Environment | WAMC

Environment

Book cover for "Can I Recyle This?"
Penguin Books

Since the dawn of the recycling system, we have stood by their bins, holding an everyday object, wondering, "can I recycle this?" This simple question reaches into our concern for the environment, the care we take to keep our homes and our communities clean, and how we interact with our local government.

Jennie Romer’s new book, "Can I Recycle This?" gives straightforward answers to whether dozens of common household objects can or cannot be recycled, as well as the information you need to make that decision for anything else you encounter.

Jennie Romer has been working for years to help cities and states across America better deal with the waste we produce, helping draft legislation to help communities better process their waste and produce less of it in the first place.

Book cover for "The Climate Diet" (grass green background with text)
Penguin Books

Paul Greenberg is the author of the James Beard Award-winning bestseller "Four Fish," "American Catch," and "The Omega Principle," and a regular contributor to The New York Times.

His new book is "The Climate Diet: 50 Simple Ways to Trim Your Carbon Footprint."

Barn silos
Pat Bradley/WAMC

Vermont Lieutenant Governor Molly Gray has been holding a series of themed roundtables to bring attention to what she says are critical issues for the state.  Her latest “Seat at the Table” featured a panel discussion on climate change and sustainable food systems.

Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are:
WAMC’s Alan Chartock
Judith Enck - Former EPA Regional Administrator, Visiting Professor at Bennington College, President of Beyond Plastics
Jeff Goodell - long-time contributing editor at Rolling Stone, where he has been writing about climate change for more than a decade. His most recent book is The Water Will Come: Rising Seas, Sinking Cities, and the Remaking of the Civilized World. In 2020 he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship
Elizabeth Kolbert - staff writer at The New Yorker since 1999 and won a Pulitzer Prize for her book, "The Sixth Extinction." Her latest book “Under a White Sky: The Nature of the Future” came out in February

Book cover for "Transient Desires"
Grove Atlantic

In his many years as a commissario, Guido Brunetti has seen all manner of crime and known intuitively how to navigate the various pathways in his native city, Venice, to discover the person responsible.

Now, in "Transient Desires," the thirtieth novel in Donna Leon's mystery series, he faces a heinous crime committed outside his jurisdiction. He is drawn in innocently enough: two young American women have been badly injured in a boating accident, joy riding in the Laguna with two young Italians.

On Monday, March 15 at 5 p.m., Joe Donahue will be having a virtual book talk with Donna Leon in an Odyssey Bookstore event.

Book cover for "How to Prepare for Climate Change"
Simon & Schuster / Simon & Schuster

In "How to Prepare for Climate Change," bestselling self-help author David Pogue offers sensible, deeply researched advice for how the rest of us should start to ready ourselves for the years ahead. Pogue walks readers through what to grow, what to eat, how to build, how to insure, where to invest, how to prepare your children and pets, and even where to consider relocating when the time comes. 

David Pogue is the host of twenty science specials on PBS NOVA, a five-time Emmy Award–winning technology and science correspondent for CBS Sunday Morning, and a New York Times bestselling author. 

He will present a Zoom webinar for The Salisbury Forum entitled "Are YOU Prepared for Climate Change?" on Friday, February 5 at 7:30 p.m. ET.

Book cover for "Planetary Health"
islandpress.org / islandpress.org

Dr. Sam Myers is a Principal Research Scientist at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and founding Director of the Planetary Health Alliance. He joins us now to tell us about the new book he has co-edited: "Planetary Health: Protecting Nature to Protect Ourselves."

Human activity is driving the fastest changes in our global environment in the history of our species, and these planetary changes threaten the very foundations of human health by affecting the quality of our air and water, the amount and quality of the food we produce, our exposure to infectious disease and natural hazards, even the habitability of the places we live.

Dr. Myers says to address these threats, we need to establish a different trajectory. The good news is that we know how to do everything differently—across every sector we have powerful solutions that can be taken to scale—the question is will we? Planetary Health lays out the science and the politics behind the challenges as well as the potential solutions.

In "The Future We Choose," Christiana Figueres and Tom Rivett-Carnac, who led negotiations for the United Nations during the historic Paris Agreement of 2015, have written a cautionary but optimistic book about the world's changing climate and the fate of humanity.

The authors outline two possible scenarios for our planet. In one, they describe what life on Earth will be like by 2050 if we fail to meet the Paris climate targets. In the other, they lay out what it will be like to live in a carbon neutral, regenerative world.

Tom Rivett-Carnac joined us.

