education | WAMC

education

The field beside Kingsborough Elementary in Gloversville has been fenced off due to contamination concerns
Lucas Willard / WAMC

The Gloversville Enlarged School District is taking action to address a contaminated playing field next to one of its elementary schools.

Rucker C. Johnson is the Chancellor's Professor in the Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley, and a faculty research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research

We are frequently told that school integration was a social experiment doomed from the start. But as Johnson demonstrates in "Children of the Dream," it was, in fact, a spectacular achievement.

Drawing on longitudinal studies going back to the 1960s, he shows that students who attended integrated and well-funded schools were more successful in life than those who did not and this held true for children of all races.

When I was in college, our professors encouraged us to find applied learning experiences. Whether it was getting an internship, doing research in a lab, studying abroad, or finding an apprenticeship, at that time it was simply an idea, and certainly far from a requirement. Regardless of the type of experience, these opportunities give students a chance to apply knowledge acquired in a classroom to real world situations.

This year’s Spectrum Conference – for Sexual & Interpersonal Violence Prevention Education, Capacity Building, and Training in Response for Underserved Sexual and Gender Minorities takes place July 9-10 in Albany, New York.

Among the sessions this year will be Nine on IX, nine higher ed attorneys discussing the past and future of Title IX; an update on the state of HIV/AIDS; a panel of LGBTQI+ Presidents discussing successes and remaining challenges; and the first ever national keynote by Charlie Craig and Dave Mullins, who tried to purchase a wedding cake from Masterpiece Cakeshop in Colorado, a case that went to the Supreme Court last year.

We welcome: SUNY Associate Counsel Joseph Storch, and SUNY Director of Sexual and Interpersonal Violence Prevention Elizabeth Brady.

Courtesy of Congressman Antonio Delgado's office

New York Congressman Antonio Delgado has wrapped up a district work period. He briefed reporters Monday about his latest focus on education and workforce development. The 19th District Democrat also voiced his disappointment over the state of rural broadband.

A voting machine
WAMC

A contentious race for school board in Saratoga Springs has come to an end. Though the tone of the campaign was sometimes negative, the winning candidates say they’re looking forward to working together on the school board.

When Lois Letchford learns her son has been diagnosed with a low IQ at the end of grade one, she refuses to give up on his future. After thorough testing, Nicholas proves to have no spatial awareness, limited concentration, and can only read ten words.

Nicholas is labeled "learning disabled," a designation considered more derogatory than "dyslexia," the world of education is quick to cast him aside. Determined to prove them all wrong, Lois temporarily removes her son from the school system and begins working with him one-on-one.

What happens next is a journey: spanning three continents, unique teaching experiments, never-ending battles with the school system, a mother’s discovery of her own learning blocks, and a bond fueled by the desire to rid Nicholas of the “disabled” label.

Lois Letchford's book is "Reversed: A Memoir."

Jal Mehta is Associate Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, where he has received the Morningstar Award, presented annually to the best teacher at the school. He is author of "The Allure of Order: High Hopes, Dashed Expectations, and the Troubled Quest to Remake American Schooling."

With Sarah Fine he has co-authored a new book entitled "In Search of Deeper Learning: The Quest to Remake the American High School."

The story they tell is alternately discouraging and hopeful. Drawing on hundreds of hours of observations and interviews at thirty different schools, Mehta and Fine reveal that deeper learning is more often the exception than the rule. And yet they find pockets of powerful learning at almost every school, often in electives and extracurriculars as well as in a few mold-breaking academic courses. These spaces achieve depth, the authors argue, because they emphasize purpose and choice, cultivate community, and draw on powerful traditions of apprenticeship. These outliers suggest that it is difficult but possible for schools and classrooms to achieve the integrations that support deep learning: rigor with joy, precision with play, mastery with identity and creativity.

Named one of the world’s ten most influential intellectuals by MIT, Douglas Rushkoff is an award-winning author, broadcaster, and documentarian who studies human autonomy in the digital age. The host of the popular "Team Human" podcast, Rushkoff has written twenty books. His latest is "Team Human," a manifesto on his most urgent thoughts on civilization and human nature.

