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The view from The Bell Tower at Olana - glasses less peaked windows in the foreground and a view of the Hudson River Valley below - a green landscape and an overcast sky
Sarah LaDuke

In Frederic Church’s Ombra: Architecture in Conversation with Nature” is a new exhibition on view at Olana State Historic Site in Hudson, New York. Hudson River School painter Frederic Church worked with Central Park architect Calvert Vaux to create Olana’s main house. Their design incorporated vast Hudson Valley views. A key space in Olana’s main house design is the “Ombra”, an outdoor room which is a transition zone between the central Court Hall and the surrounding landscape. In the new exhibition, several architects have paired with visual artists and other designers to develop their concepts and treatments regarding the indoor-outdoor spaces at Olana.

The exhibition is guest-curated by Barry Bergdoll, the Meyer Schapiro Professor of Art History at Columbia University and a curator in the Department of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Featured speakers from our visit to Olana, in addition to Barry Bergdoll: Senior Vice President and Landscape Curator at The Olana Partnership, Mark Prezorski; Jennifer Sage, one of the architects who created work for “In Frederic Church’s Ombra: Architecture in Conversation with Nature,” Sage and Coombe Architects is located in New York City and led by Jennifer Sage and Peter Coombe; and Stan Allen, an architect working in the Hudson River Valley and George Dutton ’27 Professor of Architecture at Princeton University.

“In Frederic Church’s Ombra: Architecture in Conversation with Nature” is on view through November 3, 2019.

Andy at work on a large flower painting, the Factory, NYC, spring 1965
David McCabe / http://davidmccabephotography.com

In late 1964 Andy Warhol commissioned young fashion photographer David McCabe to document his daily activities for one year. During the course of this project, whenever the artist called McCabe would come to meet him at The Factory, an opening, a party, a coffee shop or any place where Warhol would decide that he wanted to be accompanied by the photographer and his camera.

In the end, these images were never published, perhaps because they revealed more than the increasingly-famous Warhol was willing to share with the public.

McCabe joins us to discuss an exhibition of his work at the Broderick Fine Art Gallery at Ruby's Hotel in Freehold, New York.

The Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, MA is celebrating its 50th Anniversary this summer and for the occasion there is a special Anniversary exhibition, “Private Moments for the Masses,” which offers a behind-the-scenes look at the autobiographical aspects of Rockwell’s art through beloved imagery that conveyed, in both subtle and direct ways, his own interests, anxieties, and real-life experiences.

An astute visual storyteller and a masterful painter with a distinct, personal message to convey, Norman Rockwell created fictional realities that offered a compelling picture of the life that many Americans aspired to. His carefully-constructed artworks for the covers and pages of popular publications engaged an appreciative audience for decades; but few would have imagined all that his art revealed about the inner workings of his personal and professional life.

Laurie Norton Moffatt is the Director and CEO of The Norman Rockwell Museum.

  Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: "Godzilla: King of the Monsters," "Booksmart"

Upcoming:

  • Art On Lark - Lark Street, Albany, Saturday 6/8, 11 AM-6 PM
  • Close Encounters With Music: Antoniv Dvorak & Josef Suk, featuring pianist Soyeon Kate Lee, violinists Irina Muresanu & Peter Zazofsky, violist Michael Strauss, cellist Yehuda Hanani - Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Mass., Saturday 6/8, 6 PM
  • The Sun Still Burns Here: Kate Wallich + The YC Perfume Genius - MASS MoCA, Hunter Center, Northampton, Mass., Saturday 6/8, 8 PM
  • Margaret Glaspy - Caffe Lena, Saratoga Springs, Saturday 6/8, 8 PM
  • Todd Rundgren: The Individualist - Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Mass., Sunday 6/9, 7 PM
  • Fishbone - Upstate Concert Hall, Clifton Park, Sunday 6/9, 8 PM
  • "Waitress" - Proctors, Mainstage, Schenectady, opens Tuesday 6/11 at 7:30 PM, through June 16

New movies: "The Secret Life of Pets 2," "Dark Phoenix," "All Is True," "The Tomorrow Man," "The Souvenir"

Frances Young Tang was a businesswoman, philanthropist, and 1961 Skidmore College graduate who died in 1992. In her memory, the Tang family made a substantial donation that led to the Tang Teaching Museum becoming a reality in 2000. Frances Day honors Frances Young Tang’s legacy of creativity and philanthropy with a day of free activities.

