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Richard Friedberg Macondo, 2014 aluminum, 132 x 132 x 198 in.
provided / mwpai.org

Monumental sculptures representing natural disasters caused by human activity create a forceful presence in the Munson Williams Proctor Arts Institute exhibit "Terrible Beauty," a showcase for Richard Friedberg’s impressive body of work created during the past decade.

Friedberg has been compelled by such horrific events as the BP Deepwater Horizon wellhead blowout at Macondo Prospect in the Gulf of Mexico and the Fukushima nuclear accident and tsunami.

These specific events, in Friedberg’s hands and imagination, are transformed into works reminiscent of terrible explosions, tidal waves, and smoke. The sculptures, made with aluminum mesh screening, a material that proves appropriately malleable for his subject.

To tell us about the exhibit on display through May 30th, we welcome Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art - Mary Murray.

Analia Saban b. Buenos Aires, 1980; lives and works in Los Angeles  Teaching a Cow How to Draw 2020 Cedarwood Courtesy of the artist and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York / Los Angeles
Sarah LaDuke / WAMC

The Clark Art Museum is currently presenting its first outdoor exhibition on the museum’s extensive and bucolic grounds in Williamstown, Massachusetts. “Ground/work” features site-responsive sculptural creations by six different contemporary artists placed around The Clark’s 140 acre campus.

Organized by the Clark, under the leadership of guest curators Molly Epstein and Abigail Ross Goodman, Ground/work is free and open to the public and will be on view into October of 2021.

Ferrin Contemporary is presenting "Nature/Nurture," a group exhibition of twelve contemporary female artists invited to explore the influence of gender and its impact on their practice. The show was organized in honor of Women's History Month in conjunction with FOREFRONT2020, a symposium on women in the visual arts taking place on the MASS MoCA campus.

The exhibition explores these ideas that range from direct interpretations of the natural world to more abstract notions, such as the construction of gender and the endowed role of women within their personal and professional careers. Works in clay range in form from individual vessels to composed still lifes and figural and abstract sculpture.

Considering the impact that the #MeToo movement is having on all professions, artists were asked to pause and reflect on the role gender plays in their artistic practice and to consider the nurturing experiences that have shaped them. To tell us more, we welcome Senior Curator of Visual Arts at MASS MoCA Susan Cross, an artist featured in Ferrin Contemporary's "Nature/Nurture" group exhibition Anina Major, and director of Ferrin Contemporary and curator of Nature/Nurture Leslie Ferrin.

Sabrina Gschwandtner, American (born 1977) Elizabeth Keckley Diamond, 2014 16mm polyester film, polyester thread, and lithographic ink in a light box, 15 7/8 × 16 13/16 × 3 1/16in. Museum Purchase, 2017.19
https://www.mwpai.org/

The new exhibition “Celebrating Suffrage” at the Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute in Utica, New York marks the 100-year anniversary of Congress’s ratification of women’s suffrage, the right for American women to vote in all government elections.

Women found unique creative outlets before and after they were officially recognized as full citizens of the United States. This exhibition explores the role of art as a vehicle for women, as individuals or in groups, to reflect, reform, or challenge social beliefs and political practices of their era.

“Celebrating Suffrage” examines how women created their place within the larger art community, adding an important vision that has often been overlooked or undervalued. This anniversary presents the opportunity to celebrate the contributions to subject matter, materials, and means of expression that women have made to the visual arts in the United States.

Miranda Hofelt is Curator of 19th-Century American Art at MWPAI.


  The ornamental motif known as arabesque has ancient sources and first appeared in Islamic cultures as a form of sacred writing. It figures in key movements in European art, bridging cultures and materials, arabesque did not settle into a single form or style.

 

The nineteenth-century flowering of this motif is featured in the Clark Art Institute exhibition “Arabesque,” on view at the Williamstown, Massachusetts museum through March 22.

 

Anne Leonard, the Manton Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs, and curator of the exhibition, takes us on an audio tour and discusses several of the featured works.

