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Book cover for "The Last Million"
http://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/ / http://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/

Historian David Nasaw’s new book, "The Last Million: Europe’s Displaced Persons from World War to Cold War," turns his attention to the gripping yet until now largely hidden story of the one million refugees left behind in Germany following the end of World War II.

Ruta Sepetys is an internationally acclaimed, New York Times bestselling author of historical fiction published in over sixty countries and forty languages. Sepetys is considered a "crossover" novelist, as her books are read by both teens and adults worldwide.

In her latest work, "The Fountains of Silence," Sepetys shines light into one of history’s darkest corners in a novel about identity, unforgettable love, repercussions of war, and the hidden violence of silence–inspired by the true postwar struggles of Spain.

In Peter Steiner's novel "The Good Cop" it's 1920 in Munich. Detective Willi Geismeier has a problem: how do you uphold the law when the law goes bad? The First World War has been lost and Germany is in turmoil. The new government in Berlin is weak. The police and courts are corrupt. Fascists and Communists are fighting in the streets. People want a savior, someone who can make Germany great again. To many, Adolf Hitler seems perfect for the job.

When the offices of a Munich newspaper are bombed, Willi Geismeier investigates, but as it gets political, he is taken off the case. Willi continues to ask questions, but when his pursuit of the truth itself becomes a crime, his career and his life are in grave danger.

Peter Steiner is the author of the critically acclaimed Louis Morgon series of crime novels. He is also a cartoonist for The New Yorker Magazine.

Hudson Hall in Hudson, New York is presenting a reading and panel discussion to celebrate the publication of Hudson and Brooklyn-based artist and author Daniel Rothbart’s "Seeing Naples: Reports from the Shadow of Vesuvius."

The book of travel writing is inspired by Rothbart’s experiences as a Fulbright scholar in Naples during the early 1990’s, and combines personal narrative with stories from the city’s history, ancient and modern, that speak to Neapolitan values and culture.

"In Putin’s Footsteps: Searching for the Soul of an Empire Across Russia's Eleven Time Zones" is Nina Khrushcheva and Jeffrey Tayler’s unique combination of travelogue, current affairs, and history, showing how Russia’s dimensions have shaped its identity and culture through the decades.

With exclusive insider status as Nikita Khrushchev’s great grand-daughter, and an ex-pat living and reporting on Russia and the Soviet Union since 1993, Nina Khrushcheva and Jeffrey Tayler offer a poignant exploration of the largest country on earth through their recreation of Vladimir Putin’s fabled New Year’s Eve speech planned across all eleven time zones.

The Clark Art Institute’s summer 2018 exhibition, “Women Artists in Paris, 1850–1900,” celebrates an international group of artists who overcame gender-based restrictions to make extraordinary creative strides, taking important steps in the fight for a more egalitarian art world. It is on view in Williamstown through September 3.

In addition to “Women Artists in Paris,” The Clark is the exclusive venue for the exhibition “The Art of Iron: Objects from the Musée Le Secq des Tournelles, Rouen, Normandy.” The exhibition presents thirty-six historic objects in an installation celebrating the craft and beauty of wrought iron. That exhibition is on view through September 16th.

(Left) Grille, Italian, 18th century. Wrought iron, polychromed, 33 7/8 x 25 5/8 x 1 5/8 in. Réunion des Musées Métropolitains, Rouen, Normandy, LS.4513 (Right) Circular Grille, French (Amiens), c. 1700. Wrought iron and rolled iron, cut and embossed, 39 3/8 diameter x 2 3/4 in. Réunion des Musées Métropolitains, Rouen, Normandy, LS.4231 Edit | Remove

cybersecurity graphic
Pixabay/Public Domain

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning as we discuss recent news from the world of privacy and personal data.

Jesse Feiler is an app developer, author, and consultant specializing in small business and nonprofit organizations. His most recent books are “The Nonprofit Risk Book: Finding and Managing Risk in Nonprofits and NGOs” written with Gail B. Nayowith and “Learn Computer Science with Swift.” His most recent apps are “CyberContinuity,” a free app to learn about your vulnerabilities and “The Nonprofit Risk App,” a companion to the book.

Online Privacy
lawgazette.co.uk

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning as we discuss privacy regulations and what's new in Facebook's upcoming discussions.

