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education

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Time is running out to take part in New York state's public opinion survey on the Common Core learning standards.

Pat Bradley/WAMC

In the wake of fierce debate over the implementation of the Common Core education standards in New York, Governor Andrew Cuomo appointed a task force to undertake a comprehensive review and present recommendations. WAMC North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley was in Lake Placid last night for one of three simultaneous public listening sessions.

Pat Bradley/WAMC

The North Country Alliance for Public Education held its fourth “Open Forum on Open Education” Thursday evening. The panel included the region’s state representatives and one of its newest Regents. As WAMC North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley reports, the discussion focused on the impact of Common Core on the state’s education system.

Karen Magee: The Politics Of Receivership

Oct 29, 2015

In an impoverished section of Albany, the Philip Schuyler Achievement Academy is an oasis.

There, caring and dedicated Albany teachers provide a safe, nurturing learning environment for 300 or so students — 90 percent of whom are economically disadvantaged.

Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty
http://esty.house.gov/

 It’s been a busy week in Washington.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Representative Elizabeth Esty speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock about something more personal. 

A student at a Saratoga County high school has started a petition after he says school officials told him he could not go to prom in drag.

Karen Magee: Swinging Back Towards Sanity

Sep 25, 2015

I normally don’t put too much stock in opinion polls.

But, let me be honest with you: I smiled broadly when I heard about the recent Quinnipiac poll on education.

  When Mark Zuckerberg announced to a cheering Oprah audience his $100 million pledge to transform the downtrodden schools of Newark, New Jersey, then mayor Cory Booker and Governor Chris Christie were beside him, vowing to help make Newark “a symbol of educational excellence for the whole nation.” But their plans soon ran into the city’s seasoned education players, fierce protectors of their billion-dollar-a-year system. It’s a prize that, for generations, has enriched seemingly everyone, except Newark’s children.

Dale Russakoff explores all of the ins-and-outs in her book, The Prize: Who's In Charge Of America's Schools?

Blair Horner: The Debate Over Educating Prisoners

Sep 14, 2015

Recently the Obama Administration took a step to try to deal with one of the nation’s most intractable problems: how to reduce the recidivism rate of those released from prisons.  There are approximately 1.5 million people in state or federal prisons.  Those prisoners are serving time because they have been convicted of a serious crime.  But the question is – what happens when their time is up and they are released back into our communities?

NYSSBA Urges Truce In Education

Sep 9, 2015

  As the new school year began , the New York State School Boards Association urged a truce in education, asking all sides of the often emotional debate over common core and other issues to hold off on the arguments and focus instead on the students who were returning to class. The executive director of the State School Boards Association, Tim Kremer, says unfortunately the truce did not last very long.

  It’s a statistic that’s sure to surprise: close to 45 percent of postsecondary students in the United States today do not enroll in college directly out of high school and many attend part-time. Following a tradition of self-improvement as old as the Republic, the “nontraditional” college student is becoming the norm.

Back to School by Mike Rose is the first book to look at the schools that serve a growing population of “second-chancers,” exploring what higher education—in the fullest sense of the term—can offer our rapidly changing society and why it is so critical to support the institutions that make it possible for millions of Americans to better their lot in life.

  Among the first generation of boys prescribed medication for hyperactivity in the 1980s, Timothy Denevi took Ritalin at the age of six, and during the first week, it triggered a psychotic reaction. Doctors recommended behavior therapy, then antidepressants.

Nothing worked. As Timothy’s parents and doctors sought to treat his behavior, he was subjected to a liquid diet, a sleep-deprived EEG, and bizarre behavioral assessments before finding help in therapy combined with medication. In Hyper, Timothy describes how he makes his way through school.

  Dan-el Padilla Peralta is one of millions of young undocumented men and women brought to the country as children. He is also a gifted scholar who made his way to some of the world’s most elite schools.

Peralta’s new book is: Undocumented: A Dominican Boy’s Odyssey From A Homeless Shelter To The Ivy League evocatively recounts Peralta’s journey from the New York City shelter system to the Ivy League.


 Jackie Mercurio lives with her husband, five children, and black Lab in New York. She was recently named Winner of the Good Housekeeping Memoir Contest (2014). Her website iswww.jackiemercurio.com

Challenges Await For New State Ed Commissioner

Jul 14, 2015
Karen DeWitt

New York's new education commissioner has been on the job just over a week, and she’s been traveling the state on a listening tour to reach out to teachers, school boards and others who’ve been buffeted by an intense political climate during the most recent legislative session.  Commissioner Mary Ellen Elia attended a meeting of the Rural Schools Association in Cooperstown Monday.

betterloanchoice.com

Some state colleges and universities are adding graduate programs and changing their names to attract more students — and precious out-of-state tuition dollars.