The exhibition “Ida O’Keeffe: Escaping Georgia’s Shadow” brings together thirty-five paintings, prints, and photographs exploring the artist’s mastery of color and composition as well as her complex relationship with her well-known sister, Georgia. The show will be on view at the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts through October 14.

Organized by the Dallas Museum of Art and curated by Sue Canterbury, The Pauline Gill Sullivan Associate Curator of American Art, the exhibition debuted in Dallas in 2018 and is the first ever solo museum exhibition of works by Ida Ten Eyck O’Keeffe and the most comprehensive survey of the artist’s work to date.

Robert Wiesenberger is the Associate Curator of Contemporary Projects at The Clark and he led us through the exhibition.

The Concert, 1918–19. Oil on canvas, 29 3/4 x 36 1/2 in. Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto. Gift of Reuben Wells Leonard Estate, 1954, 53/27
Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Over the course of his long career, French painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir continually turned to the human figure for artistic inspiration. Renoir was born in 1841 and died a century ago in 1919. To observe the centenary of his death, the Clark Art Institute and the Kimbell Art Museum present the new exhibition, “Renoir: The Body, The Senses.” Include paintings, drawings, pastels, and sculptures by Renoir as well as works by his predecessors, contemporaries, and followers, the exhibition is on display at The Clark in Williamstown, Massachusetts through September 22.

“Renoir: The Body, The Senses” features works from The Clark’s collection and loans from all around the world. It was co-organized by Esther Bell, the Robert and Martha Berman Lipp Chief Curator at the Clark, and George T. M. Shackelford, Deputy Director at the Kimbell.

Esther Bell lead us through the exhibition.

The Thomas Cole National Historic Site in Catskill, New York has opened a new exhibition that, for the first time, explorers Cole's paintings of Catskill Creek.

"Thomas Cole’s Refrain: The Paintings of Catskill Creek" will run through November 3rd. Created during the 18-year period between 1827 and 1845, the artist's paintings of Catskill Creek constitute the most sustained sequence of landscape paintings he ever made. The views in the paintings were all anchored along one short stretch of Catskill Creek near the Village of Catskill.

To tell us more we welcome the Thomas Cole Site's curator, Kate Menconeri, and the exhibition's curator, H. Daniel Peck.

For more than four decades, enormous advertisements displayed in New York City’s Grand Central Terminal affirmed a picturesque notion of everyday American life. The 18-foot-by-60-foot images depicted an idyllic nation: beautiful landscapes, holiday celebrations, world-changing historical events, family road trips, and patriotism.

"Colorama" is now on display at the Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, NY, examines the advertisements, offering insight into America, and the histories of advertising, photography, and technology. Thirty-six reproduced images from the George Eastman Museum depict an idealized past for a new generation, and a reintroduction for those who lived through the decades that helped shape photography. To tell us more: we welcome Director of Curatorial Affairs and Programming Jonathan Canning and Curator of Museum Education & Programming Jenny Hutchinson.

The Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College is now presenting the critically acclaimed exhibition “Like Sugar,” which explores the problematic and joyful aspects of sugar from multiple points of view to broaden our understanding of how the multi-layered substance affects us.

Tonight (Monday, March 4), in conjunction with the exhibition, the Tang’s Accelerator Series of talks on urgent issues is presenting “Food Futures—Food Justice, Sustainability, and Well-Being” with special guests Kate Daughdrill, an artist and urban farmer from Detroit; Anthony Hatch, a Wesleyan University professor whose book “Blood Sugar” critiques how scientists and drug companies use race and ethnicity; and Leah Penniman, a farmer, activist and author from Grafton, New York.

In the studio with us today to tell us all about the exhibition and tonight’s event are Ian Berry, the Dayton Director of the Tang Teaching Museum, and Rachel Seligman, the Malloy Curator and a co-organizer of the “Like Sugar” exhibition.

The Norman Rockwell Museum presents "The Art and Wit of Rube Goldberg," an exhibition exploring the humorous illustrations of the visionary artist, who has become famous for the creative inventions bearing his name. The exhibit opens tomorrow and runs through June 9th.