Jesse Feiler is an app developer, author, and consultant specializing in small business and nonprofit organizations. His most recent books are “The Nonprofit Risk Book: Finding and Managing Risk in Nonprofits and NGOs” written with Gail B. Nayowith and “Learn Computer Science with Swift.” His most recent apps are “CyberContinuity,” a free app to learn about your vulnerabilities and “The Nonprofit Risk App,” a companion to the book.

After her mother is shot at a checkpoint, fifteen-year-old Sarah meets a mysterious man with an ambiguous accent, a suspiciously bare apartment, and a lockbox full of weapons. He's part of the secret resistance against the Third Reich, and he needs Sarah to hide in plain sight at a school for the daughters of top Nazi brass, posing as one of them.

If she can befriend the daughter of a key scientist and get invited to her house, she might be able to steal the blueprints to a bomb that could destroy the cities of Western Europe. Nothing could prepare Sarah for her cutthroat schoolmates, and soon she finds herself in a battle for survival unlike any she'd ever imagined. But anyone who underestimates this innocent-seeming girl does so at their peril. She may look sweet, but she's the Nazis' worst nightmare.

Matt Killeen's new novel is "Orphan Monster Spy."

  Despite the outpouring of books, movies, museums, memorials, and courses devoted to the Holocaust, a coherent explanation of why such ghastly carnage erupted from the heart of civilized Europe in the twentieth century still seems elusive even seventy years later. 

Peter Hayes' Why? dispels many misconceptions and answers some of the most basic, yet vexing, questions that remain: why the Jews and not another ethnic group? Why the Germans? Why such a swift and sweeping extermination? Why didn’t more Jews fight back more often? Why didn’t they receive more help?

Peter Hayes is professor of history and German and Theodore Zev Weiss Holocaust Educational Foundation Professor of Holocaust Studies Emeritus at Northwestern University and chair of the Academic Committee of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Can Europe prosper without the euro?

In 2010, the 2008 global financial crisis morphed into the “eurocrisis.” It has not abated. The 19 countries of Europe that share the euro currency―the eurozone―have been rocked by economic stagnation and debt crises. Some countries have been in depression for years while the governing powers of the eurozone have careened from emergency to emergency, most notably in Greece.

In The Euro, Nobel Prize–winning economist and best-selling author Joseph E. Stiglitz dismantles the prevailing consensus around what ails Europe, demolishing the champions of austerity while offering a series of plans that can rescue the continent―and the world―from further devastation.

He also revised his past best-seller: Globalization and Its Discontents, now titled Globalization and Its Discontents Revisited: Anti-Globalization in the Era of Trump. 

Once-ascendant right-wing parties in Europe appear to be on the defensive.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science, wraps up his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

It’s a volatile time in Europe.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Congressman Richard Neal wraps up his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock. 

Lisa Dickey traveled across the whole of Russia three times - in 1995, 2005 and 2015 - making friends in eleven different cities, then coming back again and again to see how their lives had changed. Like the acclaimed British documentary series Seven Up!, she traces the ups and downs of ordinary people’s lives, in the process painting a deeply nuanced portrait of modern Russia.

Her book is Bears in the Streets: Three Journeys across a Changing Russia.

Herbert London: Europe’s Migration Cancer

Jan 27, 2016

Roberta Flack, years earlier, sang what has become the Europeans theme song “Killing Me Softly.” Despite the reported wilding spree of at least a thousand North African refugees who groped women at the New Year celebration in Cologne, Germany, despite allegations of two rapes, despite condemnation by Prime Minister Merkel, the mayor of the city has requested that women monitor their “code of conduct.” Apparently German authorities will contest to their last breath that tolerance dedication will not yield. This is the tolerance that kills, softly at first and violently in time.

  The refugee crisis in Europe has confounded much of the world. 

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut representative Joe Courtney tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that his office worked with a Syrian refugee family a couple of years back.

  Raised like a princess in one of the most powerful families in the American South, Henrietta Bingham was offered the helm of a publishing empire. Instead, she ripped through the Jazz Age like an F. Scott Fitzgerald character: intoxicating and intoxicated, selfish and shameless, seductive and brilliant, endearing and often terribly troubled.

