Documentary Film | WAMC

Documentary Film

Poster for "Conscience Point" doc
consciencepointfilm.com

On April 22 at 7pm, Vassar College will host a panel discussion reflecting on the documentary “Conscience Point,” which chronicles decades-long resistance by the Shinnecock Nation to overdevelopment and extractive practices by their elite Hamptons neighbors.

Panel members will include Vassar alumna, Alli Joseph, longtime Shinnecock activists and Shinnecock Tribal attorneys. Professor Molly McGlennen and American Studies major Julia Noonan will facilitate the conversation. This “Earth Day” event highlights Vassar’s year-long reckoning with Native American land acknowledgment practices and relationship-building with Indigenous nations in the region. 

This morning we talk with Producer Alli Joseph, Vassar Student Julia Noonan, and Program Director of American Studies & Native Studies Professor Molly McGlennen.

More info at Vassar Events and Upstate Films.

The new movie "Jimmy Carter: Rock & Roll President" showcases the role music played in propelling Jimmy Carter from Georgia to the White House, and how his love for music gave him an unexpected edge in the presidential race.

Willie Nelson, Bono, Bob Dylan, Garth Brooks, Trisha Yearwood, Jimmy Buffett, Roseanne Cash, Paul Simon, Andrew Young, and Madeleine Albright are just a few of the contributors giving interviews in the documentary. Rare, archival footage from live performances by Buffett, Nelson, etc. are also included in the documentary.

There will be three screenings this upcoming Labor Day weekend presented by the Berkshire International Film Festival and Shakespeare & Company on Thursday and Saturday at the Berkshire Drive-In at Shakespeare & Company campus and on Sunday at the Mahaiwe Drive-In at Simon's Rock.

Director Mary Wharton and Producer Chris Farrell and join us.

Leading the Oscar nominations is “Joker” with 11. The supervillain origin story is closely followed by three movies: “1917,” “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” and “The Irishman,” with 10 nominations each, while “Parasite,” “Marriage Story,” and “Little Women” all picked up six nods.

The question now is: who will take home gold come February 9? So, to discuss who we think could win at this year's Oscars – we welcome Thelma Adams.

Thelma is the author of the bestselling novels: "Bittersweet Brooklyn," "The Last Woman Standing" and "Playdate." Additionally, she is a prominent film critic – having been the in-house film critic for Us Weekly and the New York Post. Her greatest title is that she is an Oscarologist.

As a writer on "Late Night with David Letterman," Steve Young’s duties included scouring through record bins in search of potential subjects for the show’s “Dave’s Record Collection” segments. Little did he know, his hunt for offbeat vinyl would thrust him into the world of Broadway-style “industrial musicals” put on by such companies as General Electric, McDonald’s, Ford, and Xerox at their annual sales meetings in the ’50s through the ‘80s.

These productions dazzled and motivated their only intended audience, each company’s sales-force, which was regaled with lavish productions such as "Lipton on the Move," "Lucite, You and ’72," and "The Bathrooms Are Coming."

The documentary, "Bathtubs Over Broadway," follows Young’s odyssey as he tracks down these shows’ souvenir albums, finds kindred fanatics, interviews the performers, songwriters and directors, and discovers rare performance footage of songs such as “My Bathroom” and “Everything’s Coming Up Citgo.” Bathtubs over Broadway is now streaming on Netflix. The film is directed by Dava Wisenant.

The 2019 John Moore Documentary Studies Collaborative Documentary Forum, “Humor: Laughing with Reality,” happening at Skidmore College is a weekend-long festival with presentations of artistic work and symposium-style conversations around the theme of humor in documentary.

The first of two keynote events happens tonight. It is: Sam Green and Yo La Tengo “The Love Song of R. Buckminster Fuller” tonight at 8 PM at the Zankel Music Center in Saratoga Springs.

In this hour-long “live documentary,” Academy Award–nominated filmmaker Sam Green explores Fuller’s utopian vision of radical social change through a design revolution. The project is a collaboration between Green and the legendary indie band Yo La Tengo. At tonight’s screening, Green narrates the film in person and cues images while Yo La Tengo performs their original score.

