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Alice Sheppard and Laurel Lawson perform Kinetic Light's DESCENT
Photography courtesy of MANCC and Robbie Sweeney

This Thursday and Friday night Kinetic Light, a collective made up of professional disabled artists Alice Sheppard, Laurel Lawson, and Michael Maag, will perform their dance piece “DESCENT” at EMPAC in Troy, New York.

Performing in wheelchairs, dancers Alice Sheppard and Laurel Lawson traverse a stage built with hills and curves in a telling of the story of Venus and Andromeda through dance, sound, lights, and projection.

Friday's evening's performance will stream live.

Vessels for Change is a collaborative art project to support Berkshire Immigrant Center. In October, over 60 Berkshire area artists joined their creative forces to make 100 hand-painted ceramic mugs in support of the Berkshire Immigrant Center.

The project culminates in a celebration at Bright Ideas Brewing on the MASS MoCA campus in North Adams, Massachusetts on Wednesday, November 14 at 6 p.m. 

We are joined by Director Berkshire Immigrant Center Brooke Mead, ceramic artist/potter and Vessels for Change organizer Stephanie Boyd, and artist, and Vessels for Change volunteer Laura Christensen.

**Please note: in the audio the date is misidentified as 11/15.

Jean Shin, sculptor and public installation artist, will visit the University at Albany for a conversation with WAMC’s Joe Donahue as part of The Creative Life: Conversation Series at 7 p.m. on Thursday, November 1 at the University at Albany Performing Arts Center.

The Creative Life series is a major arts initiative of the New York State Writers Institute, UAlbany Performing Arts Center and University Art Museum in conjunction with WAMC, produced with major support from the University at Albany Foundation.

Jean Shin is nationally recognized for her monumental installations that transform everyday objects into elegant expressions of identity and community. For each project, she amasses vast collections of a particular object—prescription pill bottles, sports trophies, sweaters—which are often sourced through donations from individuals in a participating community.

On November 4 and 10, respectively, The Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, New York will open two new exhibitions, “Ukiyo-e to Shin Hanga: Japanese Woodcuts from the Syracuse University Art Collection” and “Making History: The Nuremberg and Augsburg Chronicles.”

Jonathan Canning, director of curatorial affairs and programming at The Hyde, joins us to tell us about both exhibitions. 

The Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College is having a two-day 3-D Doings Symposium October 25-26 in conjunction with the acclaimed exhibition “3-D Doings: The Imagist Object in Chicago Art, 1964–1980.”

“3-D Doings,” which runs through January 6, is the first in-depth exploration of the little-known sculptural work and dimensional painting made by the Chicago Imagists during the early years of their practice. The symposium features a dialogue with Art Green and Flip Philips on October 25, and, on October 26, a gallery talk with artists Sarah Canright, Art Green, Mimi Gross, Lorri Gunn, Phil Hanson, Gladys Nilsson, and Suellen Rocca, a reception, and a panel discussion .

“3-D Doings” is organized by The Tang’s Ian Berry and Chicago-based curators and scholars John Corbett and Jim Dempsey. 

The great achievements of North America’s first artists are celebrated in the Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute exhibition “American Indian Art from Fenimore Art Museum: The Thaw Collection.”

The exhibition, on view through December 30, demonstrates the long-standing excellence of the aesthetic traditions of North America’s native peoples. Spanning the continent from the first millennium to the 20th century, the exhibition of more than 35 exceptional objects showcases masterpieces in various media: sculpture, painting, drawing, basketry, textiles, ceramics, and the decorative arts.

Mary Murray is the Department Head for Curatorial and Exhibitions and Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art.

Basilica Hudson’s biennial Pioneering People fundraiser celebrates groundbreaking artists across a range of disciplines by hosting and honoring a one-of-a-kind person in their raw industrial church. This year’s event – taking place Saturday, October 27 - will celebrate the achievements and legacy of musician, songwriter, actor, performer and cultural force Courtney Love.

Through conversations, readings, video, and performance, the evening’s program will shine a light on all of the ways that Love has influenced culture and inspired women and marginalized people for almost three decades.

Artist and author, Hudson Talbott, join us now to tell us about his new book, “Picturing America: Thomas Cole and the Birth of American Art.”