The museum’s sixth annual Frances Day is on Saturday, June 15. Visitors can experience multiple contemporary art exhibitions, art-making activities, tours, food, music, and more.

Dayton Director of The Tang, Ian Berry, joins us along with Elizabeth Streb, a MacArthur “genius” Fellowship recipient, acclaimed choreographer, and the founder of Streb Extreme Action. The company is known for physically demanding, gravity-defying performances that combine virtuosity, technical skill, and popular appeal. Streb Extreme Action is in residence at Skidmore and the subject of the exhibition at the Tang — Streb Action.

In 2017, MASS MoCA became the largest museum for contemporary art in the world, but just three decades before, its vast brick buildings were the abandoned remains of a shuttered factory.

Jennifer Trainer's new documentary film, “Museum Town” tells that story.

“Museum Town” shows how a small rural Massachusetts town went from economic collapse to art mecca. “Museum Town” will be the closing night film for this year’s Berkshire International Film Festival, screening at 7 p.m. on June 2 at The Mahaiwe in Great Barrington, Massachusetts.

An early and longtime director of development and public relations for MASS MoCA, Jennifer Trainer is now the President & CEO and Hancock Shaker Village. “Museum Town” is her first movie.

Joe Donahue and Annie Lennox at MASS MoCA
Jodi Joseph

Many people know Annie Lennox as the voice who has sold over 83 million records both as a solo artist and as one half of The Eurythmics, an Oscar and Grammy award winning artist and a tireless activist. Now, at Mass MoCA, she presents: "Annie Lennox: 'Now I Let You Go...,'" an exhibition comprised of hundreds of artifacts culled from her personal collection of memorabilia, found objects, and personal effects accrued throughout her lifetime and revealed within a large earthen mound.

The exhibition — part material diary, part art installation — is accompanied by a printed "field guide" in which Lennox annotates many of the objects on display; identifying the objects and adding recollections, personal stories, and provenance.

'Now I Let You Go…' opens June 1 at MASS MoCA as part of the museum’s 20th Anniversary celebration.

The Newburgh Illuminated Festival is an event designed to celebrate the diversity and dynamism of the city with a day of music, art, dance, poetry, food, and more. It brings people and families together to shine a light on the City of Newburgh to bring new people to the area, increased tourism, attract new businesses and have a positive effect on our regional perception.

The brainchild of Newburgh mayor Judy Kennedy, the event will be held this year on June 1 on Broadway near Liberty and Grand Streets from noon until 10pm. Four outdoor performance stages will be featured throughout the day along with the annual Colorfest, activities especially for children on the lawn of Washington Headquarters, musical guests at the Wherehouse, a dance and performing arts stage, a fashion show and much more.

To tell us more, we welcome Festival Board Chairman, Paul Ernenwein.

The Thomas Cole National Historic Site in Catskill, New York has opened a new exhibition that, for the first time, explorers Cole's paintings of Catskill Creek.

"Thomas Cole’s Refrain: The Paintings of Catskill Creek" will run through November 3rd. Created during the 18-year period between 1827 and 1845, the artist's paintings of Catskill Creek constitute the most sustained sequence of landscape paintings he ever made. The views in the paintings were all anchored along one short stretch of Catskill Creek near the Village of Catskill.

To tell us more we welcome the Thomas Cole Site's curator, Kate Menconeri, and the exhibition's curator, H. Daniel Peck.

Having an illness or a disability is stressful. It brings up lots of negative emotions such as fear, anger, sadness, and anxiety. It's easy to get caught up in, or commiserate around, these feelings. But study after study shows that stress is detrimental to the body and mind. Physically, it weakens the immune system and is connected to a host of illnesses. Mentally, stress breeds more stress, making it debilitating and contagious.

For someone living with a disease or disability, stress and negative energy can further compromise health and impact relationships with those most important – families, friends, and caretakers. Because of this, Beyond My Battle focuses on helping people with diseases and disabilities get to the root of their stress so they can better detect, manage, and reduce it.

