body

Banner photo for "Broken in Still Beautiful" photo exhibition
Charise Isis

The Grace Project is an empowering photographic project by fine art photographer Charise Isis that captures the courage beauty and grace of those who have had mastectomy surgery as a result of breast cancer.

The very act of standing in front of a camera revealing their scars, allows each of her subjects a transformative experience, giving them permission to step into self acceptance and the opportunity to share the story of the scars that have been written on their body.

The ultimate goal of the Grace project is to photograph 800 portraits, the approximate number of new breast cancer diagnosis in the U.S. every day. Thus far, Charise has photographed well over 400 portraits towards this goal.

The Grace Project exhibition “Broken is Still Beautiful” will be on display at the Idea Garden in Kingston, New York on weekends this month. The opening reception is tomorrow evening.

The Concert, 1918–19. Oil on canvas, 29 3/4 x 36 1/2 in. Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto. Gift of Reuben Wells Leonard Estate, 1954, 53/27
Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Over the course of his long career, French painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir continually turned to the human figure for artistic inspiration. Renoir was born in 1841 and died a century ago in 1919. To observe the centenary of his death, the Clark Art Institute and the Kimbell Art Museum present the new exhibition, “Renoir: The Body, The Senses.” Include paintings, drawings, pastels, and sculptures by Renoir as well as works by his predecessors, contemporaries, and followers, the exhibition is on display at The Clark in Williamstown, Massachusetts through September 22.

“Renoir: The Body, The Senses” features works from The Clark’s collection and loans from all around the world. It was co-organized by Esther Bell, the Robert and Martha Berman Lipp Chief Curator at the Clark, and George T. M. Shackelford, Deputy Director at the Kimbell.

Esther Bell lead us through the exhibition.

Having an illness or a disability is stressful. It brings up lots of negative emotions such as fear, anger, sadness, and anxiety. It's easy to get caught up in, or commiserate around, these feelings. But study after study shows that stress is detrimental to the body and mind. Physically, it weakens the immune system and is connected to a host of illnesses. Mentally, stress breeds more stress, making it debilitating and contagious.

For someone living with a disease or disability, stress and negative energy can further compromise health and impact relationships with those most important – families, friends, and caretakers. Because of this, Beyond My Battle focuses on helping people with diseases and disabilities get to the root of their stress so they can better detect, manage, and reduce it.

Beyond My Battle is a not-for-profit organization founded by Martel Catalano and Nell Pritchard in 2016. “Beyond My Battle: Art with Heart & Hope” is an exhibition celebrating the healing power of art for those with illnesses, disabilities, and caretakers. The event will take place on May 9 from 6-9 p.m. at Spring Street Gallery in Saratoga Springs, New York.

Author Mara Altman's volatile and apprehensive relationship with her body has led her to wonder about a lot of stuff over the years. Like, who decided that women shouldn't have body hair? And how sweaty is too sweaty? These questions and others like them have led to the comforting and sometimes smelly revelations that constitute the new book, “Gross Anatomy: Dispatches from the Front (and Back.)”

The book is an examination of the female body, from the tip of the hairiest chin to the bottom of the, well, bottom. Mara mixes memoir with reporting to shed light on some of society’s most taboo topics. In her essay collection, Altman turns her unflinching gaze from the mirror to society at large, revealing what today’s beauty obsessions might say about oneself and the world.

While researching the toxic and addictive properties of sugar for his New York Times bestseller Fat Chance, Dr. Robert Lustig, a neuroendocrinologist at UCSF, made an alarming discovery - our pursuit of happiness is being subverted by a culture of addiction, depression, and chronic disease from which we may never recover.

In his new book, The Hacking of the American Mind: The Science Behind the Corporate Takeover of Our Bodies and Brains, Dr. Lustig presents the fundamental differences between pleasure and happiness – at the biological and chemical level—and explains the way big business is taking advantage of advances in neuroscience to confuse and conflate pleasure with happiness, and getting into our heads.

Dr. Robert Lustig is professor of pediatrics in the Division of Endocrinology and a member of the Institute for Health Policy Studies at University of California, San Francisco. 

It's happened to all of us: our cheeks flush red when we say the wrong thing, or our hearts skip a beat when a certain someone walks by. But few of us realize how much more dramatic and extreme our bodies' reactions to emotions can be. Many people who see their doctor have medically unexplained symptoms, and in the vast majority of these cases, a psychosomatic cause is suspected. And yet, the diagnosis of a psychosomatic disorder can make a patient feel dismissed as a hypochondriac, a faker, or just plain crazy.
 
In Is It All in Your Head?: True Stories of Imaginary Illness, Suzanne O'Sullivan, MD, takes us on a journey through the world of psychosomatic illness.

In the early evening on October 1, 2003, Christina Crosby was 3 miles into a 17 mile bicycle ride, intent on reaching her goal of 1000 miles for the riding season. She was a respected senior professor of English who had celebrated her 50th birthday a month before. As she crested a hill she caught a branch in the spoke of her bicycle which instantly pitched her to the pavement, her chin took the full force of the blow and her head snapped back. In that instant, she was paralyzed.

In her new book A Body Undone, Christina Crosby puts in words a broken body that seems beyond the reach of language and understanding. She writes about a body shot through with neurological pain disoriented in time and space, incapacitated by paralysis and deadened sensation.

wikipedia.org

Police say a body has been found in the Connecticut River, under a bridge connecting Holyoke to South Hadley.

  From skin to nerves to brain, the organization of the body’s touch circuits powerfully influences our lives—affecting everything from consumer choice to sexual intercourse, tool use to the origins of language, chronic pain to healing. Interpersonal touch is crucial to social bonding and individual development.

In Touch: The Science of Hand, Heart, and Mind, Johns Hopkins neuroscientist and bestselling author of The Compass of Pleasure, David Linden presents an engaging and fascinating examination of how the interface between our sense of touch and our emotional responses affects our social interactions as well as our general health and development.

    Playwright, author and activist Eve Ensler traces many paths of reconnection in her memoir, In the Body of the World.

It is the path of reconnection with her body, after she is diagnosed with cancer; with the people of the world, in the face of injustice and abuse; and with the earth.