It is a fascinating look at artist Thomas Cole's life and takes young readers from his humble beginnings to his development of a new painting style that became America's first formal art movement: the Hudson River school of painting.

Hudson Talbott depicts the immigrant artist falling in love with, and fighting to preserve, his new country.

Talbott has written and illustrated more than 20 children’s books, including Newbery Honor winner “Show Way,” ALA Notable Book and VOYA Honor Book “Leonardo’s Horse” (by Jean Fritz), and “We're Back! A Dinosaur's Story,” which was adapted into an animated film by Steven Spielberg.

Exhibition photo: "Picturesque and Sublime: Thomas Cole’s Trans-Atlantic Inheritance" in Cole’s New Studio
Peter Aaron/OTTO / thomascole.org

The 2nd annual Hudson River Skywalk Arts Festival is on Sunday, September 30 at the Rip Van Winkle Bridge, the Thomas Cole National Historic Site, and Olana.

This is the 200th Anniversary of Thomas Cole's arrival in America, which is a pivotal moment for the birth of American art, as is reflected in the major exhibition of Cole's work, organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, which is now on view at the National Gallery, London. The Thomas Cole site also has two exhibitions on display “Picturesque and Sublime: Thomas Cole’s Trans-Atlantic Inheritance” and “SPECTRUM.”

To tell us more we welcome Betsy Jacks, Executive Director of the Thomas Cole National Historic Site in Catskill, and Kate Menconeri, Curator at the Cole Site.

SculptureNow’s 2018 outdoor exhibition of large-scale sculpture at The Mount in Lenox, MA is on view through October 31. SculptureNow offers free guided tours to the general public, students, and vision-impaired visitors and their exhibitions provide opportunities for sculptors to develop their careers.

This year SculptureNow celebrates its 20th year as a non-profit arts and education organization. There are 30 works on display in and around Edith Wharton’s historic home and gardens. There are two more artist guided tours of the exhibition before it ends at the end of October – this Sunday, September 16 and Sunday, October 14.

Ann Jon and Michael Thomas join us. Ann is the Executive Director or SculptureNow; Michael Thomas has work in the show.

Now in its seventh year, Basilica SoundScape is a weekend of music and art, taking place this year from Friday, September 14 to Sunday, September 16 at Basilica Hudson in Hudson, New York.

The festival is curated by Brandon Stosuy and Basilica Hudson co-founders Melissa Auf der Maur and Tony Stone. Chicago creative studio Varyer joins the event as co-presenters to provide creative direction. Headed by long-time visual and design director of SoundScape, and former Pitchfork Creative Director Mike Renaud, Varyer creates work inspired by and built around collaboration. SoundScape 2018 also features the talents of two guest collaborators, author Jenn Pelly and head of Sacred Bones Records Caleb Braaten.

Basilica SoundScape will feature a performance by Grouper, a reading by poet Hanif Abdurraqib , an orchestral piece composed by Sunn O)))'s [sun’s] Stephen O'Malley and performed by Bard College's 76-piece orchestra The Orchestra Now; performances by Lightning Bolt , a one-time collaboration between The Haxan Cloak and Yeah Yeah Yeahs’ Nick Zinner, and will feature a multidisciplinary bill of visual artists who will present immersive, large-scale, site-specific installations.

Melissa Auf der Maur joins us.

Sharon Bates’ has a new show at the Opalka Gallery – Exhibit B. Bates repurposes the detritus of material culture to create inventive, site-specific installations, mixed-media assemblages and drawings.

We welcome Sharon Bates and Opalka Gallery Director Judie Gilmore.

On August 11 the Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown, New York opened the exhibit "Seen & Unseen: Photographs by Imogen Cunningham." It is on view through October 14.

The photographs of Imogen Cunningham (1883-1976) reflect vital developments in 20th century art and photography. She is recognized for helping to establish photography as an art form. Never tied to one style of photography or subject, Cunningham had a signature view in what she created. Working for over seventy years, her photographs are seductive and dynamic and inspired by a multitude of sources.

Chris Rossi is Director of Exhibitions for The Fenimore Art Museum.