In it, he argues that we are essentially social creatures, and that we achieve our greatest aspirations when we work together not as individuals. Yet today society is threatened by a vast antihuman infrastructure that undermines our ability to connect. Money, once a means of exchange, is now a means of exploitation; education, conceived as way to elevate the working class, has become another assembly line; and the internet has only further divided us into increasingly atomized and radicalized groups. If we are to resist and survive these destructive forces, we must recognize that being human is a team sport. In Rushkoff’s own words: “Being social may be the whole point.”

Jewish Voice for Peace -Hudson Valley has scheduled a panel entitled “We All Belong Here: Hearing the Voices of Muslim Women,” the event is a panel discussion with Muslim women to examine the intersectionality of diversity and “otherness” and how those inform our perceptions and governmental policies.

The discussion will be based on the personal experiences and narratives of Muslim women living in our region. This event will take place on Saturday, May 4th 1:30-4 pm at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation in Kingston.

Our guests are Cheryl Qamar - an Arab-American & social activist from Saugerties, New York who is the Chair of the Anti-Islamophobia Committee for Jewish Voice for Peace-Hudson Valley and Susan Smith, Director of operations at the Fellowship of Reconciliation, community liaison for the Muslim Peace Fellowship, and a member of the Community of Living Traditions at Stony Point Center, New York, an intentional residential community of Jews, Christians and Muslims.

Founded in 2001, the Vassar Haiti Project engages students in a life-changing, experiential education in global citizenship, promotes Haitian art, and fosters sustainable development in Haiti. In addition to the purchase and sale of original Haitian art, VHP’s contributions are guided by six initiatives: education, healthcare, reforestation, clean water access, women’s empowerment, and art.

The Vassar Haiti Project’s 7th annual Art and Soul gala fundraiser will be held on Thursday, April 25, at the Vassar College Alumnae House.

This year, the Vassar Haiti Project honors Robert M. Morgenthau and Lucinda Franks for their extraordinary achievements in the fields of international social justice and literature.

We welcome Vassar Haiti Project Co-founders Andrew and Lila Meade along with Lucinda Franks.

Madeleine Kunin is the former three-term governor of Vermont, who served as the deputy secretary of education and ambassador to Switzerland under President Bill Clinton.

In her new book, “Coming of Age: My Journey to the Eighties,” the topic is aging but she looks well beyond the physical tolls and explores the emotional ones as well.

Our “Falling into Place” series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place. “Falling Into Place” is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This week we are learning about the Boys & Girls Club of the Capital Area – the Albany and Troy Clubs have just merged. To tell us all about it we welcome: Boys & Girls Clubs of the Capital Area’s Chief Executive Officer Justin Reuter and Chief Operations Officer Patrick Doyle.

In late summer 1940, as war spread across Europe and as the nation pulled itself out of the Great Depression, an anti-communist hysteria convulsed New York City. Targeting the city’s municipal colleges and public schools, the New York state legislature’s Rapp-Coudert investigation dragged hundreds of suspects before public and private tribunals to root out a perceived communist conspiracy to hijack the city’s teachers unions, subvert public education, and indoctrinate the nation’s youth.

Drawing on the vast archive of Rapp-Coudert records, Union College History Professor Andrew Feffer looks to provide the first full history of this witch-hunt, which lasted from August 1940 to March 1942.

He does so in the new book: "Bad Faith: Teachers, Liberalism, and the Origins of McCarthyism." Andrew Feffer is Professor of History and Co-Director of the Interdisciplinary Program in Film Studies at Union College.

MaryEllen Elia: 2019 Budget Priorities

Jan 8, 2019

Happy New Year to all of you, I hope you all had a wonderful holiday season.

Today, as we look toward the upcoming legislative session, I’d like to talk about the Board of Regents 2019 Budget and Legislative Priorities and our State Aid request for the 2019-20 school year.

Born and raised in Jackson, Mississippi, Kiese Laymon, Ottilie Schillig Professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Mississippi, is the author of the novel "Long Division" and a collection of essays, "How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America."

In his new book, "Heavy: An American Memoir," he writes eloquently and honestly about growing up a hard-headed black son to a complicated and brilliant black mother in Jackson, Mississippi. From his early experiences of sexual violence, to his suspension from college, to his trek to New York as a young college professor, Laymon charts his complex relationship with his mother, grandmother, anorexia, obesity, sex, writing, and ultimately gambling.

