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Ferrin Contemporary is presenting "Nature/Nurture," a group exhibition of twelve contemporary female artists invited to explore the influence of gender and its impact on their practice. The show was organized in honor of Women's History Month in conjunction with FOREFRONT2020, a symposium on women in the visual arts taking place on the MASS MoCA campus.

The exhibition explores these ideas that range from direct interpretations of the natural world to more abstract notions, such as the construction of gender and the endowed role of women within their personal and professional careers. Works in clay range in form from individual vessels to composed still lifes and figural and abstract sculpture.

Considering the impact that the #MeToo movement is having on all professions, artists were asked to pause and reflect on the role gender plays in their artistic practice and to consider the nurturing experiences that have shaped them. To tell us more, we welcome Senior Curator of Visual Arts at MASS MoCA Susan Cross, an artist featured in Ferrin Contemporary's "Nature/Nurture" group exhibition Anina Major, and director of Ferrin Contemporary and curator of Nature/Nurture Leslie Ferrin.

Chie Fueki, Super, 2004, acrylic, ink, graphite and glitter on paper on board, courtesy of Shoshana Wayne Gallery
tang.skidmore.edu

The Tang Teaching Museum at Skidmore College’s latest exhibition, "FLEX," opens tomorrow.

"FLEX" continues the Tang’s tradition of faculty-curated exhibitions. It brings together contemporary and historical art and material culture to consider how classical ideals, muscular physiques and heroic images intersect, and how muscled bodies represent changing notions of bravery, beauty, and health.

The exhibition will feature plaster casts of ancient sculptures juxtaposed with comic books, superhero figurines, bodybuilder photographs, and work by contemporary artists such as Nick Cave, Lucy Kim, Nancy Spero, and Andres Serrano.

Tonight in conjunction with the exhibition, the Tang’s Dunkerley Dialogue series features exhibiting artist Andres Serrano in conversation with Skidmore Professor of photography Robert ParkeHarrison.

We are joined by Ian Berry, the Dayton Director of the Tang, and two Skidmore College faculty members who co-curated "FLEX:" Dan Curley, of the Classics Department, and Gregory Spinner, of the Religious Studies Department.

The Opalka Gallery presents a 25-year survey of the work of JoAnne Carson in an exhibition entitled “JoAnne Carson: Rise Up and Shine!”

Carson’s work is on view in the gallery now and there will be an opening reception and artist talk on Friday, February 7.

Carson, who is a Professor of Studio Art and Graduate Director Art & Art History at UAlbany has established a unique artistic voice that merges references to the natural world with unexpected materials and colorful world-building.

She has received many awards including a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Louise Bourgeois Residency from Yaddo, and an artist grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

JoAnne Carson joins us along with the Director of The Opalka Gallery, Judie Gilmore.

Nocturne 4 Birdhouse - an all blue nighttime landscape painting
John Gordon Gauld

Unborn Sun: The Paintings of John Gordon Gauld” is on view in The Leonhardt Galleries at the Berkshire Botanical Garden in Stockbridge, Massachusetts through February 7 and there will be a "Meet the Artist" Gallery Presentation and Tea Service this Sunday, January 19 from 2 to 4 p.m. 

John Gordon Gauld graduated with a BFA with Honors from the Rhode Island School of Design and is the recent recipient of the Martha Boschen Porter Grant from the Berkshire Taconic Foundation to fund his future work.

Trenton Doyle Hancock and Frank Oz at MASS MoCA
Sarah LaDuke

It is the final two weeks to visit and inhabit artist Trenton Doyle Hancock’s world of characters seen in drawings, paintings, and installations at MASS MoCA in North Adams, Massachusetts. Hancock has transformed his childhood love of comic books, toys, and superhero culture into his own creation myth. That mythology and the multimedia iterations that it has sparked are on display in the exhibition "Mind of the Mound: Critical Mass." The exhibition is curated at MASS MoCA by Denise Markonish.

Hancock tells the story of the Mounds protected by Torpedo Boy, and their enemies, the Vegans. These narratives explore good and evil, authority, race, moral relativism, and religion, all while creating a truly unique body of visual art.

The Woodstock Film Festival will present the world premiere screening of "Parkland Rising," executive produced by Katie Couric and will.i.am, at the upcoming 20th anniversary film festival October 2-6.