The exhibition will offer a revealing look at Goldberg’s creativity through original comic strips from the 1930s, where the artist created his complicated machines, as well as later political cartoons and instructional materials from the Famous Artists School, which are now part of the permanent collection of Norman Rockwell Museum.

Norman Rockwell Museum Curator of Exhibitions Jesse Kowalski, organized the exhibition and joins us this morning as does Steve Gerberich, a mechanical sculptor inspired by Goldberg, who will talk about his process at tomorrow’s opening, followed by a “make and take” art workshop, where he will lead participants in the creation of their own Rube Goldberg Machines.

Artist Jeffrey Gibson uses his art to reflect on his Choctaw and Cherokee heritage as a means of exploring the significance, traditions, and rituals of personal adornment and identity.

Gibson’s multidisciplinary practice encompasses a wide range of mediums and draws on a variety of influences and visual languages to comment on race, sexuality, religion, and gender, among other topical issues. He combines popular and queer culture with references to Native American history and current events.

His new exhibition, “This Is the Day” is on view at the Ruth and Elmer Wellin Museum of Art at Hamilton College in Clinton, New York through December 9.

Tracy Adler is The Johnson-Pote Director of The Wellin Museum and curator of this exhibition.

Frederic Edwin Church, a central figure in a group of artists known as the Hudson River School, became internationally renowned as a painter of monumental landscapes. The spectacular panoramas he painted in the 1840s through 1890s helped shape not only the cultural identity of the United States, but also of himself when he applied his vision as an artist to the house and 250-acre landscape that he named Olana, known today as Olana State Historic Site, a National Historic Landmark.

Olana’s designed landscape has been sensitively restored over the last ten years and can now be experienced by visitors very much as Church and his family experienced it in the 19th century. The new book: "Frederic Church’s Olana on the Hudson: Art Landscape Architecture," includes nearly fifty paintings and sketches by Church, alongside gorgeous photography by Larry Lederman and engaging essays by David Schuyler, Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, Stephen Hannock, and Thomas Woltz and Eleanor Jones Harvey who join us.

The great achievements of North America’s first artists are celebrated in the Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute exhibition “American Indian Art from Fenimore Art Museum: The Thaw Collection.”

The exhibition, on view through December 30, demonstrates the long-standing excellence of the aesthetic traditions of North America’s native peoples. Spanning the continent from the first millennium to the 20th century, the exhibition of more than 35 exceptional objects showcases masterpieces in various media: sculpture, painting, drawing, basketry, textiles, ceramics, and the decorative arts.

Mary Murray is the Department Head for Curatorial and Exhibitions and Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art.

Maxfield Parrish (American, 1870-1966) The Lantern Bearers, 1908; N. C. Wyeth (American, 1882-1945) In the Crystal Depths, 1906; Norman Rockwell (American, 1894-1976) Girl at Mirror, c. 1954
www.nrm.org

This summer, the Norman Rockwell Museum is presenting the first comprehensive exhibition to look at the work of master illustrators Maxfield Parrish, N.C. Wyeth, and Norman Rockwell in relation to the history of Western art.

With more than 60 works by 25 American and European painters, along with more than 300 digital representations of some 50 other artists, "Keepers of the Flame: Parrish, Wyeth, Rockwell, and the Narrative Tradition" reveals the lineage connecting American illustration to some 500 years of European painting through the long line of teachers who have passed along their wisdom, knowledge, and techniques to generations of creators.

Organized by the Norman Rockwell Museum, the exhibition is on view through October 28. It is curated by Dennis Nolan, an award-winning artist and professor of illustration at Hartford Art School at the University of Hartford who joins us along with Norman Rockwell Museum Chief Curator Stephanie Plunkett.

Each July and August the Williams College Museum of Art (WCMA) produces a public program series that offers a playful taste of the academic experience. This summer the series titled "Ologies" is digging into some of the quirkiest fields of study.

