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  The ornamental motif known as arabesque has ancient sources and first appeared in Islamic cultures as a form of sacred writing. It figures in key movements in European art, bridging cultures and materials, arabesque did not settle into a single form or style.

 

The nineteenth-century flowering of this motif is featured in the Clark Art Institute exhibition “Arabesque,” on view at the Williamstown, Massachusetts museum through March 22.

 

Anne Leonard, the Manton Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs, and curator of the exhibition, takes us on an audio tour and discusses several of the featured works.

The exhibition “Ida O’Keeffe: Escaping Georgia’s Shadow” brings together thirty-five paintings, prints, and photographs exploring the artist’s mastery of color and composition as well as her complex relationship with her well-known sister, Georgia. The show will be on view at the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts through October 14.

Organized by the Dallas Museum of Art and curated by Sue Canterbury, The Pauline Gill Sullivan Associate Curator of American Art, the exhibition debuted in Dallas in 2018 and is the first ever solo museum exhibition of works by Ida Ten Eyck O’Keeffe and the most comprehensive survey of the artist’s work to date.

Robert Wiesenberger is the Associate Curator of Contemporary Projects at The Clark and he led us through the exhibition.

The Concert, 1918–19. Oil on canvas, 29 3/4 x 36 1/2 in. Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto. Gift of Reuben Wells Leonard Estate, 1954, 53/27
Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Over the course of his long career, French painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir continually turned to the human figure for artistic inspiration. Renoir was born in 1841 and died a century ago in 1919. To observe the centenary of his death, the Clark Art Institute and the Kimbell Art Museum present the new exhibition, “Renoir: The Body, The Senses.” Include paintings, drawings, pastels, and sculptures by Renoir as well as works by his predecessors, contemporaries, and followers, the exhibition is on display at The Clark in Williamstown, Massachusetts through September 22.

“Renoir: The Body, The Senses” features works from The Clark’s collection and loans from all around the world. It was co-organized by Esther Bell, the Robert and Martha Berman Lipp Chief Curator at the Clark, and George T. M. Shackelford, Deputy Director at the Kimbell.

Esther Bell lead us through the exhibition.

Artists Joseph Mallord William Turner and John Constable rose to prominence as landscape painters in early nineteenth–century England. Their choices of subjects and the way in which they composed their views, together with innovative brushwork, helped elevate a traditionally overlooked genre.

The Clark’s exhibition “Turner and Constable: The Inhabited Landscape” features more than fifty oil paintings, watercolors, drawings, and prints and will be on view in Williamstown, Massachusetts through March 10. Curator Alexis Goodin leads us on a gallery tour.

Michael Pisaro’s “A Wave and Waves” performance on Sunday at 1p.m. at The Clark Art Museum in Williamstown, MA is a rare, deep listening experience in which listeners are immersed in an ocean of sound. Colossal percussive waves are created by layers of imperceptibly soft sounds: sandpaper on stone, seeds falling on glass, bowed bells; which form a textural landscape bristling with detail. The 74-minute work employs 100 performers, arranged on a grid, with the audience embedded within.

There will be two separate performances at The Clark on Sunday -- the first is a 74 minute performance. It will be conducted by Matthew Gold and features performers including members of the Talujon Percussion Ensemble, the Williams Percussion Ensemble and guests from the community. The second is a performance by Talujon.

Matthew Gold is the Artist in Residence in Percussion and Contemporary Music Performance at Williams College and will be conducting Sunday’s performance. 

The Clark Art Institute’s summer 2018 exhibition, “Women Artists in Paris, 1850–1900,” celebrates an international group of artists who overcame gender-based restrictions to make extraordinary creative strides, taking important steps in the fight for a more egalitarian art world. It is on view in Williamstown through September 3.

In addition to “Women Artists in Paris,” The Clark is the exclusive venue for the exhibition “The Art of Iron: Objects from the Musée Le Secq des Tournelles, Rouen, Normandy.” The exhibition presents thirty-six historic objects in an installation celebrating the craft and beauty of wrought iron. That exhibition is on view through September 16th.