Frelinghuysen Morris House And Studio - Stairway
frelinghuysen.org

George L. K. Morris and Suzy Frelinghuysen, prolific abstract artists since the late 1930s, were a remarkable couple at the leading edge of the national and international art scene. Collectors and intellectuals, they created a Berkshire home that reflected their aesthetic worlds.

Upon her death in 1988, Suzy Frelinghuysen left instructions that the House & Studio and art collection be used for an educational purpose. The House & Studio opened for visitation in 1998.

Visitors can walk through the House with all of its original furnishings and view not only the works of Morris and Frelinghuysen on the walls, but walk right up to the works of some of their more famous colleagues and contemporaries including Picasso, Braque, Leger and Gris.

Kinney Frelinghuysen is the Director of the Frelinghuysen Morris House & Studio in Lenox, Mass.

The Clark Art Institute’s summer 2018 exhibition, “Women Artists in Paris, 1850–1900,” celebrates an international group of artists who overcame gender-based restrictions to make extraordinary creative strides, taking important steps in the fight for a more egalitarian art world. It is on view in Williamstown through September 3.

In addition to “Women Artists in Paris,” The Clark is the exclusive venue for the exhibition “The Art of Iron: Objects from the Musée Le Secq des Tournelles, Rouen, Normandy.” The exhibition presents thirty-six historic objects in an installation celebrating the craft and beauty of wrought iron. That exhibition is on view through September 16th.

(Left) Grille, Italian, 18th century. Wrought iron, polychromed, 33 7/8 x 25 5/8 x 1 5/8 in. Réunion des Musées Métropolitains, Rouen, Normandy, LS.4513 (Right) Circular Grille, French (Amiens), c. 1700. Wrought iron and rolled iron, cut and embossed, 39 3/8 diameter x 2 3/4 in. Réunion des Musées Métropolitains, Rouen, Normandy, LS.4231 Edit | Remove

On Sunday, August 5, The Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, New York opened complementary exhibitions: “Jane Peterson: At Home and Abroad” and “Changing the Landscape: Women Impressionists from the Thomas Clark Collection.”

Jane Peterson was a prominent early twentieth-century Impressionist. She traveled extensively and befriended the likes of Arthur Dow, Louis Comfort Tiffany, and Pablo Picasso. She experienced great success in her lifetime and was collected by John D. Rockefeller.

“Changing the Landscape: Women Impressionists from the Thomas Clark Collection” is drawn from local collector Thomas Clark’s extensive collection, and includes the works of more than fifteen female Impressionists from the late 1800s and early 1900s.

Women’s Equality Day is August 26th and The Hyde Collection will present a special event at 1 p.m.

We welcome Jonathan Canning and Jenny Hutchinson to tell us more. Jonathan is The Hyde’s Director of Curatorial Affairs and Programming and Jenny is a museum education.

Allen Gannett is the founder and CEO of TrackMaven, a software analytics firm whose clients have included Microsoft, Marriott, Saks Fifth Avenue, Home Depot, Aetna, Honda, and GE. He has been on the “30 Under 30” lists for both Inc. and Forbes.

In his book, "The Creative Curve," he overturns the mythology around creative genius, and reveals the science and secrets behind achieving breakout commercial success in any field.

We have been spoon-fed the notion that creativity is the province of genius; of those favored, brilliant few whose moments of insight arrive in unpredictable flashes of divine inspiration. And if we are not a genius, we might as well pack it in and give up. Either we have that gift, or we don’t. But Allen says that isn’t true.

Recent research has shown that there is a predictable science behind achieving commercial success in any creative endeavor, from writing a popular novel to starting up a successful company to creating an effective marketing campaign.

Maxfield Parrish (American, 1870-1966) The Lantern Bearers, 1908; N. C. Wyeth (American, 1882-1945) In the Crystal Depths, 1906; Norman Rockwell (American, 1894-1976) Girl at Mirror, c. 1954
www.nrm.org

This summer, the Norman Rockwell Museum is presenting the first comprehensive exhibition to look at the work of master illustrators Maxfield Parrish, N.C. Wyeth, and Norman Rockwell in relation to the history of Western art.

With more than 60 works by 25 American and European painters, along with more than 300 digital representations of some 50 other artists, "Keepers of the Flame: Parrish, Wyeth, Rockwell, and the Narrative Tradition" reveals the lineage connecting American illustration to some 500 years of European painting through the long line of teachers who have passed along their wisdom, knowledge, and techniques to generations of creators.