Ira Kaplan for Yo La Tengo joins us.

In 2017, MASS MoCA became the largest museum for contemporary art in the world, but just three decades before, its vast brick buildings were the abandoned remains of a shuttered factory.

Jennifer Trainer's new documentary film, “Museum Town” tells that story.

“Museum Town” shows how a small rural Massachusetts town went from economic collapse to art mecca. “Museum Town” will be the closing night film for this year’s Berkshire International Film Festival, screening at 7 p.m. on June 2 at The Mahaiwe in Great Barrington, Massachusetts.

An early and longtime director of development and public relations for MASS MoCA, Jennifer Trainer is now the President & CEO and Hancock Shaker Village. “Museum Town” is her first movie.

Upstate Films in Rhinebeck, New York will hold a screening of "Heading Home: The Tale of Team Israel" followed by a discussion with documentarian Seth Kramer on Sunday, March 24 at 2:30 p.m.

"Heading Home" is the upbeat and crowd-pleasing story of Team Israel as they compete as underdogs for their first time in the World Baseball Classic. Seth Kramer’s films include: "The Linguists, Evocateur: The Morton Downey Jr. Movie," and "The Anthropologist." Local to the mid-Hudson Valley, Seth lives in Red Hook and works at Ironbound Films with collaborators Daniel Miller and Jeremy Newberger.

She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry” explores the history of the women who founded the modern women’s movement from 1966 to 1971. The documentary takes its audience from the founding of the National Organization for Women to the emergence of more radical factions of women’s liberation - telling a proud and reflective story about feminist accomplishments and missteps.

The film combines dramatizations, performance, and archival footage, along with interviews with women who fought for their own equality, and in the process created a world-wide revolution.

The New York State Writers Institute will present a screening of “She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry” tonight at 7:30 at Page Hall on UAlbany’s Downtown Campus. A q&a with director and award-winning documentary producer Mary Dore will follow the screening and she joins us.

The new documentary film, "Netizens," exposes the proliferation of cyber harassment faced by women, spreading from the web to the most intimate corners of their lives. As the internet becomes the next frontier of civil rights, this feature documentary follows three women who are targets of harassment, along with advocates, legal experts and others, as they confront digital abuse and strive for equality and justice online.

"Netizens" will screen twice as part of the Woodstock Film Festival. Cynthia Lowen is an award-winning filmmaker and writer and she joins us.

The 2018 Woodstock Film Festival will showcase 9 World Premieres, 4 North American Premieres, 1 US Premiere, 12 East Coast Premieres and 8 New York Premieres on October 10-14th

The iconic Woodstock Film Festival was created in the year 2000. Since then, it has become one of the foremost regional independent film festivals. Establishing itself as a ground-breaking festival that offers a unique platform for filmmakers around the globe, the Woodstock Film Festival has been named among the top 50 film festivals worldwide.

WFF's Co-Founder and Executive Director Meira Blaustein joins us for a preview.

In her documentary film “Hot to Trot,” Hudson Valley based filmmaker, Gail Freedman, brings her audience into the world of same-sex ballroom dancing -- and into the lives of several dancers.

“Hot to Trot” will screen at Upstate Films in Rhinebeck, New York on October 6 and at the Rosendale Theatre in Rosendale, New York on October 21. Gail Freedman will be in attendance for both screenings.

In more than 20 years as an award-winning filmmaker, Freedman has produced, directed and written dozens of documentaries on a wide range of subjects, through her company, Parrot Productions. She has also taught at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Among her films is Making the 9/11 Memorial, a primetime special for The History Channel, which aired on the 10th anniversary of September 11th, when the Memorial opened. Her creative output encompasses independent projects, as well as extensive work for PBS, network television, cable, syndication and the Internet, along with educational and non-profit films.

TMI Project

Jul 23, 2018

Since 2010, the Hudson Valley based TMI Project has used a time-tested storytelling methodology, transformational workshops and stellar performances in an effort to change the world one story at a time – and they have a lot going on.