Beyond My Battle is a not-for-profit organization founded by Martel Catalano and Nell Pritchard in 2016. “Beyond My Battle: Art with Heart & Hope” is an exhibition celebrating the healing power of art for those with illnesses, disabilities, and caretakers. The event will take place on May 9 from 6-9 p.m. at Spring Street Gallery in Saratoga Springs, New York.

  Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: "Avengers: Endgame"

Upcoming:

  • "Avenue Q" (Park Playhouse production) - Cohoes Music Hall, Cohoes, Thursday 5/2 at 8 PM through Sunday 5/5 at 2 PM
  • Hippo Campus - Upstate Concert Hall, Clifton Park, Friday 5/3, 8 PM
  • Albany Symphony Orchestra: "Star Wars & More, A Salute to John Williams" - Palace Theatre, Albany, Saturday 5/4, 7:30 PM
  • Lula Wiles - Caffe Lena, Saratoga Springs, Sunday 5/5, 7 PM
  • Ian Berg Subject:Matter - MASS MoCA, Club B10, North Adams, Mass., Saturday 5/4, 8 PM
  • Albany Pro Musica/Orchestra Pro Musica: Mozart Mass in C Minor, Ola Gjeilo World Premiere - Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Sunday 5/5, 3 PM
  • Maceo Parker - Massry Center for the Arts @ College of Saint Rose, Albany, Sunday 5/5, 7:30 PM
  • Brian Auger’s Oblivion Express - The Egg, Albany, Sunday 5/5, 7:30 PM
  • Caroline Rose - The Hollow Bar + Kitchen, Albany, Tuesday 5/7, 9 PM

New Movies: "Long Shot," "Intruder," "Ugly Dolls," "Sunset"

What if you had the chance to listen to living Holocaust survivors?

SageArts local songwriters and creative arts facilitators met with local survivors and their caregivers to compose songs and craft meaningful pieces of art – including masks, collages, prints and paintings – based on the themes that emerged from their conversations. This spring, they'll share these powerful pieces in an event that highlights the healing power of the arts.

“Honoring Holocaust Survivors: A Concert of Resilience and Hope” will be held on May 5th at 1:00 p.m. at Mount Saint Mary College in Newburgh. The entire Hudson Valley community is invited to join Jewish Family Service of Orange County in honoring survivors.

To tell us more we welcome: Elise Gold, Executive Director of Jewish Family Service of Orange County; Julie Last, Musical Director of SageArts; and Jude Roberts, Songwriter of SageArts.

MASS MoCA clock tower sunset
Paul Gallo

MASS MoCA is holding holding a summerlong birthday celebration to mark its 20th year with performances, installations, and the return of the Solid Sound Festival.

Headlining the birthday bash on May 25 will be Annie Lennox in a sold-out gig. Capturing MASS MoCA’s energy and spirit of embracing music and art in all forms, the 20th birthday party spreads across the museum campus — from Marshall Street to the interior courtyards and galleries — encompassing new exhibitions, wild versions of your favorite games, terrific music by performers from both near and far, great food and a world of fun.

Star attractions for the rest of summer include Solid Sound, The Pretenders, Annie Lennox, Maggie Rogers and Laurie Anderson – just to name a few. We hear all about it now with Director of Communications Jodi Joseph and Director of Performing Arts Sue Killam.

Greenwich, New York native Jacob Houston has charmed audiences throughout the Northeast with his idyllic land and cityscapes and detailed glimpses into everyday life. With bright colors and enamel-like scenes, he romanticizes the places he travels, re-creating the world as he sees it: full of joy, wonder, and beauty.

Houston’s artwork has been exhibited throughout the region, at LARAC’s Lapham Gallery, Saratoga Arts Center, Washington County Farm Museum, Green Bridge Gallery, Historic Salem Courthouse, and Southern Vermont Arts Center. His reach extends into Vermont and Massachusetts and, increasingly, New York City.