Also on WCMA’s summer agenda is the exhibition “Dance We Must: Treasures from Jacob’s Pillow, 1906-1940” which explores the contributions of Jacob's Pillow founder Ted Shawn and the iconic Ruth St. Denis to American modern dance.

Gathering over 350 materials, the exhibition contextualizes the pioneering work of Shawn and St. Denis within the scope of American art history through artifacts that have never been seen before.

Echo/Archive At EMPAC

Mar 1, 2018
George MacLeod
George MacLeod / echo-archive.com

A big premiere is happening Friday night at EMPAC.

Choreographer Elena Demyanenko and filmmaker Erika Mijlin’s collaboration Echo/Archive, which has been developed in residence over this past year, is a live dance and film project which features female performers across three generations and focuses on “bodily heritage,” or the way that movements are stored and communicated between bodies. Both artists teach at Bennington College. 

Filmmaker (and the lead video artist on Echo/Archive) Erika Mijlin and EMPAC’s Curator of Theater and Dance Ashley Ferro-Murray join us.

This morning we learn about the new exhibit at the Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, NY. "Alphonse Mucha: Master of Art Nouveau" is on display through March 18th.

"Alphonse Mucha: Master of Art Nouveau" examines how Mucha exploited the advertising poster to create a new movement in art. His work helped shape the aesthetics of French art at the turn of the twentieth century and formed the cornerstone of the international Art Nouveau movement.

Jonathan Canning, Director of Curatorial Affairs and Programming, joins us.

Stone barn at Hancock Shaker Village
Sarah LaDuke

Hancock Shaker Village is a living history museum - marrying past and present, proving with every addition to its programming that it is becoming a vibrant, new center for ideas, music, art, food, outdoor activities, and adventure.

The Village, which was settled in 1783, became a museum in 1960, just one year after the last Shakers left. Contained within its 20 historic buildings and 750 acres that sprawl across three towns is the only round Shaker barn in the world that was built in 1826. 

Jennifer Trainer Thompson, who spent the last 28 years helping to co-found and develop MASS MoCA in the Berkshires, took over as president of Hancock Shaker Village in January 2017. Jennifer joins us along with the village’s curator Lesley Herzberg and farmer Billy Mangiardi. 

Leon Polk Smith (American, 1906-96) untitled, 1968 paper on red Japanese paper, 35 ¾ x 25 in. Leon Polk Smith Foundation, 1968 D.053
mwpai.org

In the first-ever museum exhibition of drawings and collages by a pioneer of geometric abstraction, The Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute Museum of Art is presenting "Geometry in Motion: Leon Polk Smith Works on Paper," on view through the end of the year.

This exhibition examines Smith’s (1906-96) characteristic pieces from the 1940s, as he entered his artistic maturity, through the 1990s, when he was ever-prolific and undiminished by time.

Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art Mary Murray joins us.

Glimmerglass Film Days

Nov 6, 2017

Citizen Jane: Battle for the City, a film about Jane Jacobs’ grassroots efforts to protect her neighborhood—New York City’s Greenwich Village—from car-centric, post-war development, kicks off the fifth annual Glimmerglass Film Days on Thursday at the Otesaga Hotel in Cooperstown.

Glimmerglass Films Days continues through November 13th with 18 feature length films, 9 shorts, filmmaker talks, receptions, guided walks, a companion art exhibit, and restaurant specials. The films, made in the United States as well as Mexico, the Netherlands, Mongolia, France, New Zealand, China, Turkey, and Italy, all reflect the theme “Home.”

Film Days curator Peggy Parsons, who also directs the Film Program at the National Gallery of Art, joins us for a preview.


  The exhibition, An Inner World: Seventeenth-Century Dutch Genre Painting at The Clark in Williamstown, MA features seven genre paintings by Dutch artists working in or near the city of Leiden in the seventeenth century. Genre paintings, or scenes that take everyday life as their subject matter, flourished in the Dutch Republic in this period.

 

Based around The Clark’s own Girl at a Window by Gerrit Dou, the exhibition is scheduled to be on display through October 1st. We went to the museum recently and spoke with Alexis Goodin, Co-Curator and Curatorial Research Assistant at The Clark.

