Clinical Chemistry

If you want to learn how to be a better doctor or scientist you should go talk to a pilot. Next time on The Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll do that…talk to a pilot who is also a scientist about how medicine should take a page from aviation’s book.

We’ll also spend an academic minute trying to get baby boomers back to college.

Masa Israel Journey.

  

More and more students in the US are choosing to take a “gap year”…a 12 month break from school between high school and college to travel and experience the world. In fact there is one country that is actively encouraging those students to come on down and take that gap year with them.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, a conversation about Masa Israel Journey.

#1395: "GED Works!"

Jun 15, 2017

A couple of years ago, a group of major employers in the US got together to provide their employees with a path to complete an important part of their education. And we’re not talking about technical education or masters degrees.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll learn about GED Works…and how this program can help employees finally get their GED.

Washington Post

The first time new Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos tried to visit a school her first week on the job, she was blocked by protesters. It was an unsettling debut for one of the most controversial cabinet appointments, ever, from nomination to confirmation. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll hear from Secretary DeVos, as she addressed members of the department of Education her first day on the job.

We’ll also hear how companies who specialize in big data are making money off your medical records…and spend an Academic Minute getting thirsty at bedtime.

Just about every school in the US, maybe even the world has some basic items. Chairs and desks and bathrooms with unusual aromas. They also have textbooks. Now, the editor of one of the most respected science textbooks in the world is hoping to revolutionize the way textbooks are put together.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge we’ll talk about the latest version of the Tietz Textbook.

We’ll also go to a camp where girls are encouraged to build and become engineers…and we’ll spend an academic minute thinking about extinction.

Traveling by air has never been safer. For years, airlines have put practices and procedures in place that make flying a safe, if not entirely comfortable experience. And a lot of people could learn a thing or two from their efforts. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk to a pilot who is also a doctor and clinical chemist, about what the world of medicine could learn from the world of aviation.

And since we’re spending some time talking about flying, we’ll spend an academic minute underground talking about caves.

USADA

If you’re a sports fan, this has to be a great time of year for you. First of all, the Olympics are everywhere. Then there’s the baseball pennant races, College and Pro Football getting underway. Student athletes of all ages from Pee Wee to Division One will be doing their best to be their best on the field. But for athletes of any age or experience level, that sometimes means taking performance enhancing drugs.

Siena College

When you stop and think about it, a bachelor’s degree in, well just about anything, is pretty much a one size fits all exercise.  Students take the same classes from the same instructors and take the same exams. But that could be changing. So after talking about degrees in Homeland Security and Gaming in the past two weeks, today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll hear about a new customizable business degree program.

We’ll also talk about big data…it’s everywhere.

And we’ll spend an academic minute with the story of the only female governor in the US to die in office.

Science has given us a way to have our individual genomes sequenced, opening up a vault of information about our genetic makeup and possibly our future health. But if information is generated…there will be people trying to get a hold of it.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, just how private are your genetic building blocks?

Next we’ll go from science to history and find out about a newly discovered letter that may shed light on the presidential election of 1876.

Equator Network

It takes a long to time research and report findings in a scientific journal.

So after all that work, you’d like of think those scientists would be good at actually writing the reports. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll hear about STARD, a statement of standards for scientific reporting. And how they’re being updated.

We’ll also hear about the lights being used to study Lake Champlain, learn about efforts to save a dying language in the Northwest and spend an academic minute exploring your inner feelings about the United Nations.

Looks like summer’s in the home stretch and soon the Friday and Saturday night lights will be fired up all over the country and another football season will be underway. Student athletes of all ages from Pee Wee to Division One will be doing their best to be their best on the field. But for athletes of any age or experience level, that sometimes means taking performance enhancing drugs.

If someone tells you they are a science teacher…think about it, that really doesn’t narrow it down a whole lot. Earth science, chemistry, biology, astronomy, physics…these are all taught by science teachers. But it takes a special person to teach ocean science when there isn’t an ocean for hundreds of miles.

Today on the Best Of Our Knowledge, we’ll hear the story of an ocean science teacher in a land locked state.

Over the years we’ve heard about the fight against Big Oil, Big Tobacco and, everyone’s favorite, Big Government. Well now we’re hearing about Big Data. Companies are using your data to sell you stuff…but scientists are using it in other ways. Today on the Best Of Our Knowledge, a discussion on how clinical scientists are using big data.

We’ll also hear how fertility treatments have worked miracles for women and couples trying to have children. But those treatments have also opened up other doors, including the ability to manipulate genes and quote: build a better baby.

