equal rights | WAMC

equal rights

Julie Suk is a legal scholar and author of the new book, “We The Women: The Unstoppable Mothers of the Equal Rights Amendment” and is a frequent commentator in the media on legal issues affecting women, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, Vox, and CBS News. She is currently a Visiting Professor at Yale Law School.

In the new book, she excavates the ERA’s past to guide its future, explaining how the ERA can address hot-button issues such as pregnancy discrimination, sexual harassment, and unequal pay. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg plays a big part in that story and Julie’s book.

Angie Maxwell is the Director of the Diane D. Blair Center of Southern Politics and Society, an associate professor of political science, and holder of the Diane D. Blair Endowed Professorship in Southern Studies at the University of Arkansas. Maxwell and Dean of the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences and a professor of political science at the University of Arkansas Todd Shields have written the new book "The Long Southern Strategy: How Chasing White Voters in the South Changed American Politics."

Elaine Weiss’ new book, "The Woman’s Hour: The Great Fight to Win the Vote," rediscovers the story of American women rising up to claim their rights, as their long fight for the vote reaches its climax in 1920. This story resonates today as a surge of women's political activism reshapes the national conversation, sweeping a record number of women into city halls, state legislatures, the halls of Congress, and the 2020 contest for the White House.

The electoral “Pink Wave” of 2018 would not have been possible if not for the white and yellow wave of suffrage activists taking to the streets more than a century ago. In recent op-eds for the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Time, Daily Beast, and Lenny Letter, Elaine Weiss has written compelling commentaries linking today's headlines to historical precedent, drawn from her extensive research.

Starting tomorrow, the New York State Museum is opening an exhibition celebrating the centennial of women’s suffrage in NY titled Votes for Women: Celebrating New York’s Suffrage Centennial. Monday - November 6th - is the 100th anniversary date of women’s suffrage in NY.

Votes for Women celebrates the centennial of women’s suffrage in New York State and raise public awareness of the struggle for women’s suffrage and equal rights in New York State from the 1848 Seneca Falls Conven­tion through 1917 when New York State granted women the right to vote.

The exhibition also addresses the nationally significant role of New York State leaders in regards to women’s rights and the feminist movement through the early 21st century. 

The curators of the exhibition are Jennifer Lemak and Ashley Hopkins-Benton and they join us in studio.

  How did gay and lesbian couples’ right to marry go from unthinkable to inevitable? How did the individual right to bear arms, dismissed as fraudulent by Chief Justice Warren Burger in 1990, become a constitutional right in 2008? And what compelled President George W. Bush to rein in many of his initiatives in the war on terror before leaving office, even though past presidents have had a free hand in wartime? We are likely to answer that, in each case, the Supreme Court remade our nation’s most fundamental law.

Yet as the award-winning legal scholar David Cole argues in Engines of Liberty, citizen activists are the true drivers of constitutional change.

  Rev. Dr. William J. Barber, II serves as President of the North Carolina NAACP and convener of the Forward Together Moral Movement, an alliance of more than 200 progressive organizations in North Carolina.

The Forward Together Moral Movement, better known as “Moral Monday,” is a multi-racial, multi-generational movement to battle immoral, extreme policies adopted by the governor and state legislature.

The North Carolina NAACP and the Forward Together Moral Movement are now engaged in litigation to reverse the worst voter suppression laws in the country. Barber is the author of the book The Third Reconstruction: Moral Mondays, Fusion Politics and the Rise of a New Justice Movement.

He will be speaking as part of The Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King Lecture Series on Nonviolent Social Change at Siena College Wednesday 3/30 at 7PM. His talk is titled: “Moral Dissenters are a Necessity for the Destiny, Choosing the Path to Higher Ground.”

  In Mea Culpa: Lessons on Law and Regret from U.S. History, Steven W. Bender examines how the United States’ collective shame about its past has shaped the evolution of law and behavior.

We regret slavery and segregationist Jim Crow laws. We eventually apologize, while ignoring other oppressions, and our legal response to regret often fails to be transformative for the affected groups.