The weekend of August 17, the workshop “True Storytelling with TMI Project” will be at Omega Women's Leadership Center in Rhinebeck, NY.

The Trevor Project, the leading national organization providing crisis intervention and suicide prevention services for LGBTQ youth, has teamed up with TMI Project to celebrate its 20th anniversary.

Eva Tenuto and Sari Botton join us to tell us more about the Omega workshop, TMI’s documentary film “Vicarious Resilience,” and their partnership with The Trevor Project.

The 13th Annual Berkshire International Film Festival will showcase 80 of the latest independent feature, documentary, short and family films from 28 countries from May 31 to June 3 in Great Barrington, Massachusetts and from June 1 to 3 in Pittsfield, Massachusetts.

The festival features screenings and various special events including three “Tea Talks”. One of this year’s Tea Talks features Berkshire based Academy Award winning filmmaker, Cynthia Wade, and a screening of her new documentary, “Grit.”

"Grit" is co-directed and co-produced by Wade and Sasha Friedlander and follows the lives of Indonesian citizens in East Jakarta displaced from their villages when an underground mudflow, struck by a natural gas drill, bubbles up and buries their homes and everything they own beneath 60 feet of mud.

Cynthia Wade joins us.

From Academy Award-winning filmmaker Morgan Neville ("20 Feet from Stardom"), "Won’t You Be My Neighbor?" takes an intimate look at America’s favorite neighbor: Mister Fred Rogers.

A portrait of a man whom we all think we know, this emotional and moving film takes us beyond the zip-up cardigans and the land of make-believe, and into the heart of a creative genius who inspired generations of children with compassion and limitless imagination.

The highly anticipated and already much lauded film will be the closing night presentation of this year's Berkshire International Film Festival. BIFF takes place May 31-June 3. Nicholas Ma is a producer on "Won't You Be My Neighbor?" and he joined us to talk about the movie and his relationship with Fred Rogers.

Boxes of film reels from the Dawson City Recovery site—an entire lost archive in need of preservation, 1978.
Kathy Jones-Gates / Dawson City Archives


  “Dawson City: Frozen Time” is the latest film from award winning documentary filmmaker, Bill Morrison, whose previous films include “Decasia,” "The Miners' Hymns" and "The Great Flood."

 

The film will be presented by Pothole Pictures in Shelburne Falls on May 4th and 5th and at The Opalka Gallery at Sage College in Albany, NY on May 11. Morrison will attend the Pot Hole Pictures screening on May 4th and will be at The Opalka Gallery screening on May 11.

 

"Dawson City: Frozen Time" pieces together the strange true story of a collection of some 500 films dating, from 1910s to the 1920s, which were lost for over 50 years until being discovered in 1978 buried in a subarctic swimming pool deep in the Yukon Territory

Morrison used these permafrost protected, rare silent films and newsreels, archival footage, interviews and historical photographs to tell the story of Dawson City’s gold rush boom-and-bust and the remote location’s unlikely ties to several aspects of early film history.  

Using a trove of footage unearthed from the National Geographic archives, the new documentary film "Jane" tells the true story of Jane Goodall as a young woman whose chimpanzee research challenged the male-dominated scientific consensus of her time and revolutionized our understanding of the natural world.

Filmmaker Brett Morgen joins us. Dubbed the “mad scientist” of documentary film by the New York Times, Brett Morgen has been directing, writing, and producing ground breaking documentary films for the past 15 years.

After five years of war in Syria, the remaining citizens of Aleppo are getting ready for a siege. Through the eyes of volunteer rescue workers called the White Helmets, "Last Men in Aleppo" allows viewers to experience the daily life, death, and struggle in the streets, where they are fighting for sanity in a city where war has become the norm.

The film is nominated for a 2018 Academy Award for Best Documentary and is currently available to view on Netflix. It will also air on PBS on March 1. Director, Feras Fayyed, joins us.

