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In a world in which the word masculinity now often goes hand in hand with toxic, comedian, actor, and father Michael Ian Black offers up a way forward for boys, men, and anyone who loves them. Part memoir, part advice book, and written as a heartfelt letter to his college-bound son, "A Better Man" reveals Black’s own complicated relationship with his father, explores the damage and rising violence caused by the expectations placed on boys to “man up,” and searches for the best way to help young men be part of the solution, not the problem.

Proponents of large-scale learning have boldly promised that technology can disrupt traditional approaches to schooling, radically accelerating learning and democratizing education. In "Failure to Disrupt: Why Technology Alone Can’t Transform Education," Justin Reich delivers a sobering report card on the latest supposedly transformative educational technologies.

Reich takes readers on a tour of auto-graders, computerized “intelligent tutors,” and other educational technologies whose problems and paradoxes have bedeviled educators. Technology does have a crucial role to play in the future of education, Reich concludes. We still need new teaching tools, and classroom experimentation should be encouraged. But successful reform efforts will focus on incremental improvements, not the next killer app.

We are in the middle of a cultural revolution, where the spectrum of gender and sexual identities is seemingly unlimited. So when author and journalist Lisa Selin Davis's six-year-old daughter first called herself a "tomboy," Davis was hesitant.

Her child favored sweatpants and T-shirts over anything pink or princess-themed, just like the sporty, skinned-kneed girls Davis had played with as a kid. But "tomboy" seemed like an outdated word--why use a word with "boy" in it for such girls at all? So was it outdated?

In an era where some are throwing elaborate gender reveal parties and others are embracing they/them pronouns, Davis set out to answer that question, and to find out where tomboys fit into our changing understandings of gender.

The name of the book is "Tomboy: The Surprising History and Future of Girls Who Dare to Be Different."

Grandmother Maple at Flying Deer Nature Center
Sarah LaDuke

Flying Deer Nature Center in East Chatham, New York is a wilderness school and community dedicated to mentoring children, adults, and families in deep connection to nature, self, and others.

The staff at Flying Deer guide people of all ages in school and homeschool programs, summer camps, corporate curriculums, rites-of-passage experiences, and adult programs - facilitating a full nature immersion.

For my semi-immersion, Executive Director Michelle Apland and Program Director Devin Franklin led me around.

Parents live in a culture obsessed with their children and their own outcomes, so they are highly susceptible to anxiety and perfectionism. Washington Post parenting columnist Meghan Leahy joins us to assuage our worries and overwhelm with her book, "Parenting Outside the Lines."

Leahy provides insights on how we can trust our gut, pick our battles, and how to assess what works best for our individual children. Leahy uses the lessons from the parenting trenches, common sense, and her nearly twenty years of experience helping families to create thoughtful questions that can help every parent find their own intuition. 

Meghan Leahy is the On Parenting columnist for The Washington Post, and a certified parenting coach. 

With catastrophic global warming already baked into the climate system, today's children face a future entirely unlike that of their parents. How can we maintain hope and make a difference in the face of overwhelming evidence of the climate crisis?

Harriet Sugarman, Executive Director of Climate Mama, Professor of Global Climate Change Policy and World Sustainability, and Chair of the Climate Reality Project is the author of the new book, "How to Talk to Your Kids About Climate Change," which provides tools and strategies for parents to explain the climate emergency to their kids and galvanize positive action.

Joe Donahue:  In an isolated estate on the Atlantic coast storms are brewing, waters are rising, and the world as we know it is inexorably shifting. This is the reality of Lydia Millet’s new novel, “A Children's Bible”, where a pack of kids and their middle aged parents are coexisting at this summer estate. The novel turns steadily darker as climate collapse and societal breakdown encroach. Millet is a senior editor at the Center for Biological Diversity, who regularly tackles environmental issues in her op-eds for the “New York Times”. She has long foregrounded the costs of climate change in her fiction, and “A Children's Bible” with scenes of quarantine and societal breakdown is no different. She has written 12 works of fiction including “Sweet Lamb of Heaven”, “Mermaids in Paradise” and “Love in Infant Monkeys”. 

Pawan Dhingra is Professor of American Studies at Amherst College. He is the author of many books, including "Life Behind the Lobby: Indian American Motel Owners and the American Dream." His work has been featured in the Boston Globe, the Washington Post, The New York Times, Salon, the PBS News Hour, and the documentary, "Breaking the Bee."

In "Hyper Education," he uncovers the growing world of high-achievement education and the after-school learning centers, spelling bees, and math competitions that it has spawned.

