crisis | WAMC

crisis

Book cover for Crisis Lawyering
NYU Press

When it comes to responding to a modern-day crisis – whether it be a global pandemic, extreme weather event or an attempt to overthrow our democracy – lawyers are playing an increasingly critical role.

Eric Stern, a professor at the College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity at the University at Albany and Ray Brescia, a professor of law at Albany Law School, formed a cross-disciplinary partnership to better understand this emerging and complex field.

Their new book, “Crisis Lawyering: Effective Legal Advocacy in Emergency Situations,” published through NYU Press, offers key insights, strategies and tactics to lawyers who deal with a range of crisis situations on a regular basis. Eric Stern and Ray Brescia join us.

In California, wildfires now rage year-round, destroying thousands of homes. Across the US, “500-year” storms pummel communities month after month, and floods displace tens of millions annually. This is only a preview of the changes to come. And they are coming fast. Without a revolution in how billions of humans conduct their lives, parts of the Earth could become close to uninhabitable, and other parts horrifically inhospitable, as soon as the end of this century.

In "The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming," David Wallace-Wells brings into stark relief the climate troubles that await: food shortages, refugee emergencies, and other crises that will reshape the globe.

David Wallace-Wells is a national fellow at the New America foundation and a columnist and deputy editor at New York magazine.

Scott Silverstone is an ASU Future of War Fellow at New America and a professor of international relations at the United States Military Academy at West Point. His new book, "From Hitler's Germany to Saddam's Iraq: The Enduring False Promise of Preventive War."

This book challenges conventional wisdom about the value of preventive war. Beginning with the rise of German power and the French and British response to the Rhineland crisis leading to World War II, Silverstone overturns the common impulse to point an accusing finger at British leadership for its alleged naïveté, willful blindness, or outright cowardice.

Silverstone argues that the Rhineland crisis is a critical case for studying a central dynamic of world history - power shifts among states - and the preventive war temptation that power shifts frequently produce.

Author Ben Fountain's, "Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk" won the National Book Critics Circle Award and was a finalist for the National Book Award. The book was then adapted for the screen by three-time Oscar winner, Ang Lee. 

The latest book from Ben Fountain is titled, "Beautiful Country Burn Again: Democracy, Rebellion, and Revolution". Fountain writes, "twice before in history the United States has been faced with a crisis so severe it was forced to reinvent itself to survive. First slavery, second the Great Depression and now where we are politically."

"Beautiful Country Burn Again" is a sequence of essays that excavate the past while laying bare the political upheavel of 2016.Fountain argues that the United States may be facing a third such crisis one that will require a burning of the old order as America attempts to remake itself. Joining us today is Ben Fountain.

The global advertising industry, the invisible fuel powering media and commerce, is in crisis. Of all the industries impacted by the digital age, few have changed as dramatically as advertising and marketing.

Today’s consumers are distracted, glued to mobile devices, and accustomed to dodging ads. And those vying for their attention, advertising agencies, tech companies, and clients of both, have formed a web of frenemies that compete, cooperate, and distrust one another all at the same time.

As Madison Avenue and Silicon Valley wrangle for influence, bestselling author and veteran New Yorker columnist Ken Auletta lifts the veil on this industry in flux. "Frenemies: The Epic Disruption of the Ad Business (and Everything Else)" is the story of a world whose fate is imperiled and why that fate matters to us all.

  When the news broke in 1975 that New York City was on the brink of fiscal collapse, few believed it was possible. How could the country’s largest metropolis fail? How could the capital of the financial world go bankrupt? Yet the city was indeed billions of dollars in the red, with no way to pay back its debts. Bankers and politicians alike seized upon the situation as evidence that social liberalism, which New York famously exemplified, was unworkable. The city had to slash services, freeze wages, and fire thousands of workers, they insisted, or financial apocalypse would ensue.

In Fear City: New York's Fiscal Crisis and the Rise of Austerity Politics, historian Kim Phillips-Fein tells the remarkable story of the crisis that engulfed the city.

  Daniel Shapiro, Ph.D., is founder and director of the Harvard International Negotiation Program and a world-renowned expert on conflict resolution. From advising leaders of war-torn countries to working with senior executives and families in crisis, Dan has helped thousands of organizations and individuals solve the problems that divide us. Drawing on these experiences and his practice-based research, he has developed a wealth of practical approaches to amplify influence and leadership—in business, in government, and in life.

His new book is Negotiating the Nonnegotiable: How to Resolve Your Most Emotionally Charged Conflicts.

  Every American president, when faced with a crisis, longs to take bold and decisive action. When American lives or vital interests are at stake, the public—and especially the news media and political opponents—expect aggressive leadership. But, contrary to the dramatizations of Hollywood, rarely does a president have that option.

  The modern-day European Union was crafted in large part to minimize built-in geopolitical tensions that historically have torn it apart.

As George Friedman demonstrates in Flashpoints: The Emerging Crisis In Europe, with a mix of rich history and cultural analysis, that design is failing.

  

  What happens when England’s dirtiest politician hires Shakespeare as his spin doctor?

Equivocation – a play by Bill Cain uses the English 17th century Gunpowder plot as a vehicle to demonstrate how politicians generate fear and create divisions to advance their own interests during times of crisis. Rhinebeck Theatre Society will present Equivocation for a two week run beginning on October 3rd.

    According to lawyer, Steven Harper, a noble profession is facing its defining moment. From law schools to the prestigious firms that represent the pinnacle of a legal career, a crisis is unfolding.

Harper joins us to talk about The Lawyer Bubble: A Profession in Crisis .