elections | WAMC

elections

Bryan Griffin: One Person, One Vote

May 20, 2020

Will the coronavirus pandemic take the American election system’s integrity as another casualty?

Mixed Election Reaction From New York Leaders

Nov 6, 2019
Childhood sexual abuse survivor Richard Tollner meets with Governor Andrew Cuomo shortly before the Child Victims Act was to be voted on at the State Capitol.
Matt Ryan/New York Now

Reaction from New York’s politicians and political parties on this year’s election results is mixed.

Professor Joshua A. Douglas, an expert on our electoral system, joined us to present an encouraging assessment of current efforts to make our voting system more accessible, reliable, and effective. His new book is: "Vote for US: How to Take Back Our Elections and Change the Future of Voting."

In contrast to the anxiety surrounding our voting system, with stories about voter suppression and manipulation, there are actually quite a few positive initiatives toward voting rights reform. Douglas says regular Americans are working to take back their democracy, one community at a time.

Douglas is a professor at the University of Kentucky College of Law. His most recent scholarship focuses on the constitutional right to vote, with an emphasis on state constitutions, as well as the various laws, rules, and judicial decisions impacting election administration.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos
photo provided

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos, who is also the immediate past president of the National Association of Secretaries of State, is calling on Congress to protect election security in a strongly-worded statement.

wikipedia commons

The state's top elections official says more people cast ballots in the Nov. 6 election than in any previous midterm election in Massachusetts.

Anthony Salvanto, PhD, is CBS News Director of Elections and Surveys. He currently conducts all polling across the nation, states, and congressional races, and heads the Decision Desk that projects outcomes on Election Nights. He appears regularly on Face the Nation, the CBS Evening News, CBS This Morning, and more. "Where Did You Get This Number?" is his first book.

Salvanto’s job to understand you—what you think and how you vote. He’s the person behind so many of the poll numbers you see today, making the winner calls on election nights and surveying thousands of Americans. In "Where Did You Get This Number? A Pollster’s Guide to Making Sense of the World," Salvanto takes readers on a fast-paced, eye-opening tour through the world of polling and elections and what they really show about America today, beyond the who's-up-who’s-down headlines and horse races. Salvanto is just the person to bring much-needed clarity in a time when divisions seem to run so deep.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos
photo provided

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos is the president-elect of the National Association of Secretaries of State.  A key priority he plans to focus on is election security. In March, he testified before the U.S. Select Committee on Intelligence on the topic and this week the Democrat returned to testify before the Senate Committee on Rules and Administration.

If Democrats want to flip the House, they’ll have to do some work in upstate New York.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays wraps up his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos
photo provided

Vermont’s Secretary of State appeared before a U.S. Senate committee Wednesday to discuss election cyber security.

In The Once and Future Liberal, Mark Lilla offers an impassioned, tough-minded, and stinging look at the failure of American liberalism over the past two generations. Although there have been Democrats in the White House, and some notable policy achievements, for nearly 40 years the vision that Ronald Reagan offered—small government, lower taxes, and self-reliant individualism—has remained the country’s dominant political ideology. And the Democratic Party has offered no convincing competing vision in response.

Mark Lilla is a political scientist, journalist and professor of humanities at Columbia University. His newest book is The Once and Future Liberal: After Identity Politics.

wikipedia.org

While primaries in municipalities like Westchester County and Albany may draw a number of voters to the polls for major races today, in some counties there are only down ticket races.  In northern New York’s Clinton and Essex Counties, most primary races for local offices haven’t sparked massive interest.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos
photo provided

On June 28th, the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity sent a letter to all state Secretaries of State requesting voter information.  The commission is charged through a presidential executive order to study alleged voter fraud in the 2016 election.  But many states are balking.  Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos initially said he would provide only publicly available information.  This week, he changed his mind and determined he would not send any voter information to the commission.

ballot box
Wikimedia Commons

It’s election season in southern Berkshire County. Here's a round up.

The New York attorney general's office plans to operate a complaint hotline to address voter problems in Tuesday's congressional primaries.

Listener Essay - I Liked Ike

Jun 23, 2016

    

  This listener essay is by Steve Lewis. 

I Liked Ike

I liked Ike. He looked like a nice man on the red, white and blue button I saw on someone’s lapel at the Bohack’s. Somebody’s grandpa. He also looked kind of snappy saluting the troops in that tan Army uniform on the newsreels at the Roslyn Movie Theater.

