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Andrew Pallotta: Education - An Avenue To Equality

Jun 29, 2020

Our hearts were broken this spring by the killing of George Floyd, a black man, at the hands of a white Minneapolis police officer. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, racial and economic inequalities within our nation were already laid bare. And with his death, the need for change took on new urgency. We at NYSUT were heartened that New York State lawmakers responded quickly to widespread calls for change by instituting criminal justice reforms in June.

School bus
Pat Bradley/WAMC

The New York State Board of Regents and State Education Department are holding meetings across the state to gather input on how to reopen and meet the needs of students in the fall.

Students Macy, Cameron, and Thomas speak during Wednesday's Facebook Live update
Saratoga County Office of Emergency Services/Facebook

At a time when they’d normally just now be heading home for the summer, Saratoga County schoolchildren shared their experiences of learning from home and imparted a little advice about how to get through the pandemic.

ballot box
Wikimedia Commons

The deadline for submitting school budget ballots by mail in New York has been extended.

wikipedia.org

Schools may be able to hold smaller, outdoor graduation ceremonies later this month.

Pawan Dhingra is Professor of American Studies at Amherst College. He is the author of many books, including "Life Behind the Lobby: Indian American Motel Owners and the American Dream." His work has been featured in the Boston Globe, the Washington Post, The New York Times, Salon, the PBS News Hour, and the documentary, "Breaking the Bee."

In "Hyper Education," he uncovers the growing world of high-achievement education and the after-school learning centers, spelling bees, and math competitions that it has spawned.

        The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are:

WAMC's Alan Chartock

Judith Enck - Senior Fellow and Visiting Professor at Bennington College, Founder of Beyond Plastics, former EPA regional administrator.

Jeff Goodell - is a long-time contributing editor at Rolling Stone, where he has been writing about climate change for more than a decade. His most recent book is The Water Will Come: Rising Seas, Sinking Cities, and the Remaking of the Civilized World. Earlier this month he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship.

Elizabeth Kolbert - has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1999 and won a Pulitzer Prize for her book, "The Sixth Extinction."

New York state Capitol
Jim Levulis / WAMC

The New York State School Boards Association says schools are bracing for teacher layoffs over the next year, as schools, which have been closed for weeks, face uncertain funding in the new school year.

Russell Brown
Photo provided

Straining broadband internet and parents alike, students are now taking classes from home as schools remain closed due to the coronavirus. It’s not clear students will return at all this school year. Teachers have also had to adapt, bringing their instruction online. 

BTG PLAYS! 2019-2020 Touring Show is "Magic Tree House: Pirates Past Noon," based on the book "Magic Tree House: Pirates Past Noon" by Mary Pope Osborne. This musical features a book by Jenny Laird and Will Osborne, lyrics by Randy Courts and Will Osborne and music by Randy Courts, with direction by Travis Daly.

Magic Tree House: Pirates Past Noon is an adaptation of the fourth of Mary Pope Osborne's award-winning fantasy adventure books from the Magic Tree House book series, which has sold more than 100 million copies and is available in more than a hundred countries around the world.

BTG PLAYS! Touring Show is a part of Berkshire Theatre Group’s year-round education program, which reaches 13,000 school children annually. Beginning in October and running through the school year, this production is appropriate for elementary and middle school aged children and family audiences, and is designed to introduce students to the excitement of live theatre.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities… see more promise… see more progress.

This morning we focus on Albany fund for Education. We welcome Kathryn Bamberger, Executive Board Member of the Albany Fund for Education - which enhances opportunities for students to learn, grow, and succeed by building community partnerships, raising funds, and investing in innovative and effective programs and projects that build equity and strengthen the educational infrastructure of the City School District of Albany. 

The Hart Cluett Museum’s ‘The Way We Work(ed)’ exhibit, will open to the public tomorrow at 5:00 p.m.The exhibit was organized by The Hart Cluett Museum in collaboration with the Smithsonian as part of a pilot project to develop a unique humanities-based exhibition about local work history. The museum is one of just 10 museums in the United States chosen through a competitive selection process.

The exhibit is divided into four sections: “Where We Work,” “How We Work,” “Who Works?” and “Why We Work.” An advisory panel consisting of more than two dozen area professionals from widely different facets of the region’s workplaces was assembled to provide a contemporary perspective on the ever-changing nature of work. The panel included experts from backgrounds in technology, construction, agriculture, education and workforce development, among others.

Stacy Pomeroy Draper, the Curator of the Hart Cluett Museum joins us this morning.

Union College Receives Historic $51 Million Gift

Feb 22, 2020
Mary and Rich Templeton
Jackie Orchard / WAMC

Union College has received the largest single donation in its 225-year history.

William Doyle is a New York Times bestselling author and TV producer for networks including HBO, The History Channel, and PBS. Since 2015 he has served as Fulbright Scholar, Scholar in Residence and Lecturer on Media and Education at University of Eastern Finland, a Rockefeller Foundation Resident Fellow, and advisor to the Ministry of Education and Culture of Finland.

With Pasi Sahlberg, Professor of Education Policy at Gonski Institute for Education, University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, Doyle has written the book "Let the Children Play: How More Play Will Save Our Schools and Help Children Thrive."

Monique W. Morris, co-founder of the National Black Women’s Justice Institute, is the author of several books, including "Pushout," and "Black Stats." Her work has been featured by NPR, the New York Times, MSNBC, Essence, The Atlantic, the Washington Post, Education Week, and others.

