cambodia

Sydney Schanberg at work in Cambodia.
Dith Pran

(Airs 5/10/18 @ 1 p.m.) WAMC’s Alan Chartock in a 2010 encore conversation with the late Pulitzer Prize winning Journalist Syndey Schanberg and Actor Sam Waterston about the Killing Fields, the movie inspired by Schanberg’s coverage of the civil war in Cambodia during the 1970s. Schanberg was portrayed by the actor Sam Waterston, who earned an Academy Award nomination for the performance. In 2010, the two came together for an interview with WAMC's Alan Chartock, discussing Schanberg's book Beyond The Killing Fields and their lives before, during and after the war (and the movie it inspired).

  He was a 19-year-old sailor ashore in Japan. She was a 31-year-old Japanese woman. This is the beginning to the memoir, Please Enjoy Your Happiness - the story of Paul Brinkley-Rogers, former sailor and Pulitzer-winning journalist.

The author talks of 1959 and the lingering impact of the woman he left behind a lifetime ago.

For many years Paul Brinkley-Rogers worked in Asia as a staff member of Newsweek, covering the wars in Vietnam and Cambodia, the death of Chairman Mao, and Japan's economic miracle. He also reported from Latin America for The Miami Herald, sharing the Pulitzer Prize with a reporting team in 2001 for coverage of the Elian Gonzalez custody battle.

  In his new book, Kissinger’s Shadow: The Long Reach of America’s Most Controversial Statesman, acclaimed historian Greg Grandin argues that to understand our never-ending wars abroad and political polarization at home--we have to understand Henry Kissinger.

Examining Kissinger's own writings, as well as a wealth of newly declassified documents, Grandin reveals how Richard Nixon's top foreign policy advisor, even as he was presiding over defeat in Vietnam and a disastrous, secret, and illegal war in Cambodia, was helping to revive a militarized version of American exceptionalism centered on an imperial presidency.

Going beyond accounts focusing either on Kissinger's crimes or accomplishments, Grandin offers a compelling new interpretation of the diplomat's continuing influence on how the United States views its role in the world. Greg Grandin is an author and professor of history at New York University.