The documentary, directed by two-time Emmy Award winner Cheryl Horner McDonough, follows the high-school students and families who became fierce leaders of the national movement for gun reform after the February 2018 shooting of 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High in Parkland, Florida.

On Friday, October 4 Manuel Oliver, father of Parkland victim Joaquin Oliver, will produce a mural in the center of Woodstock, New York that will combine psychedelic vibes, street art, and activism with a strong statement from Joaquin. Manuel Oliver joins us now.

Manuel and Patricia Oliver are the founders of Change the Ref, a foundation formed to empower our future leaders.

Philippe Petit has performed on the high wire more than 80 times around the world; he is also a magician, street juggler, visual artist, builder, lecturer, writer and subject of the Academy Award-winning documentary, "Man on Wire" and the feature film "The Walk."

Petit’s first “coup” was walking between the towers of Notre Dame in Paris in 1971. He followed with a walk between the pylons of the Sydney Harbor Bridge, setting the stage for “the artistic crime of the century,” his Twin Towers walk a quarter of a mile above the sidewalks of New York in 1974.

Joe Donahue will be talking with Petit on stage at the UAlbany Performing Arts Center’s Recital Hall on Thursday, October 3 at 7 p.m. discussing his creative inspiration, craft and career with a question and answer session with the audience will follow. It is part of the UAlbany’s Creative Life series.

Preceding The Creative Life event, Petit will perform a demonstration of his rope-walking artistry and join attendees at a reception at 6 p.m.

The exhibition “Ida O’Keeffe: Escaping Georgia’s Shadow” brings together thirty-five paintings, prints, and photographs exploring the artist’s mastery of color and composition as well as her complex relationship with her well-known sister, Georgia. The show will be on view at the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts through October 14.

Organized by the Dallas Museum of Art and curated by Sue Canterbury, The Pauline Gill Sullivan Associate Curator of American Art, the exhibition debuted in Dallas in 2018 and is the first ever solo museum exhibition of works by Ida Ten Eyck O’Keeffe and the most comprehensive survey of the artist’s work to date.

Robert Wiesenberger is the Associate Curator of Contemporary Projects at The Clark and he led us through the exhibition.

"True Colors: World Masters of Natural Dyes & Pigments" by color and trends consultant Keith Recker presents the work and vision of twenty-six natural dye artists from around the world, opening a window into their culture, their lives, and the power of color. The artist’s stories are organized by color and begin with white, traveling through the spectrum to blues, purples, reds, pinks, golds, arriving at varying hues of green.

Keith Recker is President and co-founder of HAND/EYE Fund, which publishes handeyemagazine.com, a multidisciplinary journal of global handmade creativity. He is also a board member and Creative Director of the International Folk Art Market.

"The Picture Book Odysseys of Peter Sís" is on display at The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art in Amherst, Massachusetts. It showcases more than 90 original illustrations from 26 picture books, ranging from Sís’s exquisitely detailed paintings of historical narratives to the bold graphics of his early readers. A selection of painted objects and public art projects showcase other facets of his award-winning career.

Born in Czechoslovakia, Peter Sís transports readers to the ancient city of Prague in "The Three Golden Keys" and explores its political past in "The Wall: Growing Up Behind the Iron Curtain." He chronicles his father’s two-year odyssey in the Himalaya Mountains in "Tibet Through the Red Box," and creates a modern-day fairytale in "Madlenka."

On the last weekend in July, nine local potters will open their studios and kilns to the public for the 13th annual Hilltown 6 Pottery Tour & Sale.

Visitors will meet potters and guest artists from around the country in the unique tucked-away settings of eight different Hilltown pottery studios. This year they will feature educational demonstrations at each venue where you can learn about this ancient yet contemporary craft as you climb inside a massive wood kiln and hear how it is fired or watch a master potter turn a hunk of clay into a beautiful pot.

To tell us more we welcome potters Christy Knox and Sam Taylor.

Acclaimed author Courtney Maum’s latest, "Costalegre," is the striking, heartbreaking and strange story of a privileged teenager who has everything a girl could wish for except for a mother who loves her back - heavily inspired by the real-life relationship between the heiress Peggy Guggenheim and her daughter.

The 2019 Open Studios of Washington County will feature 15 artists working across a range of mediums, including painting, photography, clay arts, and sculpture. Since the arts are vital to the cultural diversity and enrichment of the region, the event helps ensure the rich artistic tradition will continue.

