bird

Dr. Lorin Lindner is the Clinical Psychologist for Clinica Sierra Vista Behavioral Health. She initiated the use of animals to treat trauma in Veterans at the VA Hospital in Los Angeles; the first program of its kind. She is the President of the Board of the Association for Parrot C.A.R.E. and of the Lockwood Animal Rescue Center.

Animal lover though she was, Lorin Lindner was definitely not looking for a pet. Then came Sammy – a mischievous and extremely loud bright pink Moluccan cockatoo who had been abandoned. It was love at first sight. But Sammy needed a companion. Enter Mango, lover of humans, inveterate thief of precious objects. Realizing that there were many parrots in need of new homes, Dr. Lindner eventually founded a sanctuary for them.

Meanwhile, she began to meet homeless veterans on the streets of Los Angeles. Before long she was a full time advocate for these former service members, who were often suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Ultimately, Dr. Lindner created a program for them, too.

Eventually the two parts of her life came together when she founded Serenity Park, a unique sanctuary on the grounds of the Greater Los Angeles Veterans Administration Healthcare Center. She had noticed that the veterans she treated as a clinical psychologist and the parrots she had taken in as a rescuer quickly formed bonds. Men and women who had been silent in therapy would share their stories and their feelings more easily with animals.

Linder's book is "Birds of a Feather: A True Story of Hope and the Healing Power of Animals."

Kirk Walla Johnson and Book cover "The Feather Thief
Marie-Josee Cantin Johnson

Kirk Wallace Johnson’s new book, “The Feather Thief: Beauty, Obsession and the Natural History Heist of the Century,” is a true story which explores the 2009 theft of rare Victorian-era bird feathers from a British museum by American music student Edwin Rist who was obsessed with using the feathers for exotic fishing lures.

Kirk W. Johnson's new book, "The Feather Thief," explores the 2009 theft of rare Victorian-era bird feathers from a British museum by American music student Edwin Rist, who was obsessed with using the feathers for exotic fishing lures.

Johnson joined us to discuss the book and his own obsession with Rist's story, which grew as Johnson tried to escape the pressures of his nonprofit The List Project.

Friends of the Washington County Grasslands IBA is a nonprofit land trust working to conserve critical habitat for New York’s endangered Short-eared Owls and other threatened and at risk grassland birds. 

On May 13th and 14th Friends of the IBA will host Winter Raptor Fest 2017 where attendees can see exciting live bird of prey programs and “free-flight” demos starring majestic raptors; learn about endangered Short-eared Owls, threatened Northern Harriers and many other owls, hawks and falcons; and meet the raptors up close in the Exhibitor Barn where you can take pictures and talk to the educators.

Here to tell us more are Director and Founder of Friends of the IBA, Laurie LaFond; Director of the Wildlife Institute of Eastern New York, Trish Marki; and Friend of the IBA board member and Raptor Fest organizer, Ron Renoni. 

  From the domestication of the bird nearly ten thousand years ago to its current status as our go-to meat, the history of this seemingly commonplace bird is anything but ordinary.

How did chicken achieve the culinary ubiquity it enjoys today? It’s hard to imagine, but there was a point in history, not terribly long ago, that individual people each consumed less than ten pounds of chicken per year. Today, those numbers are strikingly different: we consumer nearly twenty-five times as much chicken as our great-grandparents did.

Collectively, Americans devour 73.1 million pounds of chicken in a day, close to 8.6 billion birds per year. How did chicken rise from near-invisibility to being in seemingly "every pot," as per Herbert Hoover's famous promise?

Emelyn Rude explores this phenomenon in Tastes Like Chicken.

  You can discover how the lives of humans, red knots, and horseshoe crabs are intertwined when Deborah Cramer - environmental writer and visiting scholar at MIT - will discuss her new book The Narrow Edge: A Tiny Bird, an Ancient Crab, and an Epic Journey at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook on Friday night at 7 p.m.

In the book, and in her presentation, Cramer depicts an inspiring portrait of loss and resilience, the tenacity of birds, and the courage of the many people who keep red knots flying.

Dorrie Holmes / blogs.massaudubon.org

    

  The Flying Deer Nature Center in New Lebanon, NY has teamed up with Mass Audubon's Berkshire Sanctuaries for two presentations this week.

The first is Deep Nature Connection: An Evening Talk with Jon Young which will take place on Friday, April 24 at the Lenox Community Center. For 26 years, Jon has served as a mentor in the art of understanding bird and animal language, leading communities worldwide to recover these skills.

The second event is Song of the Forest, a one-day workshop for adults and kids at at Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary in Lenox, MA taking place on Sunday, April 26. Bird Language gives us insight into the subtle goings-on in nature—including right in our backyards.