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  I’ll See You in Paris by Michelle Gable is based on the real life of Gladys Spencer-Churchill, the Duchess of Marlborough, a woman whose life was so rich and storied it could fill several books. Nearly a century after Gladys’s heyday, a young woman’s quest to understand the legendary Duchess takes her from a charming hamlet in the English countryside, to a dilapidated manse kept behind barbed wire, and ultimately, to Paris, where answers will be found at last. In the end, she not only solves the riddle of the Duchess but also uncovers the missing pieces in her own life.

  Elizabeth Brundage is the author of the novels A Stranger Like You, Somebody Else's Daughter, and The Doctor's Wife.

Her latest is All Things Cease to Appear, where late on winter afternoon in upstate, New York, George Clare comes home to find his wife murdered and their three-year-old daughter alone in her room across the hall. The novel is a complex portrait of a psychopath and a marriage.

  On Saturday, February 27th at The Clark in Williamstown, MA noted private collector Jon Landau, art dealer Andrew Butterfield, and former Clark Senior Curator Richard Rand discuss the collection of Renaissance and nineteenth-century painting and sculpture Landau has assembled over many years.

Using this private collection as an example, the three experts consider how collectors decide where to focus their attention, how changes in the art market have affected the practice of collecting, and related topics.

American music critic, manager, and record producer Jon Landau has managed Bruce Springsteen since 1977 and was a frequent contributor to Rolling Stone in the ’60s and ’70s.

  Few could explain, let alone seek out, a career in criticism. Yet what A.O. Scott shows in his new book: Better Living Through Criticism: How to Think About Art, Pleasure, Beauty, and Truth is that we are, in fact, all critics: because critical thinking informs almost every aspect of artistic creation, of civil action, of interpersonal life.

Drawing on the long tradition of criticism from Aristotle to Susan Sontag, Scott shows that criticism was and always will be the breath of fresh air that allows true creativity to thrive.

A.O. Scott joined The New York Times as a film critic in January 2000. Previously, he was a Sunday book reviewer for Newsday and a frequent contributor to Slate, The New York Review of Books, and many other publications.

  The Proctors' Key Private Bank Broadway Series has been unveiled. The season includes An American in Paris, The Sound of Music and Cabaret among six touring musicals. Capital Rep's slate of original productions will consist of five shows, from a tribute to Janis Joplin to an adaptation of Homer's Iliad.

In another first, an offering on Capital Rep's season, Beautiful — The Carole King Musical, will be presented at Proctors and will be a touring show, not an original production mounted by Capital Rep. Subscribers to either theater will have the option of adding tickets to the touring production of Wicked, returning to Proctors for two weeks in March 2017.

There is a lot going on and we welcome CEO Philip Morris to tell us more.

Nate Wooley At EMPAC

Feb 9, 2016

  Trumpeter Nate Wooley will be performing a new composition “For Kenneth Gaburo” on Feb. 12 at the the Curtis R. Priem Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center (EMPAC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (110 8th St., Troy). The show begins at 8 p.m.

Wooley is known for “extended” trumpet techniques that allow him to access a larger scope of sounds. For this project, he will be vocalizing texts written by Kenneth Gaburo through his instrument.

Nate Wooley joins us along with EMPAC’s Music Curator Argeo Ascani.

Illustration by ALEXIS BEAUCLAIR
Alexis Beauclair

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

This week we check in with the New York Council for the Humanities to learn about the practice and process of editorial illustration.

Alexandra Zsigmond is the art director of the New York Times Sunday Review, and we're going to speak with her about how politics and history are represented in editorial art. In addition to her work at the Times, Alexandra is one of the New York Council for the Humanities’ new Public Scholars.

Art Photograph - The Barn by Gregory Crewdson
Gregory Crewdson

  Photographer Gregory Crewdson’s career has spanned three decades. His work has been exhibited widely in the United States and Europe and is included in many public collections, including The Museum of Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Whitney Museum of American Art, The Brooklyn Museum, The Los Angeles County Museum and The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Crewdson’s newest body of work entitled, Cathedral of the Pines, will premiere at Gagosian Gallery in New York City this Thursday - January 28th.

Comprised of 31 digital pigment prints, this series was made during three productions in and around the rural town of Becket, Massachusetts. 

Early 2016 At MASS MoCA

Jan 13, 2016

  We feel very lucky to have MASS MoCA in our region and to have such a good relationship with the incredible visual and live arts presentation venue. 

MASS MoCA's Managing Director of Performing Arts,  Sue Killam, and Director of Communications, Jodi Joseph join us with a preview of upcoming exhibitions, concerts, residencies, and more.

Artist Danny Gregory says that you can carve out time for painting and drawing anytime at anytime in your day. He looks to show how making art even for just ten minutes can lead to a richer, more fulfilling life. Gregory’s artistic approach is through bite-sized and easily achievable exercises which he presents in his new book Art Before Breakfast: A Zillion Ways to be More Creative No Matter How Busy You Are.