Wise Black women have known for centuries that the blues have been a platform for truth-telling, an underground musical railroad to survival, and an essential form of resistance, healing, and learning.

In her highly anticipated book "Sing a Rhythm, Dance a Blues: Education for the Liberation of Black and Brown Girls," leading advocate Monique W. Morris invokes the spirit of the blues to articulate a radically healing and empowering pedagogy for Black and Brown girls. The book reimagines what education might look like if schools placed the thriving of Black and Brown girls at their center.

Paul Tough is the author of "Helping Children Succeed" and "How Children Succeed." He is also the author of "Whatever It Takes: Geoffrey Canada’s Quest to Change Harlem and America." He is a contributing writer to the New York Times Magazine and a regular contributor to the public-radio program "This American Life."

Tough's new book "The Years That Matter Most" tells the stories of students trying to find their way, with hope, joy, and frustration, through the application process and into college.

Drawing on new research, the book reveals how the landscape of higher education has shifted in recent decades and exposes the hidden truths of how the system works and whom it works for.

Andrew Pallotta: Fully Fund NYS Schools

Dec 27, 2019

Students don’t get a do-over when it comes to their education. They only have one chance to prepare for future success -- whether that means entering college or the work force.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

Today, we’ll learn about The Free School in Albany, New York.

Founded in 1969, The Free School is the longest running inner-city independent alternative school in the United States. The school provides an alternative to traditional models of education by offering children a self-directed approach to their learning. We are joined by Director of The Albany Free School Deirdre Kelly and educator, EPIC program director and Free School Radio Executive Producer Gerald Malcolm.

One of the most important things unions do for their members is fight to protect and preserve their professions.  As educators that also means fighting to protect the people we serve — the students we help to inspire, motivate and nurture every day.

Ulrich Baer was educated at Harvard and Yale and has been awarded John Simon Guggenheim, DAAD, Paul Getty, and Alexander von Humboldt Fellowships. He is University Professor at New York University. His podcast, "Think About It," is devoted to in-depth conversations on powerful ideas, including freedom of speech, and language that changes the world.

His new book is "What Snowflakes Get Right: Free Speech, Truth, and Equality on Campus." It is published by Oxford University Press.

Another school year is under way. We’re off to a great start.

For students and parents, routines have been set or renewed. New locker combinations have been figured out. The tears at the bus stop have died down.  And new schedules are beginning to feel routine.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise … see more progress.

This morning we’ll learn about the Children’s Museum of Science and Technology in the Rensselaer Technology Park from Executive Director Catherine Gilbert and Director of Education and Discovery Sarah Smith.

In "Work, Love, and Learning in Utopia: Equality Reimagined," psychological anthropologist Martin Schoenhals argues that the negative emotions of sadness, anger, and fear evolved in tandem with hierarchy, while happiness evolved separately and in connection to prosociality and compassion.

The book covers a range of human concerns, from economics and education, to media and communication, to gender and sexuality. Schoenhals argues that equality of love is as important and possible as is economic equality.

    Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities…see more promise…see more progress.

This morning we focus of Literacy Volunteers of Rensselaer County and speak with Executive Director Judy Smith and Project Coordinator Linda Feldmann.

The field beside Kingsborough Elementary in Gloversville has been fenced off due to contamination concerns
Lucas Willard / WAMC

The Gloversville Enlarged School District is taking action to address a contaminated playing field next to one of its elementary schools.

Rucker C. Johnson is the Chancellor's Professor in the Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley, and a faculty research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research

We are frequently told that school integration was a social experiment doomed from the start. But as Johnson demonstrates in "Children of the Dream," it was, in fact, a spectacular achievement.

Drawing on longitudinal studies going back to the 1960s, he shows that students who attended integrated and well-funded schools were more successful in life than those who did not and this held true for children of all races.

When I was in college, our professors encouraged us to find applied learning experiences. Whether it was getting an internship, doing research in a lab, studying abroad, or finding an apprenticeship, at that time it was simply an idea, and certainly far from a requirement. Regardless of the type of experience, these opportunities give students a chance to apply knowledge acquired in a classroom to real world situations.

This year’s Spectrum Conference – for Sexual & Interpersonal Violence Prevention Education, Capacity Building, and Training in Response for Underserved Sexual and Gender Minorities takes place July 9-10 in Albany, New York.

Among the sessions this year will be Nine on IX, nine higher ed attorneys discussing the past and future of Title IX; an update on the state of HIV/AIDS; a panel of LGBTQI+ Presidents discussing successes and remaining challenges; and the first ever national keynote by Charlie Craig and Dave Mullins, who tried to purchase a wedding cake from Masterpiece Cakeshop in Colorado, a case that went to the Supreme Court last year.

We welcome: SUNY Associate Counsel Joseph Storch, and SUNY Director of Sexual and Interpersonal Violence Prevention Elizabeth Brady.

Courtesy of Congressman Antonio Delgado's office

New York Congressman Antonio Delgado has wrapped up a district work period. He briefed reporters Monday about his latest focus on education and workforce development. The 19th District Democrat also voiced his disappointment over the state of rural broadband.

A voting machine
WAMC

A contentious race for school board in Saratoga Springs has come to an end. Though the tone of the campaign was sometimes negative, the winning candidates say they’re looking forward to working together on the school board.

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