley that sharing the facial recognition database has been suspended since 2017.

The Vermont governor's office says the state's Department of Motor Vehicles stopped sharing facial recognition information with federal immigration authorities more than two years ago.

Amid efforts to seek equal pay, WAMC's Dr. Alan Chartock discusses the U.S. Women's National Team's fourth Women's World Cup win.

Facial recognition technology is still in its infancy.

Dr. Megan Papesh, assistant professor of psychology at Louisiana State University, is demonstrating weakness in a system many people may assume is completely secure.