His new exhibition, “A Magical World: The Art of Jacob Houston,” is on view through June 23rd a the Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, New York. We are joined by Jacob Houston, Claire Houston, and The Hyde’s Director of Curatorial Affairs and Programming Jonathan Canning.

Earl Dotter

Renowned labor photojournalist, Earl Dotter, has photographed workers in various occupations for the last 50 years. His photos capture the humanity and nature of work in the US. He has documented the lives of coal mine workers in Appalachia, farmworkers, fishermen, nurses, 9-11 rescue workers, and some of the major events of the labor movement in U.S. history.

The exhibit "Life's Work: A Fifty Year Photographic Chronicle of Working in the U.S.A." will be shown at the LOB Concourse Level in the Legislative Office Building in Albany, New York from April 22 through the 26. 

We are joined by Earl Dotter, Northeast NY Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health Director, Matt London, and Outreach and Education Coordinator Rossana Coto-Batres. 

In conjunction with the exhibition “The Second Buddha: Master of Time,” the Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College presents “Bardo Now,” three evenings this week of special guests who use literature, art, and music to explore the Tibetan Buddhist concept of the bardo which is often understood as the intermediate space between death and rebirth.

We are joined by Ian Berry, the Dayton Director of the Tang Teaching Museum at Skidmore College, and Benjamin Bogin, the director of the Asian Studies Program at Skidmore College.

Founded in 2001, the Vassar Haiti Project engages students in a life-changing, experiential education in global citizenship, promotes Haitian art, and fosters sustainable development in Haiti. In addition to the purchase and sale of original Haitian art, VHP’s contributions are guided by six initiatives: education, healthcare, reforestation, clean water access, women’s empowerment, and art.

The Vassar Haiti Project’s 7th annual Art and Soul gala fundraiser will be held on Thursday, April 25, at the Vassar College Alumnae House.

This year, the Vassar Haiti Project honors Robert M. Morgenthau and Lucinda Franks for their extraordinary achievements in the fields of international social justice and literature.

We welcome Vassar Haiti Project Co-founders Andrew and Lila Meade along with Lucinda Franks.

For more than four decades, enormous advertisements displayed in New York City’s Grand Central Terminal affirmed a picturesque notion of everyday American life. The 18-foot-by-60-foot images depicted an idyllic nation: beautiful landscapes, holiday celebrations, world-changing historical events, family road trips, and patriotism.

"Colorama" is now on display at the Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, NY, examines the advertisements, offering insight into America, and the histories of advertising, photography, and technology. Thirty-six reproduced images from the George Eastman Museum depict an idealized past for a new generation, and a reintroduction for those who lived through the decades that helped shape photography. To tell us more: we welcome Director of Curatorial Affairs and Programming Jonathan Canning and Curator of Museum Education & Programming Jenny Hutchinson.

The Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College is now presenting the critically acclaimed exhibition “Like Sugar,” which explores the problematic and joyful aspects of sugar from multiple points of view to broaden our understanding of how the multi-layered substance affects us.

Tonight (Monday, March 4), in conjunction with the exhibition, the Tang’s Accelerator Series of talks on urgent issues is presenting “Food Futures—Food Justice, Sustainability, and Well-Being” with special guests Kate Daughdrill, an artist and urban farmer from Detroit; Anthony Hatch, a Wesleyan University professor whose book “Blood Sugar” critiques how scientists and drug companies use race and ethnicity; and Leah Penniman, a farmer, activist and author from Grafton, New York.

In the studio with us today to tell us all about the exhibition and tonight’s event are Ian Berry, the Dayton Director of the Tang Teaching Museum, and Rachel Seligman, the Malloy Curator and a co-organizer of the “Like Sugar” exhibition.

The Norman Rockwell Museum presents "The Art and Wit of Rube Goldberg," an exhibition exploring the humorous illustrations of the visionary artist, who has become famous for the creative inventions bearing his name. The exhibit opens tomorrow and runs through June 9th.

The exhibition will offer a revealing look at Goldberg’s creativity through original comic strips from the 1930s, where the artist created his complicated machines, as well as later political cartoons and instructional materials from the Famous Artists School, which are now part of the permanent collection of Norman Rockwell Museum.