Each July and August the Williams College Museum of Art (WCMA) produces Summer School, a series of public programs that teases out new ways of thinking about learning, art, community, and museums. This summer, the series offers a playful taste of college culture taking inspiration from unconventional archives and the quirkiest kinds of libraries. It’s a weekly mashup of mini courses, extracurriculars on WCMA’s patio, a lending library, and pop-up programming in the museum’s Reading Room. 

Each week, Williams faculty and local experts lead hour-long mini courses in the galleries. These talks explore the museum’s collection, exhibitions, and spaces through the lens of libraries and archives.

To tell us more – we welcome Nina Pelaez - Assistant Curator of Public Programs at Williams College Museum of Art. 

JOE WARDWELL - HELLO AMERICA: 40 HITS FROM THE 50 STATES at MASS MoCA
Sarah LaDuke

  This Sunday, May 28th, MASS MoCA in North Adams, MA will open Building 6 - the Robert W. Wilson Building, to the public. This beyond-grand-opening doubles the vast museum’s exhibition space and features long-term exhibitions and collaborations with global leaders in contemporary art.

In this audio tour, MASS MoCA Curator Denise Markonish tells us about work by Barbara Ernst Prey, Louise Bourgeois, Metabolic Studio/Optics Division, Robert Rauschenberg, Dawn DeDeaux, Lonnie Holley, Laurie Anderson, Gunnar Schonbeck, Mary Lum, Janice Kerbel, and James Turrell; Allie Foradas describes work by Jenny Holzer, and James Wardwell tells us about "Hello America: 40 Hits from the 50 States." 

MASS MoCA's daylong celebration to mark the opening of Building 6 - the Robert W. Wilson Building - including welcoming remarks from museum director Joseph Thompson; a Nick Cave Soundsuit performance, Brooklyn United Marching Band and CAKE in concert on Joe’s Field.

 Japanese Impressions: Color Woodblock Prints from the Rodbell Family Collection is the first exhibition at the Clark to focus on the Institute’s permanent collection of Japanese prints. The exhibition spans more than a century of Japanese color woodblock printing as represented by three generations of artists who produced prints from the 1830s to the 1970s.

We went to The Clark in Williamstown recently to check out the exhibition with Jay A. Clarke, the Manton Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs at the museum.

Chesterwood in Stockbridge, MA is a site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation and was the summer home, studio and gardens of America’s foremost sculptor of public monuments, Daniel Chester French.

Its 38th annual outdoor sculpture exhibition, The Nature of Glass: Contemporary Sculpture at Chesterwood 2016, featuring 24 works by 12 internationally recognized glass artists. The exhibition, curated by Jim Schantz of Schantz Galleries Contemporary Glass, will be on view daily until September 18.

We are joined by Donna Hassler, the Executive Director of Chesterwood, Jim Schantz from Schantz Galleries Contemporary Glass, and artist Tom Patti.  

    The Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art at the State University of New York, New Paltz currently presents Anonymous, an exhibition of contemporary Tibetan art featuring over 50 works of painting, sculpture, installation, and video art by 27 artists living in Tibet and in diaspora. The show will be open through December 15th.

The exhibition was curated by Rachel Perera Weingeist, Senior Advisor to the Shelley & Donald Rubin Foundation, the exhibition is largely drawn from the Rubins’ private collection. Rachel joins us now to tell us more.

Next week, The Samuel Dorsky Museum presents Tibetan Arts Week, a series of public programs and discussions with leading artists and scholars.

Karen Pearson/Mass MoCA

    One of the MASS MoCA's current exhibitions is Jason Middlebrook: My Landscape. The pieces contained include new works from Jason’s series of painted hardwood planks begun in 2008 and will debut an awe-inspiring, hanging mobile that functions like a fountain within the gallery.

Richard Walker / Richard Walker

Anna D'Ambrosio, Director and Chief Curator of the Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute Museum of Art joins us to tell us about their Shadow of the Sphinx exhibition which is on display through November 25th at the Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute in Utica.