In New York, Louisville, and London, she drove both men and women wild with desire, and her youth blazed with sex. But her love affairs with women made her the subject of derision and caused a doctor to try to cure her queerness. After the speed and pleasure of her early days, the toxicity of judgment from others coupled with her own anxieties resulted in years of addiction and breakdowns.

Emily Bingham, the great-niece of Henrietta Bingham, writes about her life in Irrepressible: The Jazz Age Life of Henrietta Bingham.

  Once Upon a Time in Russia by Ben Mezrich is the untold true story of the larger-than-life billionaire oligarchs who surfed the waves of privatization to reap riches after the fall of the Soviet regime: “Godfather of the Kremlin” Boris Berezovsky, a former mathematician whose first entrepreneurial venture was running an automobile reselling business, and Roman Abramovich, his dashing young protégé who built a multi-billion-dollar empire of oil and aluminum.

Locked in a complex, uniquely Russian partnership, Berezovsky and Abramovich battled their way through the “Wild East” of Russia with Berezovsky acting as the younger man’s krysha—literally, his roof, his protector. 

4/21/15 Panel

Apr 21, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Professor, Rosemary Armao, and essayist, author, editor and activist - Barbara Smith.

Scheduled topics include: EU Migrant Crisis; Baltimore Arrest Spinal Cord Death; Breast Cancer Numbers; Standardized Testing; 2015 Pulitzer Prizes.

The French Revolution challenged the foundation of the social order in essentially every political structure in Europe. In his new book, Phantom Terror: Political Paranoia and the Creation of the Modern State, 1789-1848, historian Adam Zamoyski examines the years after the French Revolution when conservative governments from Britain to Russia responded to France’s Revolution. With the hope of protecting their own power against the threat of rebellion, they implemented various forces which policed both the speech and actions of civilians.

Although Zamoyski focuses on a fixed period in human history, his novel provides a fascinating insight into how human beings operate when motivated by power.

  The modern-day European Union was crafted in large part to minimize built-in geopolitical tensions that historically have torn it apart.

As George Friedman demonstrates in Flashpoints: The Emerging Crisis In Europe, with a mix of rich history and cultural analysis, that design is failing.

  When Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address in 1863, he had broader aims than simply rallying a war-weary nation. Lincoln realized that the Civil War had taken on a wider significance—that all of Europe and Latin America was watching to see whether the United States, a beleaguered model of democracy, would indeed “perish from the earth.”

In The Cause of All Nations: An International History of the American Civil War, distinguished historian Don H. Doyle explains that the Civil War was viewed abroad as part of a much larger struggle for democracy that spanned the Atlantic Ocean, and had begun with the American and French Revolutions.

12/30/14 Panel

Dec 30, 2014

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Associate Editor of the Times Union, Mike Spain, and political consultant Libby Post.

Topics include Afghanistan War ending, Steve Scalise of Louisiana Acknowledges Addressing Racist Group, and the ferry fire off the coast of Greece.

    In the late summer of 1918, after four long years of senseless, stagnant fighting, the Western Front erupted. The bitter four-month struggle that ensued—known as the Hundred Days Campaign—saw some of the bloodiest and most ferocious combat of the Great War, as the Allies grimly worked to break the stalemate in the west and end the conflict that had decimated Europe.

  Europe’s financial fortunes have a major influence on the rest of the world.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Democratic Representative Richard Neal tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that Ireland is making a slow comeback.

Rep. Peter Welch
photo provided

    Europe’s financial fortunes have influenced the world economy for years. In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont representative Peter Welch and WAMC’s Alan Chartock discuss Welch’s study group on Europe.

Anne Appllebaum is a columnist for The Washington Post and Slate. Her book, Gulag, won the Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction and was a finalist for three other major prizes. Her essays appear in The New York Review of Books, Slate, and The London Spectator.

Acclaimed biographer Anne Sebba offers the first full scale biography of Wallis Simpson, exploring the mind of one of the most glamorous and reviled figures of the 20th century--and one of the most talked about women of her generation. Anne Sebba will join us this week to discuss That Woman.

We welcome Piers Paul Read (Alive: The Story of the Andes Survivors) to the show and speak with him about The Dreyfus Affair: The Scandal That Tore France in Two.

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