The event now happens over four days and will run from July 19th through July 21st. Joining us to tell us all about it, we welcome Beth Moeller – an organizer of Open Studios of Washington County -and two of the featured artists, Leslie Peck and Rebecca Sparks.

The view from The Bell Tower at Olana - glasses less peaked windows in the foreground and a view of the Hudson River Valley below - a green landscape and an overcast sky
Sarah LaDuke

In Frederic Church’s Ombra: Architecture in Conversation with Nature” is a new exhibition on view at Olana State Historic Site in Hudson, New York. Hudson River School painter Frederic Church worked with Central Park architect Calvert Vaux to create Olana’s main house. Their design incorporated vast Hudson Valley views. A key space in Olana’s main house design is the “Ombra”, an outdoor room which is a transition zone between the central Court Hall and the surrounding landscape. In the new exhibition, several architects have paired with visual artists and other designers to develop their concepts and treatments regarding the indoor-outdoor spaces at Olana.

The exhibition is guest-curated by Barry Bergdoll, the Meyer Schapiro Professor of Art History at Columbia University and a curator in the Department of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Featured speakers from our visit to Olana, in addition to Barry Bergdoll: Senior Vice President and Landscape Curator at The Olana Partnership, Mark Prezorski; Jennifer Sage, one of the architects who created work for “In Frederic Church’s Ombra: Architecture in Conversation with Nature,” Sage and Coombe Architects is located in New York City and led by Jennifer Sage and Peter Coombe; and Stan Allen, an architect working in the Hudson River Valley and George Dutton ’27 Professor of Architecture at Princeton University.

“In Frederic Church’s Ombra: Architecture in Conversation with Nature” is on view through November 3, 2019.

The Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, MA is celebrating its 50th Anniversary this summer and for the occasion there is a special Anniversary exhibition, “Private Moments for the Masses,” which offers a behind-the-scenes look at the autobiographical aspects of Rockwell’s art through beloved imagery that conveyed, in both subtle and direct ways, his own interests, anxieties, and real-life experiences.

An astute visual storyteller and a masterful painter with a distinct, personal message to convey, Norman Rockwell created fictional realities that offered a compelling picture of the life that many Americans aspired to. His carefully-constructed artworks for the covers and pages of popular publications engaged an appreciative audience for decades; but few would have imagined all that his art revealed about the inner workings of his personal and professional life.

Laurie Norton Moffatt is the Director and CEO of The Norman Rockwell Museum.

The Thomas Cole National Historic Site in Catskill, New York has opened a new exhibition that, for the first time, explorers Cole's paintings of Catskill Creek.

"Thomas Cole’s Refrain: The Paintings of Catskill Creek" will run through November 3rd. Created during the 18-year period between 1827 and 1845, the artist's paintings of Catskill Creek constitute the most sustained sequence of landscape paintings he ever made. The views in the paintings were all anchored along one short stretch of Catskill Creek near the Village of Catskill.

To tell us more we welcome the Thomas Cole Site's curator, Kate Menconeri, and the exhibition's curator, H. Daniel Peck.

As a teenager, Mallory O’Meara was thrilled to discover that one of her favorite movies, "Creature from the Black Lagoon," featured a monster designed by a woman, Milicent Patrick. But for someone who should have been hailed as a pioneer in the genre, there was little information available. For, as O’Meara soon discovered, Patrick’s contribution had been claimed by a jealous male colleague, her career had been cut short and she soon after had disappeared from film history. No one even knew if she was still alive. As a young woman working in the horror film industry, O’Meara set out to right the wrong, and in the process discovered the full, fascinating story of an ambitious, artistic woman ahead of her time.

Mallory O'Meara's book is "The Lady from the Black Lagoon: Hollywood Monsters and the Lost Legacy of Milicent Patrick."

MASS MoCA clock tower sunset
Paul Gallo

MASS MoCA is holding holding a summerlong birthday celebration to mark its 20th year with performances, installations, and the return of the Solid Sound Festival.

Headlining the birthday bash on May 25 will be Annie Lennox in a sold-out gig. Capturing MASS MoCA’s energy and spirit of embracing music and art in all forms, the 20th birthday party spreads across the museum campus — from Marshall Street to the interior courtyards and galleries — encompassing new exhibitions, wild versions of your favorite games, terrific music by performers from both near and far, great food and a world of fun.