My parents, Jewish immigrants from the boroughs, liked Stevenson, the tall bald guy famous for having a hole in the sole of his shoe. They said, with that adult shake of the head, that he was “very smart, very smart,” which I figured meant that Ike was probably not so sharp. So when my first grade teacher asked who we were voting for I made the brainy choice and raised my right hand for Adlai, my left hand pushing my right elbow up above Joan Nordlinger’s hand waving furiously next to mine. But I privately hoped the nice man with a kindly smile on the button would win.

Donald Trump at the Flynn Theatre
Pat Bradley/WAMC

Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump will make a campaign appearance in Plattsburgh ahead of the state's April 19 primary.

  Special interest groups increasingly control every level of government. The necessity of raising huge sums of campaign cash has completely changed the character of politics and policy making, determining what elected representatives stand for and how they spend their time. The marriage of great wealth and intense political influence has rendered our country unable to address our most pressing problems, from runaway government spending to climate change to the wealth gap. 

In Nation on the Take: How Big Money Corrupts Our Democracy and What We Can Do About It , Wendell Potter and Nick Penniman, two vigilant watchdogs, expose legalized corruption and link it to the kitchen-table issues citizens face every day.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

Recently re-elected Democratic Saratoga Springs Mayor Joanne Yepsen, joined by Democratic Party officials from the surrounding region, introduced the latest candidate to enter the race for New York’s 43rd Senate District.

“And I now proudly introduce Shaun Francis!” said Yepsen.

Francis, a native of the Capital Region, is making his run for the state senate his first foray into politics. The 36-year-old addressed his crowd of supporters at the Saratoga Hilton saying he is seeking to bring a change to the state legislature.

Senator Jeanne Shaheen
U.S. Senate

It’s less than a month until the first votes will be cast in the presidential primary campaign, with the early contests in Iowa and New Hampshire. New Hampshire U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen is a staunch supporter of Hilary Clinton’s bid.  In September, she endorsed the former Senator and Secretary of State. Clinton won in New Hampshire in 2008, but Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is right next door and popular in the state.  Shaheen is one of the Clinton campaign’s most stalwart spokespeople. With the polls tightening in Iowa and New Hampshire, Senator Shaheen discussed the race with WAMC’s North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley.

flickr

It will be a busy election night in Saratoga Springs. With four contested races for City Hall and the introduction of the city's first Political Action Committee, WAMC's Southern Adirondack Bureau Chief Lucas Willard takes a look at what's at stake.

 One way or another, one Congressional district in our region is getting a new representative.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Sean Patrick Maloney tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that he has worked well with retiring Republican Chris Gibson. 

WAMC/Pat Bradley

Village elections were held across New York Wednesday. Two challengers in some of the only contested mayoral races in the region claimed victory over their incumbent opponents.

1/26/15 Panel

Jan 26, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, WAMC Newsman Ray Graf and University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include: President Obama in India, Elections in Greece, Blizzard, Reactions to American Sniper, and Medical Treatments Tailored to Patient's DNA.

  November’s elections cost Democrats control of the Senate.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Representative Jim McGovern tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that Democrats need to inspire voters to turn out in midterm elections.

Wikimedia/Public Domain

The results of Tuesday’s national elections mean both the U.S. House and Senate will be controlled by Republicans when the new Congress is seated in January.  What does that mean for many of the Democratically-leaning districts in the Northeast? WAMC’s North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley gathered some thoughts from some of the region’s representatives.

Phil Roeder/Flickr

Voters who have taken part in today's midterms are expressing dissatisfaction and even anger with the Obama administration. But exit polling doesn't let Republican leaders off the hook either.The surveys of people leaving polling places showed the biggest concern is still the economy. Despite the drop in jobless rates and soaring stock prices, most voters say the economy is stagnating or getting worse.

Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain

Vermonters are going to the polls to choose their statewide elected officials. As WAMC’s North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley reports, time is running short before polls close in Vermont.

WAMC/Pat Bradley

The gubernatorial and Congressional races may be getting more attention, but many important down-ballot races will be decided November 4th as well. The Champlain Valley Business and Professional Women’s Club held a Meet the Candidates event Thursday night in Plattsburgh.  Candidates for the Assembly and Town Council discussed their platforms and answered questions.

9/17/14 Panel

Sep 17, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Political Consultant Libby Post & Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include:
Ground Troops?
GM Recall Outcry
Gov. Calls for Peterson Suspension
NFL Troubles - Redskins
Iowa Senate Race Importance

Congressman Sean Patrick Maloney
Courtesy of the Office of Congressman Sean Patrick Maloney

    Voters in the Hudson Valley are liable to throw incumbents out.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Sean Patrick Maloney tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that he’s confident he has a better record than his November opponent.

Pages