Over the years we’ve heard about the fight against Big Oil, Big Tobacco and, everyone’s favorite, Big Government. Well now we’re hearing about Big Data. Companies are using your data to sell you stuff…but scientists are using it in other ways. Today on the Best Of Our Knowledge, a discussion on how clinical scientists are using big data.

We’ll also hear how fertility treatments have worked miracles for women and couples trying to have children. But those treatments have also opened up other doors, including the ability to manipulate genes and quote: build a better baby.

Mayo Clinic dot org

We’ve talked a lot about genetic testing on this program over the past year or so. The amount of data that can come from the human genome seems to be growing by the day.

And there are companies that are using that data to market genetic tests for home use. Today on the Best Of Our Knowledge, we’ll hear about a test called 23 and Me…and find out why the FDA has banned it from being used as a genetic health screen in the US.

The advances made in the past decade or so in genetic testing have been astounding…and research in this area continues to go forward in labs and universities across the country. But there’s another place genetic tests are starting to pop up: homes. Today on the Best Of Our Knowledge, we’ll hear about the growth of in-home genetic testing and why this d0 it yourself trend may not always be a good idea.

We’ll also hear the story of a couple a veterans who are using training of the mind to leave the battles of war behind.

Order the same dish and three different restaurants and you’ll probably get three different flavors. No big deal, right? But it seems if you send a blood sample off to three different clinical labs for test results…you may get three different results.  And that IS a big deal. Today on the Best Of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk about the need for harmonization of laboratory methods and results.

We’ll also hear an interview with a professor of journalism and government about the need for knowledge-based journalism…and how could we resist that on this program.

The Friday and Saturday night lights have started around the country…another football season is underway and students of all ages from Pee Wee to Division One are doing their best to be their best on the field. But for athletes of any age or experience level, that sometimes means taking performance enhancing drugs.

Today on the Best Of Our Knowledge, we’ll feature two unique points of view on testing for PEDs. One who says the system is working…the other who says scrap it and let them eat steroids.

Unlocking to human genome was a tremendous accomplishment…and it really didn’t happen that long ago. Scientists can now map your unique genetic fingerprint, so to speak…paving the way for personalized health care…and perhaps high tech identity theft. Today on the Best Of Our Knowledge, we’ll hear about the challenges of maintaining privacy in the information age.

Then we’ll hear about students going beyond the borders of their own country to find a college or university. And we'll spend an academic minute with a look at the struggle between eco-tourism and industry.

When it comes to learning all there is to know about Earth oceans, we've only scratched the surface...or waded in knee deep if you want an ocean metaphor. But when it comes to educating people about the waves of new information being learn about the sea...there is no Jacques Cousteau of the new millennium to spread the word. Today on the Best Of Our Knowledge, we'll talk about the challenge of bringing the ocean into the classroom.

It’s no secret that at a time when even people with college degrees are having trouble finding a good job, the growing number of people who fail to even finish high school is a growing problem in many American cities.

Today on the Best Of Our Knowledge, we'll hear what a city in Ohio is trying to do about the problem.

We’ll also hear from a high school senior who has been a target for colleges around the country…for years. Then it’s a trip to the lab where scientists are trying to turn “o-mics” into personalized medicine.

Recently, the technology company Qualcomm announced a 10 million dollar prize to anyone who can invent a medical tricorder.  That's right, the machine that Dr. McCoy used in Star Trek to diagnose everything from  Rigellian Fever to the Phage. The thing is, doctors are already using hand held technology to do some diagnosis...smart phone.

Today on the Best Of Our Knowledge, we'll hear how doctors in Africa are using smart phones to fight disease.

Fertility treatments have worked miracles for women and couples trying to have children. But those treatments have also open up other doors, including the ability to manipulate genes and quote: build a better baby.

Today on the Best Of Our Knowledge, a discussion on the ethics of embryonic genetics.

We'll also hear from a mother who wants to someday hear her deaf son say "I love you". Then the story of the opening of an independent book store...with actual books. And we’ll spend an academic minute with your genes and your jeans.

University of Alabama

It wasn’t that long ago that scientists unlocked the human genome. Now, your unique genetic sequence can be mapped, paving the way for personalized health care…and perhaps high tech identity theft.

Today on the Best Of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk to Dr. Bruce Korf from the department of Genomics at the University of Alabama at Birmingham about the challenges of maintaining privacy in the information age.

We’ll also visit a school in the northeast that has been getting along quite well without a principal…and we’ll spend an academic minute making you want to scream.