By attempting to name secrets and lies he and his mother spent a lifetime avoiding, Laymon asks himself, his mother, his nation, and us to confront the terrifying possibility that few in this nation actually know how to responsibly love, and even fewer want to live under the weight of actually becoming free.

Joe Feldman has worked in education at the local and national levels for over 20 years in both charter and district school contexts, as a teacher, principal, and district administrator. He began his career as a high school English and American History teacher in Atlanta Public Schools and was the founding principal of a charter high school in Washington, DC. He has been the Director of Charter Schools for New York City Department of Education, the Director of K-12 Instruction in Union City, California, and was a Fellow to the Chief of Staff for U.S. Secretary of Education Richard Riley. Joe is currently CEO of Crescendo Education Group, a consulting organization that partners with school and districts to help teachers use improved and more equitable grading and assessment practices.

In his book, "Grading for Equity," Feldman takes a look at inconsistent grading practices and the ways they can inadvertently perpetuate the achievement and opportunity gaps among our students.

Tara Westover’s memoir, “Educated,” has made its way to the number one spot on the New York Times bestsellers list.

She tells her story of being a young girl who, kept out of school, leaves her survivalist family and goes on to earn a PhD from Cambridge University.

In his new book, "Math With Bad Drawings: Illuminating The Ideas That Shape Our Reality" Ben Orlin reveals to us what math actually is. It's myriad uses, it's strange symbols, and the wild leaps of logic and faith that define the usually impenetrable work of the mathematician. The book is a very funny reeducation in mathematics, full of joy, jokes, and stick figures that shed light on the countless practical and wonderful ways that math structures and shapes our world. There are 24 chapters in the book covering topics from the electoral college to human genetics to the reasons not to trust statistics. " Math With Bad Drawings" is a book for the math estranged and the math enamored alike.

Ben Orlin is the author of the blog, "Math With Bad Drawings" he also writes on a variety of topics related to math for: The Atlantic, Slate, The L.A. Times, and The Chicago Tribune. Joining us today is Ben Orlin.

Williams College President Emeritus Francis Oakley, author of the new book "From the Cast-Iron Shore," will present a free book talk and signing on Sunday afternoon from 2-4 PM at the Clark Art Institute auditorium.

"From the Cast-Iron Shore," part personal memoir and part participant-observer's educational history, details the progression of Williams from a fraternity-dominated institution in the 1950s to the leading liberal arts college it is today.

Oakley relays his experiences growing up in England, Ireland, and Canada, his time as a soldier in the British Army, and his years as a student at Yale University. He combines this account with reflections on social class, the relationship between teaching and research, the shape of American higher education, and the challenge of educational leadership in the late twentieth and early twenty-first century.

Seasoned opens to the public October 9th
SUNY Adirondack / SUNY Adirondack

SUNY Adirondack in Queensbury is opening a new student-run restaurant in nearby downtown Glens Falls. The eatery called “Seasoned” will open to the public on October 9th at the college’s new Culinary Arts Center on Hudson Avenue.

Families today are squeezed on every side from high childcare costs and harsh employment policies to workplaces without paid family leave or even dependable and regular working hours. Many realize that attaining the standard of living their parents managed has become impossible.

In her book, "Squeezed: Why Our Families Can't Afford America," Alissa Quart, executive editor of the Economic Hardship Reporting Project, examines the lives of many middle-class Americans who can now barely afford to raise children. She shows how our country has failed its families. Her subjects, from professors to lawyers to caregivers to nurses, have been wrung out by a system that doesn’t support them, and enriches only a tiny elite.

The struggle to desegregate America's schools was a grassroots movement, and young women were its vanguard. In the late 1940s, parents began to file desegregation lawsuits with their daughters, forcing Thurgood Marshall and other civil rights lawyers to take up the issue and bring it to the Supreme Court. After the Brown v. Board of Education ruling, girls far outnumbered boys in volunteering to desegregate formerly all-white schools.

In "A Girl Stands at the Door," historian Rachel Devlin tells the remarkable stories of these desegregation pioneers. She also explains why black girls were seen, and saw themselves, as responsible for the difficult work of reaching across the color line in public schools. 

Rachel Devlin is an associate professor of history at Rutgers University.