In the documentary film, The Rape of Recy Taylor, Nancy Buirski reconstructs events from 1944, when Recy Taylor, a twenty-four-year-old black woman in Abbeville, Alabama, was abducted on her way home from church by six white men who then raped her. Though Taylor identified her attackers, a local grand jury did not indict anyone for the crime. The NAACP mobilized a national campaign on Taylor’s behalf, sending Rosa Parks, its leading rape investigator to Abbeville. She and others recognized that, if justice could be served, it would be the result of reporting outside the immediate area. They nationalized the case yet the perpetrators remained uncharged, and the case slipped into oblivion.

The film will screen in Woodstock on Saturday at 10 a.m. as part of the Woodstock Film Festival and Nancy Buirski will be there for a Q&A following.

Griffin Dunne
Chronogram Magazine

Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold is a biographical documentary featuring the life of influential American writer, Joan Didion. Directed by Joan's nephew, Griffin Dunne, the film enlightens the viewer with an unprecedented, intimate perspective on Joan's life and career accomplishments.

The film features interviews from Joan herself, as well as close family and friends, interwoven with contextual archival footage/stills to visualize Joan's astute writing. Joan, famous for bringing order to disorder through her words, exposes, examines and divulges the most pivotal events in American history, making her one of the most recognizable and influential voices within the literary world. The story of this film not only considers Joan Didion the writer, but gives light to Joan Didion, the individual. 

The film will be screened at Upstate Films in Rhinebeck, NY on October 13th at 5:45pm as part of the Woodstock Film Festival with a Q & A to follow with Griffin Dunne. 

Celebrating 18-years of innovative filmmakers & filmmaking, the Woodstock Film Festival has unveiled its line-up of nearly 120 films, panels, and events, screening Wednesday, October 11th through Sunday, October 15th, in Woodstock NY, and neighboring towns of Rhinebeck, Saugerties, Kingston and Rosendale.

The festival which is featuring 4 World Premieres, 5 North American Premieres, 1 US Premiere, 20 East Coast Premieres and 9 New York Premieres.

WFF's Co-Founder and Executive Director Meira Blaustein joins us for a preview. 


  The new documentary STEP shares the story of three young women in the first graduating class at Baltimore Leadership School for Young Women and their experiences with school, their families, boyfriends, friends, and their Step team.

 

Pushed to succeed by devoted teachers, teammates, counselors, coaches and themselves, they chase their dreams: to win a step championship and to be accepted into college.

 

STEP which won the U.S. Documentary Special Jury Award for Inspirational Filmmaking at Sundance this year, will have its Massachusetts premiere as the opening night film at the Berkshire International Film Festival -- screening tonight at 6pm at The Mahaiwe in Great Barrington.

 

The film is directed by Amanda Lipitz who joins us.

In Anne Makepeace’s new documentary, two Native American judges reach back to traditional concepts of justice in order to reduce incarceration rates, foster greater safety for their communities, and create a more positive future for their youth. By addressing the root causes of crime, they are providing models of restorative justice that are working. Mainstream courts across the country are taking notice.

The film will screen at The Moviehouse in Millerton, NY on Sunday, March 26 at 11 a.m. The screening is presented by FilmWorks Forum.

Anne Makepeace has been a writer, producer, and director of award-winning independent films for more three decades. Tribal Justice, will premiere at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival in February 2017, and will culminate in a national PBS broadcast later this year.

April 15, 2013, Boston, Massachusetts--The winner of the marathon crossed the finish line hours ago, but Boylston Street remains vibrant as friends and families cheer a steady stream of runners coming down the final stretch. Suddenly the unthinkable happens...BOOM! BOOM! Two massive blasts instantaneously transform triumph to tragedy, killing four and leaving a blood-soaked trail of shrapnel and severed limbs in their wake.

Directors Ricki Stern and Annie Sundberg focus not on the politics or sensationalism, but instead offer a patchwork of deeply moving portraits of the victims, struggling to move forward on prosthetic limbs and recreate their lives.

Marathon: The Patriots Day Bombing will screen twice as part of the the Woodstock Film Festival

  The 4th Annual Beacon Independent Film Festival gets underway later this week - September 16th - 18th where they will screen features, shorts, documentaries and more.

Panel discussions, food vendors, green space, interactive activities for kids and adults make it an event for the whole family.