Star attractions for the rest of summer include Solid Sound, The Pretenders, Annie Lennox, Maggie Rogers and Laurie Anderson – just to name a few. We hear all about it now with Director of Communications Jodi Joseph and Director of Performing Arts Sue Killam.

Greenwich, New York native Jacob Houston has charmed audiences throughout the Northeast with his idyllic land and cityscapes and detailed glimpses into everyday life. With bright colors and enamel-like scenes, he romanticizes the places he travels, re-creating the world as he sees it: full of joy, wonder, and beauty.

Houston’s artwork has been exhibited throughout the region, at LARAC’s Lapham Gallery, Saratoga Arts Center, Washington County Farm Museum, Green Bridge Gallery, Historic Salem Courthouse, and Southern Vermont Arts Center. His reach extends into Vermont and Massachusetts and, increasingly, New York City.

His new exhibition, “A Magical World: The Art of Jacob Houston,” is on view through June 23rd a the Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, New York. We are joined by Jacob Houston, Claire Houston, and The Hyde’s Director of Curatorial Affairs and Programming Jonathan Canning.

Hudson Hall in Hudson, New York is presenting a reading and panel discussion to celebrate the publication of Hudson and Brooklyn-based artist and author Daniel Rothbart’s "Seeing Naples: Reports from the Shadow of Vesuvius."

The book of travel writing is inspired by Rothbart’s experiences as a Fulbright scholar in Naples during the early 1990’s, and combines personal narrative with stories from the city’s history, ancient and modern, that speak to Neapolitan values and culture.

Artists Joseph Mallord William Turner and John Constable rose to prominence as landscape painters in early nineteenth–century England. Their choices of subjects and the way in which they composed their views, together with innovative brushwork, helped elevate a traditionally overlooked genre.

The Clark’s exhibition “Turner and Constable: The Inhabited Landscape” features more than fifty oil paintings, watercolors, drawings, and prints and will be on view in Williamstown, Massachusetts through March 10. Curator Alexis Goodin leads us on a gallery tour.

Thumbnail images of artwork by Jean Shin
http://www.jeanshin.com/

Jean Shin, sculptor and public installation artist, was part of the University at Albany’s: The Creative Life: Conversation Series in the Fall of last year.

Shin is nationally recognized for her monumental installations that transform everyday objects into expressions of identity and community. For each project, she amasses vast collections of a particular object (prescription pill bottles, sports trophies, sweaters) which are often sourced through donations from individuals in a participating community. These intimate objects then become the materials for sculptures, videos and site-specific installations. Her work has been widely exhibited in over 150 major museums and cultural institutions.

The Creative Life series is a major arts initiative of the New York State Writers Institute, UAlbany Performing Arts Center and University Art Museum in conjunction with WAMC produced with major support from the University at Albany Foundation.

This conversation was recorded on November 1, 2018 at the University at Albany Performing Arts Center.

Bibbe Hansen, pop cultural icon, performance artist, musician, and actress known for her work with Andy Warhol was part of the University at Albany’s: The Creative Life: Conversation Series with me in the Fall of last year.

Born to the bohemian poet Audrey Ostin Hansen and Fluxus artist Al Hansen in 1952, she was introduced to Andy Warhol in 1964 when her father took her to the popular bohemian artist hangout, Stark’s coffee shop, in New York City.

She became the youngest of the Warhol Superstars at just 12-years old starring in his films Prison and Restaurant. She also sat for two Screen Tests for Warhol the following year.

The Creative Life series is a major arts initiative of the New York State Writers Institute, UAlbany Performing Arts Center and University Art Museum in conjunction with WAMC produced with major support from the University at Albany Foundation.

This conversation was recorded on September 5, 2018 at the University Art Museum on UAlbany’s Uptown campus. This semester’s Creative Life events will feature author Susan Orlean on March 1 and comedian and actor Paul Reiser on April 4.

Hudson Hall in Hudson, New York presents artist Maryna Bilak: CARE, an exhibition documenting the unseen process of caring for someone with Alzheimer’s — in this case, the artist’s mother-in-law, Dorothy.

Through charcoal drawings, fresco, sculpture, and painting, Bilak’s installation delves into the different roles that the act of caretaking requires from each person involved, including the patient herself. The exhibition opens with a reception with the artist on February 2 from 5 to 7 p.m. featuring a performance of an original song composed for the exhibition by Memphis-based pianist Michael Jaynes. The piece is inspired by Jaynes’ own experience caring for his mother, also an Alzheimer’s sufferer. Molly McCann, Associate Director of Programs and Services: Diversity and Inclusion Initiatives, at the Alzheimer's Association of Northeastern New York will also be speaking. 