Joe Donahe: Journalist Lauren Sandler's new book "This Is All I Got: A New Mother's Search for Home" is an immersion in the life of a young homeless single mother amid her quest to find stability and shelter in the richest city in America. Camila is 22 years old and a new mother, she has no family to rely on, no partner, and no home. Sandler chronicles a year in Camila's life from birth of her son to his first birthday, as she navigates the labyrinth of poverty and homelessness in New York City.

Lauren Sandler as an award winning journalist. She is the author of three books, including the brand-new "This Is All I Got: A New Mother's Search for Home." 

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This morning we welcome Tim Hathaway, Executive Director, Prevent Child Abuse New York (PCANY.)

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This morning we focus on the Pat Wood Backpack Program at Schodack Central Schools. We welcome Castleton Elementary School Social Worker Jen Sober; Michelle Stilson- Maple Hill Jr./ Sr. High School Social Worker Michelle Stilson; and Maple Hill High School Teacher Rico Frese.

BTG PLAYS! 2019-2020 Touring Show is "Magic Tree House: Pirates Past Noon," based on the book "Magic Tree House: Pirates Past Noon" by Mary Pope Osborne. This musical features a book by Jenny Laird and Will Osborne, lyrics by Randy Courts and Will Osborne and music by Randy Courts, with direction by Travis Daly.

Magic Tree House: Pirates Past Noon is an adaptation of the fourth of Mary Pope Osborne's award-winning fantasy adventure books from the Magic Tree House book series, which has sold more than 100 million copies and is available in more than a hundred countries around the world.

BTG PLAYS! Touring Show is a part of Berkshire Theatre Group’s year-round education program, which reaches 13,000 school children annually. Beginning in October and running through the school year, this production is appropriate for elementary and middle school aged children and family audiences, and is designed to introduce students to the excitement of live theatre.

Deborah L. Rhode is the Ernest W. McFarland Professor of Law, and the director of the Center on the Legal Profession at Stanford University. She was the founding president of the International Association of Legal Ethics, the former president of the Association of American Law Schools, and the former founding director of Stanford's Center on Ethics. She is the nation's most frequently cited scholar on legal ethics and the author of 30 books in the fields of professional responsibility, leadership, and gender.

Her new book is "Character: What It Means and Why It Matters."

Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn, the Pulitzer Prize-winning authors of the acclaimed, best-selling "Half the Sky" now issue a plea, deeply personal and told through the lives of real Americans, to address the crisis in working-class America, while focusing on solutions to mend a half century of governmental failure.

Their new book is "Tightrope: Americans Reaching for Hope."

William Doyle is a New York Times bestselling author and TV producer for networks including HBO, The History Channel, and PBS. Since 2015 he has served as Fulbright Scholar, Scholar in Residence and Lecturer on Media and Education at University of Eastern Finland, a Rockefeller Foundation Resident Fellow, and advisor to the Ministry of Education and Culture of Finland.

With Pasi Sahlberg, Professor of Education Policy at Gonski Institute for Education, University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, Doyle has written the book "Let the Children Play: How More Play Will Save Our Schools and Help Children Thrive."

Paul Tough is the author of "Helping Children Succeed" and "How Children Succeed." He is also the author of "Whatever It Takes: Geoffrey Canada’s Quest to Change Harlem and America." He is a contributing writer to the New York Times Magazine and a regular contributor to the public-radio program "This American Life."

Tough's new book "The Years That Matter Most" tells the stories of students trying to find their way, with hope, joy, and frustration, through the application process and into college.

Drawing on new research, the book reveals how the landscape of higher education has shifted in recent decades and exposes the hidden truths of how the system works and whom it works for.

“Imaginary Friend” is the new novel, a horror story, by Stephen Chbosky. It comes 20 years after he wrote the bestselling coming-of-age novel "The Perks of Being a Wallflower." The new book raises questions about faith, parenting, friendship and what it means to protect those you love most in an increasingly complex and dangerous world.


  Dr. Marika Lindholm a sociologist and the founder of Empowering Solo Moms Everywhere and esme.com - a gathering place for solo mothers to discuss their experiences and find information about navigating the particular challenges or raising children alone. 

 

Lindholm is the co-editor of the new book “We Got This: Solo Mom Stories of Grit, Heart and Humor.” She will be at Oblong Books and Music in Rhinebeck, New York at 6pm on Friday, November 1.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

St. Catherine’s Center for Children in Albany, New York provides a comprehensive range of human services designed to offer hope, foster growth, and improve the lives of the children and families they serve. We are joined by St. Catherine’s Center for Children Executive Director Frank Pindiak and Director of Development Lisa Wallock.

jajjaskids.org

The Jajja’s Kids program is a collaboration between Jajja’s Kids, Inc. in the United States and Jajja’s Kids–Africa based in Kampala, Uganda. Together, they provide support for twenty children and the staff of six who care for them. The ultimate goal is for Jajja’s Kids–Africa to become a self-sustaining program offering former street children a chance to succeed in life.