  This unique coloring book features immersive aerial views of real cities from around the world alongside gorgeously illustrated, Inception-like architectural mandalas. Artist Steve McDonald's beautifully rendered and detailed line work offers bird's-eye perspectives of visually arresting global locales from New York, London, and Paris to Istanbul, Tokyo, and Melbourne, Rio, Amsterdam, and many more

Hudson State Park at Midnight
Paul Gallo

  There is a new Constellation in the night sky over the Hudson Highlands State Park.

On Pollepel Island about 1,000 feet off the shores of Beacon, NY and across the Hudson River from Storm King Mountain, the Bannerman Castle ruin - a property of the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation - has inspired Beacon-based artist, Melissa McGill, to create and install "Constellation" - a sculpture and light creation made up of 17 40-80 foot poles with a solar-powered LED light globe at the top of each. As the sun sets each night for the next two years, McGill's Constellation will fade-in over Bannerman - joining the natural stars in the sky.

The companion book Constellation accompanies the installation, both as an extension and artifact of the project. The book is a visual and literary dialogue between artist Melissa McGill and several celebrated writers and poets, using the artwork as a springboard for inspiration and collaboration. Melissa will do a book talk and signing at The Cold Spring General Store in Cold Spring, NY on November 13th.

Earlier this year we met Melissa McGill and Bannerman Castle Trust member Tom Johnson at The Cornwall Yacht Club and we visited the island where we spoke with Melissa about this special celestial sculpture.

  Video games have come a long way since Pong; the video game is an artistic medium all its own now. The current exhibition at The Opalka Gallery at Sage College From Concept to Console looks at art in video games, pulling back the curtain to reveal the process of how it is conceived and created. It’s an examination of the creativity, diversity, and wide range of artistry that spans many disciplines in a medium that is, in some ways, still in its infancy.

There is a curator tour at the gallery this Friday at 5:30 p.m. but we get to give you a little preview now. Curators Elizabeth Greenberg and Edward Ticson join us.

  The history of the Catskills is pivotal in the history of our country that is described in great detail in Stephen Silverman’s, The Catskills: Its History and How It Changed America.

Silverman’s book brings to life the beauty, vastness and turning points of the Catskills history, sharing stimulating stories of the region’s influential entrepreneurs, artists, gangsters, politicians, musicians and outcasts.

Vital to the development of America, the Catskills region was the birthplace of New York’s own Declaration of Independence, a central location for America’s industrial revolution, a rising resort town with hundreds of hotels and an artistic muse for the 19th century Hudson River School of Art and 20th century entertainers like Mel Brooks, Woody Allen, and Joan Rivers.

Audrey Flack

 Audrey Flack: Heroines is currently on view in the Hoopes Gallery at The Hyde Collection in Glens Fall, NY. This exhibition, organized by the Lafayette College Art Galleries in Easton, Pennsylvania, is on view at The Hyde January 3, 2016.

The show features artist Audrey Flack, a pioneer in Photorealism, and a nationally recognized painter, printmaker, and sculptor. The subjects of the drawings and prints on view highlight women neglected or demonized by history.

We are joined now by Erin Coe, Director of The Hyde, and Audrey Flack.

  Experimental performance artist, composer and musician, Laurie Anderson’s new film, Heart of a Dog, will screen twice as part of FilmColumbia this weekend and will begin a run at Time and Space Limited in Hudson on November 6th.

The film is a meditation on life, perception, and stories. It talks about the loss of a much beloved pet and a less beloved parent. 

In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we’ll learn about the Islamic State's rampant destruction of priceless antiquities and how we can support the efforts to stop these priceless pieces of heritage from being destroyed. We are joined Erin Thompon, Assistant Professor of Art Crime at John Jay College, City University of New York; one of the New York Council for the Humanities new Public Scholars; and America’s only full-time professor of art crime.

Folk Modern

Oct 22, 2015

  Since 1998, Albany International Airport has distinguished itself within the Northeast, and throughout the United States as a beacon for the arts in the Capital Region. The Art & Culture Program has become a cornerstone for showcasing the breadth and quality of the arts throughout the Region and has made the Airport a busy hub not only for travel, but also for celebrating and learning about local culture.

Farm To Canvas

Oct 21, 2015

  This Saturday, Brown’s Brewing and CiviCure will present Farm to Canvas. The goal of Farm to Canvas is to grow the audience for original artwork while supporting the restoration of Hoosick Falls’ Wood Block Opera House.

Since 1880, Wood Block has housed two extraordinary exhibition and performance spaces. CiviCure is leading the effort to restore these facilities to ensure the future of the arts in the community. The Farm to Canvas fundraiser will take place in tandem with a farm to table evening in the beautifully restored mill that houses Brown’s Brewing Company’s Walloomsac Brewery and Taproom in Hoosick Falls.

We are joined by Kelly Brown from Brown’s Brewing Co. and Barbara Sussman, Treasurer of CiviCure.

The University of California Berkley Philosophy professor, Alva Noë, is one for the foremost philosophers on consciousness and perception. In his book, Out Of Our Heads, Noë challeges the paradigm that consciousness that solely occurs within the confines of our brains. Now in his new book, Strange Tools: Art And Human Nature, he turns his focus on essential questions about art. 