We welcome artist Maryna Bilak and Molly McCann.

Renowned illustrator Gregory Manchess has created a lavishly painted novel about the son of a famed polar explorer searching for his stranded father, and a lost city buried under snow in an alternate future.

In "Above the Timberline," when it started to snow, it didn’t stop for 1,500 years. The Pole Shift that ancient climatologists talked about finally came, the topography was ripped apart and the weather of the world was changed—forever. Now the Earth is covered in snow, and to unknown depths in some places.

Original artworks from the book are currently on view at the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, MA through February 24th. Manchess has worked as a freelance illustrator for nearly forty years on advertising campaigns, magazines, and book covers.

Artist Jeffrey Gibson uses his art to reflect on his Choctaw and Cherokee heritage as a means of exploring the significance, traditions, and rituals of personal adornment and identity.

Gibson’s multidisciplinary practice encompasses a wide range of mediums and draws on a variety of influences and visual languages to comment on race, sexuality, religion, and gender, among other topical issues. He combines popular and queer culture with references to Native American history and current events.

His new exhibition, “This Is the Day” is on view at the Ruth and Elmer Wellin Museum of Art at Hamilton College in Clinton, New York through December 9.

Tracy Adler is The Johnson-Pote Director of The Wellin Museum and curator of this exhibition.

Frederic Edwin Church, a central figure in a group of artists known as the Hudson River School, became internationally renowned as a painter of monumental landscapes. The spectacular panoramas he painted in the 1840s through 1890s helped shape not only the cultural identity of the United States, but also of himself when he applied his vision as an artist to the house and 250-acre landscape that he named Olana, known today as Olana State Historic Site, a National Historic Landmark.

Olana’s designed landscape has been sensitively restored over the last ten years and can now be experienced by visitors very much as Church and his family experienced it in the 19th century. The new book: "Frederic Church’s Olana on the Hudson: Art Landscape Architecture," includes nearly fifty paintings and sketches by Church, alongside gorgeous photography by Larry Lederman and engaging essays by David Schuyler, Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, Stephen Hannock, and Thomas Woltz and Eleanor Jones Harvey who join us.

JOHAN PERSSON

  Under the watchful gaze of his young assistant, and the threatening presence of a new generation of artists, Mark Rothko takes on his greatest challenge yet: to create a definitive work for an extraordinary setting.

Based on the original Donmar Warehouse production, this new production of "Red" is the first ever UK revival since MGC Artistic Director Michael Grandage directed the premier in 2009. The production went on to win six Tony Awards including Best Play.

Award-winning stage and screen actor Alfred Molina reprises his critically acclaimed performance as the American abstract expressionist painter Mark Rothko. He is joined by rising star Alfred Enoch, of US television drama series "How to Get Away With Murder," as his assistant Ken.

"Red" will screen in cinemas on November 7, distributed by Trafalgar Releasing.

Vessels for Change is a collaborative art project to support Berkshire Immigrant Center. In October, over 60 Berkshire area artists joined their creative forces to make 100 hand-painted ceramic mugs in support of the Berkshire Immigrant Center.

The project culminates in a celebration at Bright Ideas Brewing on the MASS MoCA campus in North Adams, Massachusetts on Wednesday, November 14 at 6 p.m. 

We are joined by Director Berkshire Immigrant Center Brooke Mead, ceramic artist/potter and Vessels for Change organizer Stephanie Boyd, and artist, and Vessels for Change volunteer Laura Christensen.

**Please note: in the audio the date is misidentified as 11/15.

Jean Shin, sculptor and public installation artist, will visit the University at Albany for a conversation with WAMC’s Joe Donahue as part of The Creative Life: Conversation Series at 7 p.m. on Thursday, November 1 at the University at Albany Performing Arts Center.

The Creative Life series is a major arts initiative of the New York State Writers Institute, UAlbany Performing Arts Center and University Art Museum in conjunction with WAMC, produced with major support from the University at Albany Foundation.

Jean Shin is nationally recognized for her monumental installations that transform everyday objects into elegant expressions of identity and community. For each project, she amasses vast collections of a particular object—prescription pill bottles, sports trophies, sweaters—which are often sourced through donations from individuals in a participating community.

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