The USA component of Jajja’s Kids, Inc. is an all-volunteer nonprofit organization in upstate New York. Jajja’s Kids 8th Annual Fundraiser will take place this Sunday, September 22 from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Revolution Hall in Troy, New York. The theme of this year's fall fundraiser is "Under One Sky" – based on the song written by Ruth Pelham.

We are joined by Jajja’s Kids, Inc. President Diane Reiner and Jajja’s Kids–Africa Program Director Ronnie Sseruyange.

How do you raise a reader in this ever changing world of technology, devices and other distractions? Screen time may often be more appealing than reading time for a child. But with reading known to be so important, how can a parent encourage kids to make reading a priority?

In the new book, "How to Raise a Reader," leading book authorities Pamela Paul - who oversees all book coverage at the New York Times, and Maria Russo - editor of children’s books at the Times - answer these urgent questions.

The book is divided into 4 stages of childhood—from babies to teens—and filled with practical tips, strategies that work, been-there wisdom, and inspirational advice.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise … see more progress.

This morning we’ll learn about the Children’s Museum of Science and Technology in the Rensselaer Technology Park from Executive Director Catherine Gilbert and Director of Education and Discovery Sarah Smith.

Rhett Miller is the frontman for rock band Old 97′s, a solo singer-songwriter, an essayist and a podcaster. And he’s also a father of two, which indirectly led to his newest gig of picture-book writer - his book is “No More Poems! A Book in Verse That Just Gets Worse.”

He started writing poems to share with his kids on the phone while he was on tour so he could talk with them longer. He’d read the poems aloud and get their feedback (sometimes brutal feedback.)

Between albums with the band, Miller has squeezed in seven solo records—most recently last year’s "The Messenger." His latest offering is a new podcast, "Wheels Off," which finds him interviewing musicians, writers, artists, actors, and comedians about creativity. 

  Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between-not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation: Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This morning we learn about Sleep in Heavenly Peace, a not-for-profit that makes and delivers beds to kids without beds. We welcome James Welch and Beth Heffern.

Dr. W. Thomas Boyce is a pediatrician and Distinguished Professor Emeritus in the Departments of Pediatrics and Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Boyce's research addresses individual differences in children’s biological sensitivity to social contexts, such as the family, classroom and community.

In his new book, "The Orchid and the Dandelion," he explores the "dandelion" child (hardy, resilient, healthy), able to survive and flourish under most circumstances, and the "orchid" child (sensitive, susceptible, fragile), who, given the right support, can thrive as much as, if not more than, other children.

Boyce writes of his pathfinding research as a developmental pediatrician working with troubled children in child-development research for almost four decades, and explores his major discovery that reveals how genetic make-up and environment shape behavior.

The Make-A-Wish Foundation has been serving a unique, and vital, role in helping strengthen and empower children battling critical illnesses since 1980.

The original wish-granters Kay and Tommy Austin will be special guests at the Make-A-Wish Northeast New York Gala on March 23 at the Hall of Springs in Saratoga Springs, New York. The event will focus on the mission of the local organization, with Wish Kids and families in attendance to share their stories, and the Austins will represent Wish Granters, the volunteers vital to turning wishes into actual experiences.

We are joined by Tommy Austin and CEO of Make-A-Wish Northeast New York, William C. Trigg, III.

Our “Falling into Place” series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place. “Falling Into Place” is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This week we are learning about the Boys & Girls Club of the Capital Area – the Albany and Troy Clubs have just merged. To tell us all about it we welcome: Boys & Girls Clubs of the Capital Area’s Chief Executive Officer Justin Reuter and Chief Operations Officer Patrick Doyle.

Young people are usually eager to change the world, but not given a chance. Eric Dawson's new book "Putting Peace First: 7 Commitments To Change The World" empowers young people to make change happen now. Eric David Dawson is the CEO and Co-founder of Peace First.

Harriet Brown is the author of "Body of Truth" and "Brave Girl Eating." She has edited two anthologies and has written for the New York Times Magazine, O Magazine, Psychology Today, Prevention, and many other publications. She is a professor of magazine journalism at the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University.

In "Shadow Daughter," she tackles a subject we rarely discuss as a culture: family estrangements. Despite the fact that the issue touches most people one way or another, estrangement is still shrouded in secrecy, stigma, and shame. We simply don't talk about it, and that silence can make an already difficult situation even harder.

Brown tells her story with clear-eyed honesty and hard-won wisdom; she also shared interviews with others who are estranged, as well as the most recent research on this taboo topic."

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This week we focus on the South End Children's Café in Albany where they provide nutritious meals, nutrition awareness, a food pantry, arts & crafts, after-school homework assistance, etc. for many neighborhood kids and their families.

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