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Onondaga Lake Cleanup Resumes

Apr 4, 2014

The cleanup of Onondaga Lake in central New York is set to resume.

(Flickr) Governor Andrew Cuomo

Citizens living along the Hudson River in downtown Albany are in a heightened state of awareness and worry over those so-called "oil trains" that routinely roll through their backyards.

On Friday, federal and state authorities participated in a series of inspections at the Port of Albany and its adjacent rail yard, as well as inspections in Albany and Buffalo along rail tracks and in rail cars. Inspectors found oil tank cars with wheel defects and brake shoe defects.

Three Albany Common Council Members continue their efforts to ensure local residents have their say as plans move forward to build a crude oil heating facility at the Port of Albany.

Capital District Against Fracking

The future of hydraulic fracturing has been in limbo since the New York state Department of Environmental Conservation began a review of the practice in 2008. Now, six public hearings are being held across New York to receive public comment on the draft State Energy Plan... one of them in Albany today.  Environmental groups are also at the Capitol today calling on Governor Andrew Cuomo to put renewable energy ahead of fossil fuels in his effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 80 percent by 2050.

WAMC Composite Photo by Dave Lucas

Albany residents alarmed about a plan to build a crude oil heating facility at the port of Albany have rallied their forces after meeting to discuss neighborhood safety issues -  they are meeting again --- tonight --- Wednesday, February 12, 2014, 6:00 p.m. at Giffen Elementary School-274 South Pearl Street.  

Protect the Adirondacks

In November, New York voters approved a constitutional amendment that allows a mining company in the Adirondacks to expand its wollastonite mine onto 200 acres of forest preserve land in exchange for 1,500 acres of forest land. Groups that oppose the idea are asking the Department of Environmental Conservation to confirm that the agency will enforce all other relevant laws.

WAMC Photo by Dave Lucas

Sewage pollution in the Hudson River at Albany will be reduced under a $136 million plan announced Thursday by New York State environmental regulators, the city of Albany and five other surrounding communities. 

A cleaner future for the Hudson River in 15 years? Officials say it's do-able. Under an agreement with the Department of Environmental Conservation, a coalition of six communities will upgrade sewer systems to reduce discharges of storm water-diluted sewage after heavy rain.

WAMC Photo by Dave Lucas

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s new computerized sporting licensing system is operational.  Commissioner Joe Martens says the new system will allow sportsmen and sportswomen to conduct license transactions   

The transition of hunter, angler and trapper data required a temporary shutdown for sales of hunting, fishing and trapping licenses, recreational marine fishing registrations and harvest game reporting.  The data transfer has been completed and individuals can resume normal transactions and reporting on the new system.

Patrick Stahl, flickr

A long-awaited agreement between the New York State Department of Environmental and New York City Department of Environmental Protection has been signed.

  On one day, Thursday Oct 10th, 3 thousand students, educators, and volunteers will visit 65 sites along the Hudson from New York Harbor to the mouth of the Mohawk.

It is being called “A Day In the Life of Hudson River.” 

  Hudson River Estuary Coordinator, Fran Dunwell and Hudson River Science Educator, Chris Bowser from the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation Estuary Program are here to tell us this morning about how this helps people get a feel for the diversity and dynamic nature of the Hudson River system.

CM Mooney, flickr

An environmental group says budget cuts at the state’s environmental agency has meant up to 75% fewer inspections of polluters  like power plants and hazardous waste sites.

Revised 'Fracking' Regulations Released in NY

Nov 30, 2012
AP Photo

 New York environmental officials have released a revised set of proposed regulations for hydraulic fracturing natural gas and will begin taking public comment on them in December.

  The Department of Environmental Conservation says the voluminous technical document was initially posted Wednesday, a day before a deadline for adopting rules for the controversial drilling known as "fracking" or making changes and allowing more comment. It's been a year since the last public hearings on the original proposal.

WAMC Photo by Dave Lucas

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has come under increased scrutiny as questions have arisen over the agency's ability to oversee Hyrdraulic Fracturing, should the process of extracting natural gas from shale be legalized in the state. In the eyes of environmental activisits, the leadership of the DEC is strong and solid... Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Dave Lucas reports.

21 state, county and municipal leaders have signed a letter calling on New York State to fine New York City 13-point-5 million dollars for sending turbid waters into the Lower Esopus Creek... Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Dave Lucas reports.

The 21 leaders sent a letter to the State Department of Environmental Conservation, which must decide whether to allow the releases of muddy water to go on...  those opposed to the releases argue they damage ecosystems in the Lower Esopus and hinder business and recreational opportunities for communities situated along the Creek.

Listener Essay - Field Day

May 4, 2012

Barbara Allen Loucks is a wildlife biologist with the DEC, and a writer and essayist living in Guilderland, NY.

Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Joe Martens says there's no timeline for a decision on whether fracking of shale gas wells will be allowed in New York state, but the review will likely continue through the summer. More from WAMC's Dave Lucas...

Speaking Thursday at the annual Spring Environment Conference held by the Business Council in Albany, Martens says the agency doesn't have a specific date yet for an update on the environmental review and proposed regulations for high-volume hydraulic fracturing of shale gas wells.

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