(Left) Grille, Italian, 18th century. Wrought iron, polychromed, 33 7/8 x 25 5/8 x 1 5/8 in. Réunion des Musées Métropolitains, Rouen, Normandy, LS.4513 (Right) Circular Grille, French (Amiens), c. 1700. Wrought iron and rolled iron, cut and embossed, 39 3/8 diameter x 2 3/4 in. Réunion des Musées Métropolitains, Rouen, Normandy, LS.4231 Edit | Remove

Halley Feiffer
Kirk McCoy / LA Times

Halley Feiffer is a writer and actor. Her plays include "I'm Gonna Pray For You So Hard," "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Gynecologic Oncology Unit at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center of New York City," and "How to Make Friends and Then Kill Them." Her play "Moscow, Moscow, Moscow, Moscow, Moscow, Moscow" had its world premiere at The Williamstown Theatre Festival last summer. She has appeared on Broadway in "The Front Page" with Nathan Lane and "The House of Blue Leaves" with Edie Falco. 

Tomorrow afternoon at 3 o'clock there will be a Fridays@3 reading of Feiffer's new play, "Saying Goodbye to the People I Love From My Bathtub." Fridays@3 readings take place at The Clark Auditorium.

© 2017 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Picasso: Encounters has been on view exclusively at The Clark Art Institute this summer and will close this coming Sunday, August 27.

The exhibition estigates how Pablo Picasso’s creative collaborations fueled and strengthened his art, challenging the notion of Picasso as an artist alone with his craft. The exhibition addresses his full stylistic range, the narrative themes that drove his creative process, the often-neglected issue of the collaboration inherent in print production, and the muses that inspired him.

We spoke about the exhibition with Jay Clarke - the Manton Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs at the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute.


  The exhibition, An Inner World: Seventeenth-Century Dutch Genre Painting at The Clark in Williamstown, MA features seven genre paintings by Dutch artists working in or near the city of Leiden in the seventeenth century. Genre paintings, or scenes that take everyday life as their subject matter, flourished in the Dutch Republic in this period.

 

Based around The Clark’s own Girl at a Window by Gerrit Dou, the exhibition is scheduled to be on display through October 1st. We went to the museum recently and spoke with Alexis Goodin, Co-Curator and Curatorial Research Assistant at The Clark.

 Japanese Impressions: Color Woodblock Prints from the Rodbell Family Collection is the first exhibition at the Clark to focus on the Institute’s permanent collection of Japanese prints. The exhibition spans more than a century of Japanese color woodblock printing as represented by three generations of artists who produced prints from the 1830s to the 1970s.

We went to The Clark in Williamstown recently to check out the exhibition with Jay A. Clarke, the Manton Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs at the museum.

Jodi Picoult is the #1 bestselling author of twenty-six novels. Her latest novel is Small Great Things and she calls it her most personal novel to date.

Ruth Jefferson is a labor and delivery nurse at a Connecticut hospital with more than twenty years’ experience. During her shift, Ruth begins a routine checkup on a newborn, only to be told a few minutes later that she’s been reassigned to another patient. The parents are white supremacists and don’t want Ruth, who is African American, to touch their child. The hospital complies with their request, but the next day, the baby goes into cardiac distress while Ruth is alone in the nursery. Does she obey orders or does she intervene?

She will be at The Clark in Williamstown, MA on Saturday, October 8th giving two author talks followed by book signings. 

  Splendor, Myth, and Vision: Nudes from the Prado is the current exhibition at The Clark in Williamstown, MA.

The exhibition features twenty-eight Old Master paintings from the Museo Nacional del Prado in Madrid by Titian, Peter Paul Rubens, and many others. The exhibition explores the role of the nude in European painting in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and the collecting and display practices of the Spanish royalty.

We are taken on a tour of the exhibition by The Clark's Kathleen Morris, Sylvia and Leonard Marx Director of Collections and Exhibitions and curator of decorative arts; and Lara Yeager-Crasselt, interim curator of paintings and sculpture.