Joe Donahue:  In an isolated estate on the Atlantic coast storms are brewing, waters are rising, and the world as we know it is inexorably shifting. This is the reality of Lydia Millet’s new novel, “A Children's Bible”, where a pack of kids and their middle aged parents are coexisting at this summer estate. The novel turns steadily darker as climate collapse and societal breakdown encroach. Millet is a senior editor at the Center for Biological Diversity, who regularly tackles environmental issues in her op-eds for the “New York Times”. She has long foregrounded the costs of climate change in her fiction, and “A Children's Bible” with scenes of quarantine and societal breakdown is no different. She has written 12 works of fiction including “Sweet Lamb of Heaven”, “Mermaids in Paradise” and “Love in Infant Monkeys”. 

Joe Donahue: On March 19, NOAA issued a report that indicated 23 states in the U.S. should expect to have major flooding this spring. Of those 23 states, all of the ones located along the Mississippi are forecasted to have moderate to severe flooding events.

Simon Winchester’s newest is "The End of The River: Why the Long Struggle to Hold Back The Mississippi May Soon Be Lost, Wreaking Trillion-Dollar Chaos Across The American South."

The story includes the history of the Mississippi River, the engineering feat that keeps its shores at bay, and the impending environmental disaster that one catastrophic rainy season could bring.

Simon Winchester's many books include "The Professor and the Madman," "The Map that Changed the World," "Krakatoa; and A Crack in the Edge of the World." 

        The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are:

WAMC's Alan Chartock

Judith Enck - Senior Fellow and Visiting Professor at Bennington College, Founder of Beyond Plastics, former EPA regional administrator.

Jeff Goodell - is a long-time contributing editor at Rolling Stone, where he has been writing about climate change for more than a decade. His most recent book is The Water Will Come: Rising Seas, Sinking Cities, and the Remaking of the Civilized World. Earlier this month he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship.

Elizabeth Kolbert - has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1999 and won a Pulitzer Prize for her book, "The Sixth Extinction."

As humanity marches on, causing mass extinctions and destabilizing the climate, the future of Earth will very much reflect the stories that Homo sapiens decides to jettison or accept today into our collective identity. At this pivotal moment in history, the most important story we can be telling ourselves is that humans are not inherently destructive.

In "Changing Tides" Alejandro Frid tackles the big questions: who, or what, represents our essential selves, and what stories might allow us to shift the collective psyche of industrial civilization in time to avert the worst of the climate and biodiversity crises?

This week, three Vermont environmental groups outlined climate priorities they believe the Vermont Legislature should consider this session.

Terry Tempest Williams is renowned for her singular body of literature on the environment and our experiences of home.  Her new book “Erosion: Essays of Undoing,” explores this connection, particularly to her home state of Utah, as an evolutionary process and how our undoing of the self, self-centeredness, extractive capitalism, fear, tribalism can also be our becoming, creating room for change and progress.

On Thursday, October 10, Bard College will feature author Isabella Tree presenting her new work “Wilding: Returning Nature to Our Farm,” winner of the 2019 Richard Jefferies prize for nature writing and chosen by Smithsonian as a top 10 science book for 2018.

The event takes place at 5 p.m., in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center and is is sponsored by the Bard Center for Civic Engagement, Office of Sustainability, Environmental and Urban Studies Program, and Lifetime Learning Institute.

Isabella Tree writes for publications such as National Geographic, Granta, and the Guardian, and is the author of five nonfiction books. Her latest book charts the story of the pioneering rewilding project in West Sussex where she lives with her husband.

More than 200 years after Thomas Jefferson proclaimed Lake George to be the most beautiful water he ever saw, the Lake remains one of the clearest, cleanest lakes in the nation. But that doesn’t mean it’s without its challenges. In fact, invasive species; aging wastewater treatment plants and septic systems; stormwater runoff; and winter road salt all pose very real threats to the long-term health of the lake’s ecology and the Lake George Region’s economy.

The FUND for Lake George is dedicated to preventing these threats from devastating the lake. Guided by data from the world’s most advanced environmental monitoring system, The Jefferson Project, as well as additional FUND research, the not-for-profit organization is leading a multi-faceted, science-to-solutions effort to keep the 32-mile-long tourism mecca and drinking water source clear of harmful algal blooms and other threats, and providing a roadmap for other lakeside communities across the country.

Executive Director of The FUND for Lake George Eric Siy and CEO of Fort William Henry Corp. in Lake George and Chair of The FUND’s Council of Business Advisors Kathy Flacke Muncil join us to tell us more.

Plattsburgh City Hall
WAMC Photo

In April, Plattsburgh Mayor Colin Read issued a plan to address energy and the environment that included the creation of a sustainability committee. The new group met for the first time this week and outlined intentions to obtain a grant to review and inventory the city’s greenhouse gas emissions.