  The 5th annual Made in the Berkshires Festival will take place at Berkshire Theatre Group venues this weekend – October 23rd through the 25th.

The festival features cutting-edge theatrical works (performed as staged readings), live music, film, short stories, and dance.

The co-curators of Made in the Berkshires are Hilary Deely and Barbara Sims.

The O+ Festival is a celebration of art and music that creates a bridge to access health care for artists. O+ fosters complete physical, mental and social well-being by connecting artists directly with a coalition of health care providers and health resources, in a shared vision to nurture the individual and the community.

Phyllis Kornfeld, the author of Cellblock Visions: Prison Art in America, will be giving a presentation next week in Stockbridge covering her 32 years of experience teaching art to incarcerated people. Unsatisfied with her work as an elementary, middle, high school and college instructor, Kornfeld began working in prisons in Oklahoma in 1983. She talked about her experiences with WAMC’s Berkshire Bureau Chief Jim Levulis.

  Here are some numbers for you: It is the 25th Anniversary of the Agricultural Stewardship Association and on October 10th, ASA will present their 14th Annual Landscapes for Landsake Art Sale & Exhibition.

The event is a fundraiser to support local farmland conservation, the show features thirty-one artists whose work is inspired by the region's working landscapes. It takes place in the historic barn at Maple Ridge in the hamlet of Coila, just west of the Village of Cambridge.

Teri Ptacek is Executive Director of the Agricultural Stewardship Association and Maple Ridge Owner Larry Sconzo both join us for the preview this morning.

James Wellman on Flickr

  The Springfield Museums, located in the heart of downtown Springfield, Massachusetts, is comprised of five world-class museums; the Michele & Donald D'Amour Museum of Fine Arts, the George Walter Vincent Smith Art Museum, the Springfield Science Museum, and the Lyman & Merrie Wood Museum of Springfield History.

The Museums Association is proud to be home to the Dr. Seuss National Memorial Sculpture Garden, a series of full–scale bronze sculptures of Dr. Seuss's whimsical creations, honoring the birthplace of Theodor Geisel, a.k.a. Dr. Seuss.

Heather Haskell - Director of the Springfield Art Museums and Collections joins us this morning to discuss highlights from two of those those museums – The George Walter Vincent Smith Art Museum and D’Amour Museum of Fine Arts.

  The exhibit - Monet to Matisse at the Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute in Utica features more than 60 paintings and pastel drawings from the renowned collection of the Dixon Gallery and Gardens in Memphis, Tennessee.

The exhibition includes landscapes, portraits, interiors, and still-lifes by leaders of French Impressionism. Monet to Matisse is an expansive view of nineteenth-century French painting and its influences. It is a story of artistic freedom and the shift from stilted academic historicism to near abstraction.

The exhibit runs through November 29th. Anna D'Ambrosio, Director of the MWPAI Museum of Art joins us.

www.anthampton.com

    

The “fourth wall” is the imaginary barrier that separates the actors from the audience in a traditional theater production. When it’s broken, the audience is shocked into an awareness of the role they play in supporting the spectacle at hand.

In British artist Ant Hampton’s new production, The Extra People, the fourth wall is so thin as to be nearly imperceptible, with the line between performer and audience equally unclear. The Extra People was commissioned by EMPAC and will premiere in the space where it was developed via the artist-in-residence program.

The piece will begin at 7 pm tomorrow and cycle on the half hour until 10 pm. Ant Hampton joins us to tell us more.

  For the fourth straight year, Basilica Hudson’ s Founders and Creative Directors Melissa Auf der Maur and Tony Stone are working in collaboration with Pitchfork Managing Editor Brandon Stosuy and Brian DeRan of Leg Up Management to program Basilica SoundScape.

Basilica SoundScape is a carefully curated weekend that’s been called “the anti­festival” for offering of a thoughtful mix of music, visual art, and literature.

SoundScape runs from September 11th through 13th at Basilica Hudson. Melissa Auf der Maur and Brandon Stosuy join us this morning to tell us more. In addition to his work on Basilica SoundScape - is Managing Editor at Pitchfork, a Music Curator for MoMA/PS1.

  Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1 (Portrait of the Artist's Mother) by James McNeill Whistler is one of the most renowned works of art by an American artist. It is considered by many to be the most important American painting not on American soil.

Better known as Whistler’s Mother, the painting has been owned by the French state since 1891 and is in the collection of the Musée d'Orsay in Paris. The Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts, presents the painting as the centerpiece of an exhibition on view at the Lunder Center at Stone Hill through September 27th.

Jay Clark, The Clark’s Manton Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs takes us on a tour of the exhibition.

Why We Dance

Aug 17, 2015

  Kimerer L. LaMothe is a dancer, philosopher, and scholar of religion.

She also loves to dance, every day, feeling it is vital for her wellbeing. And when she scans the landscape of human life, she sees dance everywhere—in the earliest human art, the oldest forms of culture, and in every culture around the world into the present.

But, she says, in the maps of and for human life that comprise the philosophy, theology, and religious studies of the modern west, dance occupies a surprisingly small space. So, she has explored that in her new book: Why We Dance.

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