Norman Rockwell Museum Curator of Exhibitions Jesse Kowalski, organized the exhibition and joins us this morning as does Steve Gerberich, a mechanical sculptor inspired by Goldberg, who will talk about his process at tomorrow’s opening, followed by a “make and take” art workshop, where he will lead participants in the creation of their own Rube Goldberg Machines.

Hudson Hall in Hudson, New York presents artist Maryna Bilak: CARE, an exhibition documenting the unseen process of caring for someone with Alzheimer’s — in this case, the artist’s mother-in-law, Dorothy.

Through charcoal drawings, fresco, sculpture, and painting, Bilak’s installation delves into the different roles that the act of caretaking requires from each person involved, including the patient herself. The exhibition opens with a reception with the artist on February 2 from 5 to 7 p.m. featuring a performance of an original song composed for the exhibition by Memphis-based pianist Michael Jaynes. The piece is inspired by Jaynes’ own experience caring for his mother, also an Alzheimer’s sufferer. Molly McCann, Associate Director of Programs and Services: Diversity and Inclusion Initiatives, at the Alzheimer's Association of Northeastern New York will also be speaking. 

We welcome artist Maryna Bilak and Molly McCann.

Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: "Shoplifters"

Upcoming:

  • Dar Williams - Cohoes Music Hall, Cohoes, Thursday 1/24, 8 PM
  • "Red Maple" (World Premier) - Capital Repertory Theatre, Albany, previews Friday 1/25-Sunday 1/27; opens Tuesday 1/29 at 7:30 PM, through February 17
  • Charles Ross’ One-Man Star Wars Trilogy - Proctors, Schenectady, Saturday 1/26 at 1:30 and 7:30 PM
  • Trio Valtorna - music of Harbison, Ravel, Brahms - Friends of Chamber Music, Kiggins Auditorium, Emma Willard School, Troy, Saturday 1/26, 7:30 PM
  • Lizz Wright - Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Troy, Saturday 1/26, 8 PM
  • Chandler Travis Three-O - The Ale House, Troy, Saturday 1/26, 8 PM
  • Triptych (Eyes of One On Another) - MASS MoCA, Hunter Center, North Adams, Mass., Saturday 1/26, 8 PM
  • Bindlestiff Cirkus Cabin Fever Cabaret (for Adults) - Helsinki Hudson, Hudson, Saturday 1/26, 9 PM
  • National Ballet Theatre of Odessa’s “Sleeping Beauty” - Palace Theatre, Albany, Tuesday 1/29, 7:30 PM

New movies: "Stan & Ollie," "The Kid Who Would Be King," "Serenity"

Celebrating its 17th season, Modfest 2019 is Vassar College’s annual exploration of the arts of the 20th and 21st centuries. This year’s theme “in motion” seeks to explore movement in its many forms. Events will take place January 31 to February 10.

This year’s festival marks the first time Modfest is moving off the Vassar campus – there will be an event in the newly-renovated Poughkeepsie Trolley Barn. Modfest 2019 features award-winning guest artists, faculty members, and students presenting music, visual art, dance, film, workshops, and lectures.

Modfest co-directors Christine Howlett and Tom Pacio join us. Christine is an Associate Professor, Director of Choral Activities, and Chair of the Music Department at Vassar College and Tom is the Interdisciplinary Arts Coordinator at Vassar College.

Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: “On The Basis of Sex”

Upcoming:

  • American Girl Live! - The Egg, Albany, Friday 1/18, 7 PM
  • Work O’ The Weavers - The Eighth Step at Proctors, Schenectady, Friday 1/18, 7:30 PM
  • Amanda Platt and the Honeycutters - Caffe Lena, Saratoga Springs, Friday 1/18, 8 PM
  • “The Matrix” - Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Mass., Saturday 1/19, 7 PM
  • Jerron “Blind Boy” Paxton - MASS MoCA Club B10, North Adams, Mass., Saturday 1/19, 8 PM
  • Elvis Birthday Bash with Mark Gamsjager & The Lustre Kings - Helsinki Hudson, Hudson, Saturday 1/19, 9 PM
  • Schenectady Symphony Orchestra with violinist Michael Emery - music of Tchaikovsky, Mendelssohn, Glazunov - Proctors, Schenectady, Sunday 1/20, 3 PM
  • Alabama: 50th Anniversary Tour - Times Union Center, Albany, Sunday 1/20, 7 PM
  • In Ply - Arts Center of the Capital Region, Troy, opens Tuesday 1/22, through April 5

New movies: “Glass,” “Shoplifters”

Kem Weber, a well-known mid-century architect, was part of the distinctive West Coast modernism movement that helped shaped the relaxed California lifestyle. He influenced California style during the mid-twentieth century with buildings architecture, interior designs and furniture, including his famed Air Line chair, which is part of many museum furniture collections.

