chronic illness | WAMC

chronic illness

Brian Platzer has an MFA from the Johns Hopkins Writing Seminars, and a BA from Columbia University. His writing has appeared often in The New Yorker’s “Shouts and Murmurs” and McSweeney’s “Internet Tendency,” as well as in The New York Times, The New Republic, Salon, and elsewhere.

He is the author of the novels "Bed-Stuy Is Burning" and now "The Body Politic."

The new novel explores the meaning of commitment, the nature of forgiveness, the way that buried secrets will always find their way to the surface, and how all of it can shift—and eventually erupt—over the course of a life.

Having an illness or a disability is stressful. It brings up lots of negative emotions such as fear, anger, sadness, and anxiety. It's easy to get caught up in, or commiserate around, these feelings. But study after study shows that stress is detrimental to the body and mind. Physically, it weakens the immune system and is connected to a host of illnesses. Mentally, stress breeds more stress, making it debilitating and contagious.

For someone living with a disease or disability, stress and negative energy can further compromise health and impact relationships with those most important – families, friends, and caretakers. Because of this, Beyond My Battle focuses on helping people with diseases and disabilities get to the root of their stress so they can better detect, manage, and reduce it.

Beyond My Battle is a not-for-profit organization founded by Martel Catalano and Nell Pritchard in 2016. “Beyond My Battle: Art with Heart & Hope” is an exhibition celebrating the healing power of art for those with illnesses, disabilities, and caretakers. The event will take place on May 9 from 6-9 p.m. at Spring Street Gallery in Saratoga Springs, New York.

Richard M. Cohen is the author of two New York Times bestsellers: a memoir, "Blindsided," detailing his struggles with MS and cancer and his controversial career in the news business; and "Strong at the Broken Places," following the lives of five individuals living with serious chronic illnesses. His distinguished career in network news earned him numerous awards, including three Emmys and a Peabody.

After more than four decades living with multiple sclerosis, New York Times bestselling author Richard M. Cohen finds a flicker of hope in a groundbreaking medical procedure. His new book is "Chasing Hope."

It's happened to all of us: our cheeks flush red when we say the wrong thing, or our hearts skip a beat when a certain someone walks by. But few of us realize how much more dramatic and extreme our bodies' reactions to emotions can be. Many people who see their doctor have medically unexplained symptoms, and in the vast majority of these cases, a psychosomatic cause is suspected. And yet, the diagnosis of a psychosomatic disorder can make a patient feel dismissed as a hypochondriac, a faker, or just plain crazy.
 
In Is It All in Your Head?: True Stories of Imaginary Illness, Suzanne O'Sullivan, MD, takes us on a journey through the world of psychosomatic illness.

Joe Donahue speaks with Tamara McClintock Greenberg about her book, When Someone You Love Has a Chronic Illness: Hope and Help for Those Providing Support.