  Richard H. Thaler has spent his career studying the radical notion that the central agents in the economy are humans―predictable, error-prone individuals.

His new book, Misbehaving, accounts the struggle to bring an academic discipline back down to earth and change the way we think about economics, ourselves, and our world.

Richard H. Thaler is a professor of behavioral science and economics at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and, in 2015, the president of the American Economic Association.

Two words — “sharp dissent” — are not normally used in the same sentence as “New York State Board of Regents.”

The schedule called for the New York State Legislature to be home for the summer by this week, but lawmakers are still in Albany as legislative leaders and Governor Andrew Cuomo try to reach agreement on a number of major issues, including making the 2 percent tax cap permanent, and changes to the charter school limit. While those are education issues, Tim Kremer, the Executive Director of the New York State School Boards Association, says everything has been tied to just one issue.

  A young lad who would rather draw than do math, spell, or gargle finds the perfect outlet for his always-on imagination in this manifesto to creative joie de vivre, featuring a book within a book, from the brilliant minds that brought you The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore.

Full of nostalgic references to a time when TV was black-and-white and Sunday newspapers had things called the funnies, this wildly fun story-within-a-story is based loosely on children’s book legend William Joyce’s third grade year, and includes a sewn-in mini-book of that tale of the world’s smartest booger.

  Since 1996, Capital Region Sponsor-A-Scholar has been helping students from low-income families acquire the academic skills they need to earn high school diplomas and enter college.

The agency, founded by civic leaders and social entrepreneurs in 1996, currently serves over 400 aspiring scholars from Albany, Schenectady and Troy High Schools.

Support includes weekly homework sessions, paid tutors, graphing calculators, fees for advanced placement courses, SAT preparation and testing, and for college visits and applications.

Here to tell us more is Capital Region Sponsor-A-Scholar Executive Director, Bill Corbett.

Regents Tap New Education Commissioner For New York

May 26, 2015

A Florida school superintendent has been appointed New York education commissioner.

The Board of Regents voted unanimously Tuesday to hire MaryEllen Elia at a salary of $250,000 a year.

Elia most recently led the Hillsborough County school district, which includes Tampa, Florida. She succeeds John King Jr., who stepped down at the end of 2014 for a post in President Barack Obama's administration.

Karen Magee: Why Do The Rich Need More Tax Credits?

May 21, 2015

Two recent events — one political, one cultural — offer a glimpse into two worlds.

Albany Teacher Seeks Scholarship Program For Refugees

May 20, 2015

Brian Huskie has never flinched from a challenge. He served in the National Guard in Iraq and then came home to teach at an urban high school, Albany High, where he teaches English to students including refugees from Burma, Iraq, Nepal and Africa whose English skills in some cases don't exist. Huskie is now working to fund a scholarship for the refugee students through the State University of New York.

Vermont lawmakers looking to overhaul the state's school governance system are going to have to resolve significant differences between the House and Senate if they hope to pass a bill this year.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

From Common Core testing to teacher evaluations, education is one of the most contentious issues in New York right now. About two dozen teachers, administrators, and union officials participated in a roundtable discussion this morning to offer their own ideas on the state’s education policies with their local Assemblymember and Regent Board member.

  Sir Ken Robinson is one of the world’s most influential educators. Listed by Fast Company as “one of the world’s elite thinkers on creativity and innovation,” he advises governments, corporations, and leading cultural institutions.

In his new book, Creative Schools: The Grassroots Revolution That’s Transforming Education, he shows parents, educators and administrators how they can transform the way our schools work. He says - by focusing first on the students and teachers (not test scores), schools can evolve into the organic, personal learning environments they deserve to be.

http://www.foodislife.org/

This campus is swarming with diligent students – dead-set on becoming the best in their field. But how does a person decide that they want to make food and food service their career?

Darcy Sala is the chef-instructor for Dutchess County BOCES Career and Technical Institute in Poughkeepsie, NY. She graduated from The CIA in 2001 and she joins us now along with Kimberly Calle – an 11th grader at John Jay High School in Hopewell Junction who is part of the culinary program at Dutchess BOCES to talk about how people find their passion for food prep and turn it into a career.

4/15/15 Panel

Apr 15, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Professor, Rosemary Armao, and political consultant, Libby Post.

Scheduled topics include Cuba off terrorism list; Congress allowed in on Iran; Atlanta educators sentenced; Retiree savings changes; EU Google anti-trust.

Roadtrip Nation helps young people take on the age-old question “What are you going to do with your life?” in a groundbreaking way. Nathan Geghard, from the interview based, inspirational TV series, has a new book which aims to help people think deeply about how they can thrive in the work place. Roadmap: The Get-It-Together Guide for Figuring Out What to Do with Your Life includes prompts for write-ins and engaging graphs which make the self-discovery process exciting, active, and personally impactful.

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