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Climate

In "The Future We Choose," Christiana Figueres and Tom Rivett-Carnac, who led negotiations for the United Nations during the historic Paris Agreement of 2015, have written a cautionary but optimistic book about the world's changing climate and the fate of humanity.

The authors outline two possible scenarios for our planet. In one, they describe what life on Earth will be like by 2050 if we fail to meet the Paris climate targets. In the other, they lay out what it will be like to live in a carbon neutral, regenerative world.

Tom Rivett-Carnac joined us.

Dr. James Hansen
https://blogs.ei.columbia.edu/

**We weren't able to conduct the scheduled interview with Dr. James Hansen but leave this post on our site to provide information about the summit.**

The Woodstock Day School and the Ashokan Center have teamed up to co-sponsor The Youth Empowerment & Sustainability Summit (YESS!); a global climate solution and leadership summit for young people who are ready to change their lives and their communities by working towards climate resilience.

The three-day summit is designed to empower students from middle school through college by teaching them to develop solutions-based thinking and civic engagement skills.

Dr. James Hansen, the renowned climate scientist who was among the first to sound the alarm of global climate change.

He delivered the summit’s keynote address this morning at Ashokan Center and tonight he’ll present a “Catskill Conversations” talk sponsored by the Ashokan Center at Kingston High School at 7 p.m. Tonight’s talk is open to the public.

Vermont Statehouse
Pat Bradley/WAMC

Nearly 30 advocacy organizations outlined a 2020 Climate Action Plan at the Vermont Statehouse this week. The groups say the proposed polices would enact critical environmental policies while strengthening Vermont’s economy.

Photograph of the Earth taken on December 7, 1972, by the crew of the Apollo 17
Public Domain / NASA

Last year was the second-hottest year on record. That was the conclusion at the 100th American Meteorological Society Annual Meeting in Boston, where experts from NASA and NOAA discussed major climate trends detailed in an annual assessment of global temperatures.

As humanity marches on, causing mass extinctions and destabilizing the climate, the future of Earth will very much reflect the stories that Homo sapiens decides to jettison or accept today into our collective identity. At this pivotal moment in history, the most important story we can be telling ourselves is that humans are not inherently destructive.

In "Changing Tides" Alejandro Frid tackles the big questions: who, or what, represents our essential selves, and what stories might allow us to shift the collective psyche of industrial civilization in time to avert the worst of the climate and biodiversity crises?

Activists Plan Climate Rally In Poughkeepsie

Oct 13, 2019

Climate activists and organizations from across New York will gather in Poughkeepsie Sunday afternoon.

Plattsburgh college and high school students and residents gather at Amity Plaza during Global Climate Strike
Pat Bradley/WAMC

High school and college students were joined by local residents outside the SUNY Plattsburgh student center to participate in the Global Climate Strike.

NASA

The UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has released a new report that dives into land use and how it relates on climate change.

"Grand Canyon For Sale" by Stephen Nash is an investigation of the precarious future of America’s public lands: our national parks, forests, wildlife refuges, monuments, and wildernesses. Taking the Grand Canyon as his key example, and using on-the-ground reporting as well as scientific research, Stephen Nash shows how accelerating climate change will dislocate wildlife populations and vegetation across hundreds of thousands of square miles of the national landscape.

Lesley-Anne Dupigny-Giroux
Photo by Sally McCay / University of Vermont

On Friday, the federal government released the Fourth National Climate Assessment.  The report determines that if intensive actions are not taken to curb greenhouse gas emissions and regional initiatives implemented to adapt, there will be severe ramifications for the climate and human health, infrastructure and the economy. The report presents overall findings and also breaks into segments to assess the impacts on areas such as agriculture, transportation, air quality and human health.  It telescopes to individual regions of the country, finding, among other things, that the Northeast’s seasonality is at risk, which in turn threatens the region’s economy.   Vermont state climatologist and University of Vermont Professor of Geography Lesley-Anne Dupigny-Giroux is the lead author of the Northeast chapter of the Fourth National Climate Assessment.  She  was selected from among 200 scientists to lead the Northeast chapter.

Students listen to Senator Bernie Sanders at UVM Rally for Climate Action at UVM
Pat Bradley/WAMC

Students at the University Of Vermont held a “Rally For Climate Action” on Monday.  They heard from political leaders including Senator Bernie Sanders and Congressman Peter Welch about what is happening, or not, in the halls of power — and what is at risk for the younger generation from climate change.

Governor Phil Scott (left) and Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger launch the Vermont Climate Pledge Coalition
Pat Bradley/WAMC

Vermont environmental, municipal and state officials were at the ECHO Center for Lake Champlain this week to announce the launch of a new coalition to help bridge the environmental chasm caused when President Trump withdrew the U.S. from the Paris Climate Accord.

Burlington, Vermont’s mayor has joined more than 200 others in signing an open letter declaring that they will continue to support the Paris Climate Agreement after the president promised to pull the U.S. out.

Hudson Valley To Hold Sister Climate Marches

Apr 28, 2017

The Hudson Valley is the site of at least two sister marches to the People’s Climate March in Washington, D.C. Saturday.

From the author of House Arrest and On Hurricane Island comes a thrilling new activist novel that begs the question, “How far is too far?”

Jeremy was nine when the vines first wrapped themselves around him and burrowed into his skin. Now a college botany major, Jeremy is desperately looking for a way to listen to the plants and stave off their extinction.

But when the grip of the vines becomes too intense and Health Services starts asking questions, he flees to Brooklyn, where fate puts him face to face with a group of climate-justice activists who assure him they have a plan to save the planet, and his plants. As the group readies itself to make a big Earth Day splash, Jeremy soon realizes these eco-terrorists’ devotion to activism might have him ― and those closest to him ― tangled up in more trouble than he was prepared to face.

Ellen Meeropol's latest is Kinship of Clover – published by Red Hen Press. 

The University of Vermont brought high school students from across Vermont and northern New York to its campus today for its third annual youth climate summit.

An international conference is kicking off today in Burlington. It helps bring the science of climate change to those who implement policy and create practical applications for climate science.

NASA

New York's top environmental official Basil Seggos says the state has cut air pollution and improved water quality but global warming now presents the greatest long-term threat to people.

Winter's On A Roll

Feb 9, 2015
WAMC Photo by Dave Lucas

The latest storm is upon us, and once again the region is dealing with slippery commutes, snow emergencies, and school closings and delays.

It's a "rinse and repeat" playback of last Monday: roads in poor condition from Rochester back through the Mohawk Valley, Hudson Valley eastward into New England and points south.  Conditions are expected to improve once the snow stops falling and the plows keep plowing.

8/27/14 Panel

Aug 27, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, newsman Ray Graf, and Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include:
US Allies
Climate Accord
No NYT Endorsement
If Britain Were a State...
Legroom Fight

Launched in Albany Thursday, the New York Rising Community Construction program’s goal is to empower localities to develop and implement recovery plans after the damage done by storms Sandy, Lee and Irene, and more recently, by the severe flooding in the Mohawk Valley caused by heavy rains in late June. 

No surprise for Northeast residents sweating out the summer after a winter barely touching their snow shovels: this is the hottest year on record in the region so far.

The Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University reported Tuesday that the average temperature in the 12-state region was 49.9 degrees from January through July. That's the warmest seven-month period since 1895, the year systematic record keeping began.
   
The second-warmest comparable period was 1921, when the seven-month average was 49.2 degrees.