As chief designer for the Walt Disney Studios in Burbank in 1939, Kem Weber also designed the specialized animation furniture that went into the then new studio complex. The Disney animation furniture, which has been lauded in recent years, was designed for specific animation disciplines with input from the artists that would be using it. It was all part of Walt Disney’s desire to create an efficient utopian campus for animated film production.

"Kem Weber: Mid-Century Furniture Designs for the Disney Studios" is a comprehensive overview of the Kem Weber designed Disney animation furniture that takes the reader on a journey from concept sketches and photos to interviews with legendary artists. David A. Bossert celebrates and details the form and function of this unique mid-century furniture and the impact it had on the Disney animation process over the decades. David A. Bossert is an award-winning artist, filmmaker, and author. He worked at The Walt Disney Company for more than 32-years and is now an independent producer, creative director, and writer.

Renowned illustrator Gregory Manchess has created a lavishly painted novel about the son of a famed polar explorer searching for his stranded father, and a lost city buried under snow in an alternate future.

In "Above the Timberline," when it started to snow, it didn’t stop for 1,500 years. The Pole Shift that ancient climatologists talked about finally came, the topography was ripped apart and the weather of the world was changed—forever. Now the Earth is covered in snow, and to unknown depths in some places.

Original artworks from the book are currently on view at the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, MA through February 24th. Manchess has worked as a freelance illustrator for nearly forty years on advertising campaigns, magazines, and book covers.

A Look Inside The Albany Barn

Dec 26, 2018
The Albany Barn at Arbor Hill's St. Joseph's Academy
Jesse King / WAMC

The Albany Barn is a community arts center and incubator in Albany’s Arbor Hill neighborhood. However, thanks to its low-income housing for emerging artists, it’s more than just an arts organization. 

Political, social and natural landscapes are all in peril. Fascism is on the rise, truth is dead, the planet is heating up. Is it really worth learning to love when the end of the world is nigh? And how do you make art, let alone a life, when one rogue tweet could end it all? These are questions all addressed in Olivia Laing’s new novel, “Crudo.”

Artist Jeffrey Gibson uses his art to reflect on his Choctaw and Cherokee heritage as a means of exploring the significance, traditions, and rituals of personal adornment and identity.

Gibson’s multidisciplinary practice encompasses a wide range of mediums and draws on a variety of influences and visual languages to comment on race, sexuality, religion, and gender, among other topical issues. He combines popular and queer culture with references to Native American history and current events.

His new exhibition, “This Is the Day” is on view at the Ruth and Elmer Wellin Museum of Art at Hamilton College in Clinton, New York through December 9.

Tracy Adler is The Johnson-Pote Director of The Wellin Museum and curator of this exhibition.

Frederic Edwin Church, a central figure in a group of artists known as the Hudson River School, became internationally renowned as a painter of monumental landscapes. The spectacular panoramas he painted in the 1840s through 1890s helped shape not only the cultural identity of the United States, but also of himself when he applied his vision as an artist to the house and 250-acre landscape that he named Olana, known today as Olana State Historic Site, a National Historic Landmark.

Olana’s designed landscape has been sensitively restored over the last ten years and can now be experienced by visitors very much as Church and his family experienced it in the 19th century. The new book: "Frederic Church’s Olana on the Hudson: Art Landscape Architecture," includes nearly fifty paintings and sketches by Church, alongside gorgeous photography by Larry Lederman and engaging essays by David Schuyler, Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, Stephen Hannock, and Thomas Woltz and Eleanor Jones Harvey who join us.

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