broadcaster

Dan Rather in a trench coat, dark red tie, holding a pen and a reporter's notebook
Ben Baker

Dan Rather, eminent newsman and the voice of a generation, will visit the University at Albany this Friday, September 6 at 7:30 p.m. in the SEFCU Arena on the University at Albany Uptown Campus.

With a storied career that has spanned more than six decades, Dan Rather is one of the world’s best-known journalists. He has interviewed every president since Eisenhower and covered almost every important dateline around the world. Rather joined CBS News in 1962, and in 1981 he assumed the position of Anchor and Managing Editor of the" CBS Evening News," which he held for twenty-four years. His reporting helped turn "60 Minutes" into an institution, launched "48 Hours" as a newsmagazine program, and shaped countless specials and documentaries.

Upon leaving CBS, Rather created the Emmy Award–winning "Dan Rather Reports" on HDNet. He is founder, president, and CEO of News and Guts, an independent production company that specializes in high-quality nonfiction content across a range of traditional and digital channels.

Rather's recent New York Times bestseller, "What Unites Us: Reflections on Patriotism," offers a collection of original essays about the world we live in, what our core ideals have been and should be, and what it means to be an American.

Carl Kasell
CHIP SOMODEVILLA / GETTY IMAGES

Newscaster Carl Kasell, a signature voice of NPR who brought his gravitas to "Morning Edition" and later his wit to "Wait, Wait ... Don't Tell Me!" has died. He was 84. He fully retired in 2014.

Kasell's radio career spanned half a century. He was a newscaster for 30 years on "Morning Edition" until 2009. Kasell then became the official judge and scorekeeper of the Chicago-based show "Wait, Wait ... Don't Tell Me!" in 1998. He left his voice on hundreds of answering machines as part of that show's prize. We spoke with him in November of 2009 – when he’d decided to step down from doing morning newscasts at NPR.

Ron Darling is a New York Times bestselling author and Emmy Award-winning baseball analyst for TBS, the MLB Network, SNY, and WPIX-TV, and author of The Complete Game. He was a starting pitcher for the New York Mets from 1983 to 1991 and the first Mets pitcher to be awarded a Gold Glove.

In his new book, Game 7, 1986: Failure and Triumph in the Biggest Game of My Life, he looks back at what might have been a signature moment in his career, and reflects on the ways professional athletes must sometimes shoulder a personal disappointment as their teams find a way to win.

  NPR's oddly informative weekly hour-long news quiz program, Wait Wait…Don’t Tell Me! returns to Tanglewood in Lenox, MA on September 1.

The Peabody Award-winning series offers a fast-paced, irreverent look at the week's news, hosted by Peter Sagal along with judge and score-keeper Bill Kurtis. 

Bill Kurtis joins us. 

  In his new book of investigative reporting, Lights Out: A Cyberattack, A Nation Unprepared, Surviving the Aftermath, Ted Koppel reveals that a major cyber-attack on America’s power grid is not only possible but likely, that it would be devastating, and that the United States is shockingly unprepared.

It isn’t just a scenario. Koppel says a well-designed attack on just one of the nation’s three electric power grids could cripple much of our infrastructure—and in the age of cyber-warfare, a laptop has become the only necessary weapon.

  

  Life in the Mohawk Valley today is vastly different from generations ago. Long gone are the factory whistles calling workers to their shifts in old mill towns. Fort Plain still benefits from little-known inventor William Yerdon, and Utica baseball player George Burns was so skilled that fans called left field Burnsville.

Few realize that a local artist shared a special bond with John Philip Sousa, one of the nations greatest musicians. The Tamarack Playhouse was once the venue of spectacular theatricals, and as time goes on, there are fewer alumni to remember Amsterdams Bishop Scully High School.

Local author and local broadcasting legend Bob Cudmore shows that while lost, these and other compelling stories no longer need be forgotten.

  Norman Lear is a legendary broadcast pioneer, known for creating some of the most acclaimed and top-rated television series of all time. They include: All in the Family, Good Times, The Jeffersons, Maude, Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman, One Day at a Time, and Sanford & Son. He has just written a memoir called, Even This I Get To Experience.

  Simon Majumdar is a food writer, broadcaster, and author of Eat My Globe and Eating for Britain. He is a recurring judge on Iron Chef, The Next Iron Chef, and Cutthroat Kitchen. He is the fine living correspondent for AskMen.com and he writes regular features for the Food Network website.

He joins us to talk about about his new book, Fed, White, and Blue: Finding America with My Fork, an exploration into the food cultures that make up America—brewing beer, picking vegetables, working at a food bank, and even finding himself, very reluctantly, at a tailgate.

Ed Lucas

Dec 18, 2013

    For the last several weeks, we have had a terrific team of interns helping with the task of putting this and other WAMC programs on the air. Throughout the semester, you have heard from our other interns - Patrick Garrett and Josh Natoli. This morning you will hear from Blaise Bryant.

Blaise is a senior at the College of St. Rose in Albany and is a Communications major. He is also blind. With a lifelong interest in sports and sports broadcasting, Blaise speaks this morning with one of his heroes, Ed Lucas.

For nearly 55 years, journalist Ed Lucas has proven there are no true handicaps in life. Despite his dreams of making baseball's big leagues, Lucas lost his sight at the age of 12 after being hit in the face with a line-drive. While unable to play the game, he has been a presence in the New York sports scene for more than half a century as a reporter covering the Yankees and Mets.