depression | WAMC

depression

Sarah LaDuke: May is Mental Health Awareness Month - and it seems like the topic of mental health and mental health treatment is surging to the forefront of many conversations as we face ... I don't think I really need to restate what we, as a planet, are facing.

What follows is an honest discussion about depression and suicide.

My younger sister, Jen, has been living with severe depression for years, possibly for her entire life. She's had some counseling, tried medication, and leaned hard on primarily our mother. Before I continue, I did ask her if I could talk about her in the context of this interview on the radio - and she said, "Sure, I struggle with this every day. Tell some people."

Steven C. Hayes, Ph.D., is a professor of psychology at the University of Nevada, Reno. The author of forty-three books and more than six hundred scientific articles, he has served as president of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy and the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science, and is one of the most cited psychologists in the world.

Dr. Hayes initiated the development of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and of Relational Frame Theory (RFT), the approach to cognition on which ACT is based.

His new book is "A Liberated Mind: How to Pivot Toward What Matters."

Hank Greenberg: Lawyers And Depression

Oct 2, 2019

One of America’s greatest lawyers, judges and public servants was Charles Evans Hughes.

Farming has been in John Connell's family for generations, but he never intended to follow in his father's footsteps. Until, one winter, after more than a decade away, he finds himself back on the farm.

Connell records the hypnotic rhythm of the farming day—cleaning the barns, caring for the herd, tending to sickly lambs, helping the cows give birth. Alongside the routine events, there are the unforeseen moments when things go wrong: when a calf fails to thrive, when a sheep goes missing, when illness breaks out, when an argument between father and son erupts and things are said that cannot be unsaid.

"The Farmer’s Son" is the story of a calving season, and the story of a man who emerges from depression to find hope in the place he least expected to find it.

BJ Leiderman
Mark Edward Atkinson

We’re about to talk to a person whose work is heard multiple times a day on WAMC — but rarely his voice. Until now. BJ Leiderman, the composer behind several public radio theme songs including those for Morning Edition, Marketplace, Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me, is out with his first album, called BJ. The album is both funny and serious, cheeky and earnest. And it even features Bela Fleck on banjo.

Are you tired? Do you suffer from chronic pain—headaches, backaches, or other chronic discomfort? Do you get depressed or anxious? Do you have allergies, rashes, or autoimmune issues? Have you lost your zest for life somewhere along the way?

If you have one or more of these symptoms, you may be suffering from a condition that Dr. Rachel Carlton Abrams calls Chronic Body Depletion.  The condition can be related to weight gain, high blood pressure, exhaustion, and many other symptoms that leave the body drained. 

In her new book: Bodywise: Discovering Your Body’s Intelligence for Lifelong Health and Healing she shows us not only how to recognize and treat the symptoms that plague them, but also offers strategies for optimum health and lifelong healing. 

Matt Haig is a British author for children and adults. His memoir Reasons to Stay Alive was a number one bestseller, staying in the British top ten for 46 weeks. His children's book A Boy Called Christmas was a runaway hit in his own country and is translated in over 25 languages.

We also speak with him about Reasons to Stay Alive - his memoir about how he came through crisis, triumphed over an illness that almost destroyed him and learned to live again. 

  Like nearly one in five people, Matt Haig suffers from depression. His book: Reasons to Stay Alive is Matt’s inspiring account of how, minute by minute and day by day, he overcame the disease with the help of reading, writing, and the love of his parents and his girlfriend (and now-wife.) And eventually, he learned to appreciate life all the more for it.

Speaking as his present self to his former self in the depths of depression, Matt is adamant that the oldest cliché is the truest—there is light at the end of the tunnel. The book looks to teach us to celebrate the small joys and moments of peace that life brings, and reminds us that there are always reasons to stay alive.

    

  In her latest novel, After Birth, Elisa Albert writes about motherhood and friendship. The book tells the story of Ari who lives in a town in upstate New York and is supposed to be working on a Ph.D. in women’s studies but she has major postpartum depression.

The book issues a wake-up call to a culture that turns its new mothers into exiles and expects them to act like natives.

  Forty years ago, when a young Ginny Gilder stood on the edge of Boston’s Charles River and first saw a rowing shell in motion, it was love at first sight. Yearning to escape her family history, which included her mother’s emotional unraveling and her father’s singular focus on investment acumen as the ultimate trophy, Gilder discovered rowing at a pivotal moment in her life.

Having grown up in an era when girls were only beginning to abandon the sidelines as observers and cheerleaders to become competitors and national champions, Gilder harbored no dreams of athletic stardom. Once at Yale, however, her operating assumptions changed nearly overnight when, as a freshman in 1975, she found her way to the university’s rowing tanks in the gymnasium’s cavernous basement.