The Flying Deer Nature Center in New Lebanon, New York is a wilderness school and community dedicated to mentoring children, adults, and families in deep connection to nature, self, and others.

Their educators guide people of all ages in nature immersion and education. Michelle Apland is the Executive Director of Flying Deer Nature Center.

Each July and August the Williams College Museum of Art (WCMA) produces a public program series that offers a playful taste of the academic experience. This summer the series titled "Ologies" is digging into some of the quirkiest fields of study.

Also on WCMA’s summer agenda is the exhibition “Dance We Must: Treasures from Jacob’s Pillow, 1906-1940” which explores the contributions of Jacob's Pillow founder Ted Shawn and the iconic Ruth St. Denis to American modern dance.

Gathering over 350 materials, the exhibition contextualizes the pioneering work of Shawn and St. Denis within the scope of American art history through artifacts that have never been seen before.

Sally Taylor, daughter of James Taylor and Carly Simon, curates "Come to Your Senses" in MASS MoCA’s Kidspace gallery and art-making studio, which will include new music by both of her parents. A program of Taylor’s long-running "Consenses" project, "Come to Your Senses" asks visual artists, poets, dancers, musicians, perfumers, chefs, and sculptors to use one another’s art as a catalyst to create their own work.

At Kidspace, the initial works of art, through which all other works were inspired, were created by 5th grade students in North Adams and Northern Berkshire schools. Come to Your Senses is the capstone of Kidspace’s “Art 4 Change” project. An opening reception will be held on Saturday, June 23, at from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Kidspace.

To celebrate the opening of "Come to Your Senses," Sally Taylor will present an intimate one-night-only concert in The Hunter Center at MASS MoCA at 7 p.m.

The Berkshire Theatre Group’s Education Department brings performing arts into the lives of 13,000 schoolchildren in The Berkshires through touring productions, residency programs, internships and assistantships, after-school programming, camps, children’s theatre productions, seasonal employment opportunities, and more.

Many of our schools lack the funds to provide students with arts education. Berkshire Theatre Group’s Education Department strives – all year long – to fill that gap. Their programs offer children the chance to perform, of course, but also to learn, to build confidence, and to collaborate.

We are joined by Travis Daly, BTG’s Artistic Associate of Education (and director of this summer’s production of "Tarzan"); Allison Rachele Bayles, BTG's Administrative Director of Education; and Hanna Koczela who has been involved with BTG Community Productions and Education Programs for the past 10 years and has just graduated from High School.

The Sexual & Interpersonal Violence Prevention Education, Capacity Building, and Training in Response for Underserved Sexual and Gender Minorities is a comprehensive, research-based training happening next week in Albany.

The conference will provide cutting-edge, prevention and response training to enhance the knowledge and skills of attendees through training to faculty, staff, medical professionals, and community and state agency service providers to turn the dial on sexual and interpersonal violence against sexual and gender minorities, while providing the most trauma-informed, and culturally-competent response and care when incidents do occur.

The conference will run in Albany, New York from June 18-22 and will include prevention and response education specifically tailored to addressing the disproportionate impact of sexual and interpersonal violence against sexual minorities on college campuses domestically, and abroad.

Joseph Storch is the Associate Counsel for The State University of New York and Elizabeth Brady is their Violence Prevention Project Director.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of  -- and fosters collaboration between -- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place. Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This morning we focus on the Radix Ecological Sustainability Center - a non-profit urban environmental education center located in the South End of Albany. On a one-acre city farm, they teach ecological literacy to area residents with demonstrations of sustainable tools and technologies including gardens, bioshelters, aquaponics, rainwater collection, composting, chickens, honeybees, and wind turbines. We are joined by co-founders Educational Director Scott Kellogg and Executive Director Stacy Pettigrew.

All too quickly, talkative, affectionate young boys seem to slip away. Adolescents may be transformed overnight into reclusive, seemingly impenetrable young people who open up only to their friends and spend more time on devices than with family. How do you penetrate this shell before they are lost to you?

Drawing on decades of experience garnered through thousands of hours of therapy with boys, clinical psychologist Adam Cox’s new book, "Cracking the Boy Code," explains how the key to communicating with boys is understanding their universal psychological needs and using specific, straightforward communication techniques.

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