Organized by the Norman Rockwell Museum, the exhibition is on view through October 28. It is curated by Dennis Nolan, an award-winning artist and professor of illustration at Hartford Art School at the University of Hartford who joins us along with Norman Rockwell Museum Chief Curator Stephanie Plunkett.

Obie-Award winning performance group, The Secret City, will be making their annual return to Woodstock with the Secret City Art Revival, a weekend festival of site-specific performance, installation, community gathering, parade and artistic tent revival - Thursday, July 26th-Sunday, July 29th, 2018.

Guests for this summer’s revival include Amanda Palmer, puppeteer Paul Zaloom, troubadour Andru Bemis and more. The Secret City Art Revival invites locals and visitors to share in the special creative spirit and the extraordinary cultural legacy of Woodstock. The New York Times calls The Secret City, “Sort of a Salon, Sort of a Church...[it] has grown into a half-irreverent, half-earnest blend of revival meeting and group meditation session.”

Artistic Director and Revival creator Chris Wells; revival committee members: lead artist Nancy Deweir Geaney and Secret City Singer Jess Lunt join us.

North Adams, Massachusetts is celebrating baseball across the nation with "One Country, One Game: A Celebration of Baseball."  “Shades of Greatness” from the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in Kansas City anchors the exhibit, which also includes features on Berkshire County players like Hall of Famer Frank Grant and Jack Chesbro and memorabilia from Berkshire County teams through the years.

Dan Bosley is a lifelong baseball fan and was the president of the North Adams SteepleCats, a team in the New England Collegiate Baseball League for 7 years following 24 years in the Massachusetts State House. The North Adams SteepleCats have had over 120 former players drafted into professional baseball with nine making it to the Major Leagues.

Rebecca Makkai is the author of "The Borrower," "The Hundred-Year House," which won the Novel of the Year Award from the Chicago Writers Association, and "Music for Wartime." Her work has appeared in The Best American Short Stories, Harper's, and Tin House, among others.

In her new book, "The Great Believers," it's 1985, Yale Tishman, the development director for an art gallery in Chicago, is about to pull off an amazing coup, bringing in an extraordinary collection of 1920s paintings as a gift to the gallery. Yet as his career begins to flourish, the carnage of the AIDS epidemic grows around him. Thirty years later, Fiona is in Paris tracking down her estranged daughter who disappeared into a cult. While staying with an old friend, a famous photographer who documented the Chicago crisis, she finds herself finally grappling with the devastating ways AIDS affected her life and her relationship with her daughter. 

Frances Young Tang was a businesswoman, philanthropist, and 1961 Skidmore College graduate who died in 1992. In her memory, the Tang family made a substantial donation that led to the Tang Teaching Museum becoming a reality in 2000. Frances Day honors Frances Young Tang’s legacy of creativity and philanthropy with a day of free activities.

The museum’s fifth annual Frances Day, a community open house from 2 to 6 pm is on Saturday, July 14th. Visitors can experience multiple contemporary art exhibitions, art-making activities, tours, food, music, and more. Ian Berry is the Dayton director of The Tang.

Let us now travel to Cooperstown, NY where the Fenimore Art Museum’s new exhibit: “Thomas Cole and the Garden of Eden” is now on display. The exhibition centers on Cole’s masterwork “Expulsion from the Garden of Eden,” lent by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and explores his aspirations for landscape painting at the start of his career in the 1820s and early 1830s.

Sixteen original works, including paintings from the Fenimore’s collection and loans from more than a dozen other institutions and private collectors survey the themes of the Garden of Eden. The exhibition also reveals artists that influenced Cole early in his career, such as Asher B. Durand and Thomas Doughty.

Chris Rossi is the Director of Exhibitions at the Fenimore Art Museum.

brightly colored kimono - Symphony of Light: The Universe U/ Deep Space (1999) tie-dyeing, ink painting, embroidery and gold leaf on silk crepe (chirimen) with gold wefts 198x139 cm (IKMC-076)
mwpai.org

”Kimono! The Artistry of Itchiku Kubota,” a spectacular exhibition of 48 kimono, will be on view at the Museum of Art, Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute through September 16.