Course Correction: A Story of Rowing and Resilience in the Wake of Title IX recounts the physical and psychological barriers Gilder overcame as she transformed into an elite athlete who reached the highest echelon of her sport and recounts lessons learned from her journey.

In 2006, Jamie Tworkowski wrote a story called “To Write Love on Her Arms” about helping a friend through her struggle with drug addiction, depression, and self-injury. The piece was so hauntingly beautiful that it quickly went viral, giving birth to a non-profit organization of the same name.

Nine years later, "To Write Love on Her Arms" is a leader in suicide prevention and serves as a source of hope, encouragement, and resources for people worldwide. Now, Jamie’s writing is available in book form.

The new book is: If You Feel Too Much: Thoughts on Things Found and Lost and Hoped For which is a celebration of hope, wonder, and what it means to be human. Jamie Tworkowski is the founder of To Write Love on Her Arms, a nonprofit movement dedicated to presenting hope and finding help for people struggling with depression, addiction, self-injury, and thoughts of suicide.

4/1/15 Panel

Apr 1, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Professor, Rosemary Armao, and WAMC newsman, Ray Graf.

Scheduled topics include: Bills on ‘Religious Freedom’ in Arkansas and Indiana; Lufthansa knew of Andreas Lubitz's ‘severe depression;' Nuclear talks with Iran; New Ethics Disclosure Rules for New York Legislators; Trevor Noah Backlash.

3/27/15 Panel

Mar 27, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Kingston Freeman Publisher Emeritus and SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Scheduled topics include: Harry Reid won't seek re-election; Germanwings co-pilot update; police brutality in Detroit; Egypt to Yemen; NYC Building Collapse; Downton Abbey to end.

Can leading a sedentary lifestyle contribute to depression?

Dr. Nancy Low, assistant professor in the department of psychiatry at McGill University, is studying the correlation between these two afflictions.

Nancy Low is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at McGill University, Clinician-Researcher at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), and Staff Physician in the Mood Disorders Program of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC).

How does depression affect one's personal goals?

Joanne Dickson, research director on the Doctorate of Clinical Psychology Programme in the Institute of Psychology, Health and Society at the University of Liverpool, surveyed the personal goals of people with depression and people who have never suffered from the mood disorder to study the results.

    Nearly every depressed person is assured by doctors, well-meaning friends and family, the media, and ubiquitous advertisements that the underlying problem is a chemical imbalance. Such a simple defect should be fixable, yet despite all of the resources that have been devoted to finding a pharmacological solution, depression remains stubbornly widespread. Why are we losing this fight?

    

  Rob Delaney: Mother. Wife. Sister. Human. Warrior. Falcon. Yardstick. Turban. Cabbage. is the title of the stand-up comedian’s tell-all-or-most memoir. In it, he vividly shares stories of his childhood, depression, alcoholism (he’s now more than 11 years sober), and that time he put an egg in a microwave.

Rob Delaney is one of the rare people whose time spent on Twitter has helped his career. Before he was making money as a comedian, he was sending out 140 character or less jokes like “Imagine a shark. Terrified yet? Well you will be when I tell you that THE SHARK IS MADE OF GLUTEN!” and “The hour I lose from daylight savings time will now be multiplied by 6 as I try to change the time on the clock in my car.” and many others not exactly suitable for radio.

His twitter-persona is primarily brash, irreverent, and fearless. His memoir is funny - but also stuffed with thoughtful reflections on too-real experiences. And then - as you can count on from any good comedian - funny again.

Listener Essay - Recovery Letter

Nov 5, 2013

  Beth Manion is a mental health advocate, writer and public speaker whose work focuses on increasing awareness of issues surrounding mental illness.  She is a member of Board of Directors of The National Alliance on Mental Illness of Western Massachusetts.   

  The National Institute of Mental Health estimates that more than 13 percent of U.S. adults have received treatment for some kind of mental health problem.

Still, the most severe cases remain the hardest to treat and take the biggest toll not just on the family and friends of those afflicted but also on the country at large. The National Institute of Mental Health puts the economic cost of untreated mental illness in the U.S. at more than $100 billion per year.

    Melody Moezzi was born to Persian parents at the height of the Islamic Revolution and raised in the American heartland. When at eighteen, she began battling a severe physical illness, her community stepped up, filling her hospital rooms with roses, lilies, and hyacinths.

But when she attempted suicide and was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, there were no flowers. Despite several stays in psychiatric hospitals, bombarded with tranquilizers, mood-stabilizers, and antipsychotics, she was encouraged to keep her illness a secret—by both her family and an increasingly callous and indifferent medical establishment.

Refusing to be ashamed, Moezzi became an outspoken advocate, determined to fight the stigma surrounding mental illness and reclaim her life along the way. She tells her story in Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life.