Basilica Hudson’s new Green Energy Fair will take place this Sunday, April 14 from noon to 5 p.m. in Hudson, New York.

Produced in partnership with pioneering environmental organizations SunCommon and CYCLEffect Regenerative Ventures, the Green Energy Fair pairs a marketplace of new energy leaders and environmental advocates with an afternoon of presentations and discussions by community leaders and alternative energy experts.

Free and open to the public, this annual program will invite attendees to come together to seek solutions for the greatest communal challenge now facing us, the climate and energy crisis.

We are joined by Melissa Auf der Maur, Co-Founder and Director of Basilica Hudson, Chris Lindstrom, Director of CYCLEffect, and Jeff Irish, VP & General Manager of SunCommon.

pipeline
loe.org

Residents are set to protest tonight at a hearing on a proposed gas pipeline in East Greenbush.

In California, wildfires now rage year-round, destroying thousands of homes. Across the US, “500-year” storms pummel communities month after month, and floods displace tens of millions annually. This is only a preview of the changes to come. And they are coming fast. Without a revolution in how billions of humans conduct their lives, parts of the Earth could become close to uninhabitable, and other parts horrifically inhospitable, as soon as the end of this century.

In "The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming," David Wallace-Wells brings into stark relief the climate troubles that await: food shortages, refugee emergencies, and other crises that will reshape the globe.

David Wallace-Wells is a national fellow at the New America foundation and a columnist and deputy editor at New York magazine.

3/1/19 Panel

Mar 1, 2019

 

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Former EPA Regional Administrator Judith Enck, and Siena College Economics Professor Aaron Pacitti.

Courtesy of Bard College

A college in New York’s Hudson Valley has established a program that aims to develop solutions to local and regional environmental problems.

Rep. Peter Welch
photo provided

Democrats have been promoting a Green New Deal.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont Representative Peter Welch wraps up his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Adirondacks Elk Lake Dix Mountain
Pat Bradley/WAMC

The funeral for the 41st President of the United States was held in Washington today. While George Herbert Walker Bush leaves a mixed environmental legacy, northern New York advocates says his tenure as president benefitted the environmentally-sensitive Adirondack region.

Lesley-Anne Dupigny-Giroux
Photo by Sally McCay / University of Vermont

On Friday, the federal government released the Fourth National Climate Assessment.  The report determines that if intensive actions are not taken to curb greenhouse gas emissions and regional initiatives implemented to adapt, there will be severe ramifications for the climate and human health, infrastructure and the economy. The report presents overall findings and also breaks into segments to assess the impacts on areas such as agriculture, transportation, air quality and human health.  It telescopes to individual regions of the country, finding, among other things, that the Northeast’s seasonality is at risk, which in turn threatens the region’s economy.   Vermont state climatologist and University of Vermont Professor of Geography Lesley-Anne Dupigny-Giroux is the lead author of the Northeast chapter of the Fourth National Climate Assessment.  She  was selected from among 200 scientists to lead the Northeast chapter.

Filmmaker and activist Josh Fox looks to answer many questions through art and literature. The big question is what will the future hold?

In his first book, "The Truth Has Changed" Josh Fox examines two major shifts in the world, climate change and the way we process information. Josh Fox is the editor, director, and narrator of the Oscar nominated, Emmy-award winning film "Gasland". Fox is performing,"The Truth Has Changed" as a one man spoken-word act.

Musician Michael Hollis joins us to tell us about his Arts Mid-Hudson grant-funded symphonic composition that is being performed at this year's O+ Festival on Friday, October 5 at 10 p.m. and Saturday, October 6 at 1 p.m. in Kingston, New York at the Old Dutch Church.

The piece is entitled "The Edge of the Hill" and is a four movement piece centered around the beautiful environment of Ulster County and what its different community members do to preserve and protect it. Hollis interviewed people that are being used both concretely and abstractly in the music itself. 

Coastal fog can bring more than a nice view — it can also act as a vector for microbes. That’s according to a recent report published in the journal Science of the Total Environment.

New England and eastern Canadian provincial flags
Pat Bradley/WAMC

A small group of protesters held signs and milled about the entry to the Stowe Mountain Lodge earlier this week as governors and premiers from around the Northeast met inside.

New England Governors and Eastern Canadian Premiers meet in Stowe, VT
Pat Bradley/WAMC

At a fragile time in U.S.-Canada relations, the New England Governors and Eastern Canadian Premiers held their 42nd annual meeting in Stowe, Vermont this week.

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