In this exhibition, kimono are presented as contemporary interpretations of traditional Japanese clothing. MWPAI is the exclusive United States venue for this exhibition, which is accompanied by an illustrated catalog.

“Kimono!” illuminates the immeasurable creative spirit of Itchiku Kubota (Japanese, 1917-2003) who began his textile training as an apprentice and studied numerous fabric-decorating techniques in addition to Japanese-style landscape painting and portraiture.

Anna Tobin D'Ambrosio is the President and CEO of the Museum of Art, Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute.

Each July and August the Williams College Museum of Art (WCMA) produces a public program series that offers a playful taste of the academic experience. This summer the series titled "Ologies" is digging into some of the quirkiest fields of study.

Also on WCMA’s summer agenda is the exhibition “Dance We Must: Treasures from Jacob’s Pillow, 1906-1940” which explores the contributions of Jacob's Pillow founder Ted Shawn and the iconic Ruth St. Denis to American modern dance.

Gathering over 350 materials, the exhibition contextualizes the pioneering work of Shawn and St. Denis within the scope of American art history through artifacts that have never been seen before.

Sally Taylor, daughter of James Taylor and Carly Simon, curates "Come to Your Senses" in MASS MoCA’s Kidspace gallery and art-making studio, which will include new music by both of her parents. A program of Taylor’s long-running "Consenses" project, "Come to Your Senses" asks visual artists, poets, dancers, musicians, perfumers, chefs, and sculptors to use one another’s art as a catalyst to create their own work.

At Kidspace, the initial works of art, through which all other works were inspired, were created by 5th grade students in North Adams and Northern Berkshire schools. Come to Your Senses is the capstone of Kidspace’s “Art 4 Change” project. An opening reception will be held on Saturday, June 23, at from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Kidspace.

To celebrate the opening of "Come to Your Senses," Sally Taylor will present an intimate one-night-only concert in The Hunter Center at MASS MoCA at 7 p.m.

This morning we learn about The Artful Mind Gallery in Lenox, Massachusettes which opened last month and showcases an enthusiastic and fine-tuned professional and passionate group of seventeen artists. The curator at large, Harryet Puritzman, is also the publisher of the well-known 26-year old magazine for the arts, The Artful Mind.

She now wants to give a gift back to artists whose work she’s admired and has been inspired by over the years.

The gallery includes the world of oils, acrylic, mixed media, photography, and sculpture - on view in the front window, throughout the interior space and in the back garden. Harryet Puritzman and Janet Pumphrey join us.

Ink bottles - one part of Kazumi Tanaka's "INK: The Color of Manitoga"
www.visitmanitoga.org

Manitoga is the house, studio, and 75-acre woodland garden of American industrial designer Russel Wright. Its Artist Residency program began in 2014. This summer’s residency project is entitled “INK: The Color of Manitoga” by artist Kazumi Tanaka. Tanaka is creating natural inks from plant specimens she collects in Manitoga’s woodland garden. Her lab and art space is in the main house at Manitoga.

Tanaka was born in Osaka, Japan and graduated from Osaka University before relocating to New York. She lives and works in Beacon, NY and her art has been shown all around the world. Manitoga’s Executive Director Allison Cross and Kazumia Tanaka join us.

Manitoga’s Member Opening Celebration and the official Artist Residency launch will take place tomorrow from 5 to 7 p.m. Information about that event and ongoing hikes and tours and other special events is available here.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

Today we are learning about the Albany Institute of History & Art’s Education and Interpretive programs. We are joined by Patrick Stenshorn, Director of Interpretive Programs and Aine Leader-Nagy, Director of Community Engagement.

David Lang
Peter Serling

Tonight at 7:30, EMPAC will present Pulitzer Prize-winning composer and Bang on a Can co-founder David Lang’s orchestral work, "darker." The evening-length composition will be performed by Ensemble Signal, with live projections by visual artist Suzanne Bocanegra.

David Lang is one of America's most performed composers. He is co-founder and co-artistic director of New York’s legendary music collective Bang on a Can. He is the recipient of numerous awards including the Pulitzer Prize, a Grammy Award, an Academy Award and Golden Globe nomination, a Bessie Award, Obie Award, and more.

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