Terry Nelson is the Executive Director of the festival and we welcome him to The Roundtable this morning.

  The film Everybody Knows…Elizabeth Murray is an intimate portrait of the groundbreaking artist Elizabeth Murray. The film explores the relationship between Murray’s family life and career, and reconsiders her place in contemporary art history.

The film will be shown as part of the Reel Women in Film Series at The Linda in Albany on Saturday night at 8PM.

The film is directed and produced by Kristi Zea who will be speaking after the film is shown Saturday. Zea has been in the contemporary film scene for three decades. She has been acclaimed for her work as a production designer, costume designer and producer of major feature films and we welcome her to The Roundtable.

  The Woodstock Film Festival and Upstate Films in Rhinebeck will presents a screening of Newtown on August 24th at 8:15 p.m.

Filmed over the course of nearly three years, the filmmakers use unique access and never before heard testimonies to tell a story of the aftermath of the deadliest mass shooting of schoolchildren in American history on December 14, 2012. Newtown documents a traumatized community fractured by grief and driven toward a sense of purpose.

Kim A. Snyder’s most recent film, NEWTOWN premiered in competition at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival, and was hailed in Entertainment Weekly as among the “Best of Sundance.” NEWTOWN will continue to screen at premiere festivals worldwide and is poised to have a theatrical release in September 2016, with a national broadcast on PBS’s Independent Lens in early 2017.

Maria Cuomo Cole is the award-winning producer of the feature documentary, Newtown, which will be premiering at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival. In her career, she has tackled such relevant subjects as gun violence, homelessness, veterans’ PTSD, Domestic Violence and sexual assault.

They will be at the screening in Rhinebeck and join us to talk about the film.

  The new film Dear President Obama, The Clean Energy Revolution Is Now will be seen Thursday night at 7PM at The Linda: WAMC’s Performing Arts Studio in Albany.

Narrated by actor and activist Mark Ruffalo, the film is a direct appeal to President Obama as he shapes his environmental legacy, but it is also a very loud shout-out to every elected official in the country to carefully consider the growing evidence that proves that leaving fossil fuels in the ground is the only reasonable energy path forward.

The film is written and directed by Jon Bowermaster.

  The documentary feature film, Life, Animated, will be The Berkshire International Film Festival’s opening night film in Pittsfield, MA at The Beacon Theatre on Friday, June 3rd at 7pm.

Life, Animated tells the story of how Owen Suskind, who is autistic, found a pathway through Disney animation to language and a framework for making sense of the world. This emotional coming-of-age story follows Owen as he graduates to adulthood and takes his first steps toward independence. Owen’s father, Ron Suskind, wrote a book of the same name to tell his family’s story of losing Owen.

The film interweaves classic Disney sequences with verite scenes from Owen’s life, the film explores how identification and empathy with characters like Simba, Jafar, and Ariel forge a conduit for him to understand his feelings and interpret reality.

Life, Animated won the Directing Award for a U.S. Documentary at this year’s Sundance Film Festival and director, Roger Ross Williams, join us now. Roger Ross Williams is an Academy Award winning documentarian -- winning in 2010 for the Documentary Short Subject, Music by Prudence.

  The 11th Annual Berkshire International Film Festival will take place from June 2nd through the 5th in Great Barrington and June 3rd though the 5th in Pittsfield, MA.

The festival will bring films, filmmakers, industry professionals and film fans together for a celebration of independent film featuring documentaries, narrative features and short films – along with special tributes, parties, and discussions.

Kelley Vickery, Founder and Executive Director of BIFF and she joins us with a preview.

  Nationwide statistics have proven in-prison educational and rehabilitation programs to be extremely successful, yet many states across the country have cut large portions of the funding for these programs.

The film, The Game Changer, the winner of multiple festival awards, follows New Paltz’s renowned choreographer Susan Slotnick in her work rehabilitating prisoners through dance at the Woodbourne Correctional Facility.

The film will screen at Unison Arts Center in New Paltz, NY this Saturday, May 14th at 8pm in a special event that will also feature dance performances and discussion.

Susan Slotnick joins us.

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