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army

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The U.S. Army Mountain Warfare School in Vermont is receiving $30 million for a new facility as part of the recently approved federal defense budget. 

Raised by powerful women in a restrictive, sheltered Christian community in New England, Ryan Dostie never imagined herself on the front lines of a war halfway around the world. But then a conversation with an Army recruiter in her high-school cafeteria changed the course of her life. Hired as a linguist, she quickly had to find a space for herself in the testosterone-filled world of the Army barracks, and had been holding her own until the unthinkable happened: she was raped by a fellow soldier.

Struggling with PTSD and commanders who didn’t trust her story, Dostie found herself fighting through the isolation of trauma amid the challenges of an unexpected war. Dostie tells her story in the new book, Formation: A Woman's Memoir of Stepping Out of Line.

Private First Class Bowe Bergdahl left his platoon's base in eastern Afghanistan in the early hours of June 30, 2009. Since that day, easy answers to the many questions surrounding his case: Why did he leave his post? What kinds of efforts were made to recover him from the Taliban? And why, facing a court martial, did he plead guilty to the serious charges against him? -- have proved elusive.

"American Cipher" is an account of the nearly decade-old Bergdahl tragedy, which, as journalist Michael Ames argues, is as illuminating an episode as we have as we seek the larger truths of how the United States lost its way in Afghanistan.

The book was researched with more than 20 hours of interviews with Bob and Jani Bergdahl, Bowe’s parents, who have not spoken to any media outlets since the political firestorm that followed their son’s recovery.

Nathaniel Philbrick, one of America’s pre-eminent historians, and the National Book Award-winning and New York Times bestselling author of In the Heart of the Sea, Bunker Hill, and Valiant Ambition, returns to the American Revolution, a subject he’s researched and written about for twenty years.

His new book, "In The Hurricane’s Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown," chronicles the remarkable year leading up to the siege of Yorktown, the battle that ultimately broke a years-long stalemate with the British and earned America her freedom.

"In The Hurricane’s Eye" also highlights Washington’s underappreciated naval cunning and his fraught relationship with French leaders.

Nelson DeMille's blistering new novel features an exciting new character—U.S. Army combat veteran Daniel “Mac” MacCormick, now a charter boat captain, who is about to set sail on his most dangerous cruise.

Daniel Graham MacCormick - Mac for short - seems to have a pretty good life. At age thirty-five he’s living in Key West, owner of a forty-two-foot charter fishing boat, The Maine. Mac served five years in the Army as an infantry officer with two tours in Afghanistan.

One day, Mac is sitting in the famous Green Parrot Bar in Key West, contemplating his life, and waiting for Carlos, a hotshot Miami lawyer heavily involved with anti-Castro groups. Carlos wants to hire Mac and The Maine for a ten-day fishing tournament to Cuba at the standard rate, but Mac suspects there is more to this and turns it down. The price then goes up to two million dollars, and Mac agrees to hear the deal, and meet Carlos’s clients—a beautiful Cuban-American woman named Sara Ortega, and a mysterious older Cuban exile, Eduardo Valazquez.

What Mac learns is that there is sixty million American dollars hidden in Cuba by Sara’s grandfather when he fled Castro’s revolution. Mac knows if he accepts this job, he’ll walk away rich…or not at all.

DeMille is a New York Times-bestselling author that has 15 best-selling novels, including Plum House and Night Fall. His newest novel is The Cuban Affair

Jeffrey Lent was born in Vermont and grew up there and in western New York State. He studied literature and psychology at Franconia College in New Hampshire and SUNY Purchase. His first novel, In the Fall, was a national bestseller. His other novels are Lost NationA Peculiar GraceAfter You've Gone, and A Slant of Light, which was a finalist for the New England Book Award and a Washington Post Best Book of 2015.

In his new novel, Before We Sleep, Katey Snow, seventeen, slips the pickup into neutral and rolls silently out of the driveway of her Vermont home, her parents, Oliver and Ruth, still asleep. She isn't so much running away as on a journey of discovery. She carries with her a packet of letters addressed to her mother from an old army buddy of her father's. She has only recently been told that Oliver, who she adores more than anyone, isn't her biological father. She hopes the letter's sender will have answers to her many questions.

  

Eric Fair, an Army veteran, worked in Iraq as a contract interrogator in 2004. His 2012 Pushcart Prize-winning essay “Consequence,” which was published first in Ploughshares and then in Harper’s Magazine, detailed some of his experiences. Fair expanded the essay into his 2016 book, also titled Consequence. Award-winning journalist and bestselling author Sebastian Junger referred to the memoir as “both an agonized confession and a chilling expose of one of the darkest interludes of the War on Terror.”

Eric Fair will read from his memoir Consequence at 8:00 p.m. on Thursday, April 20 in the Clark Auditorium, New York State Museum, Cultural Education Center in downtown Albany. Earlier that same day, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 375 of the Campus Center on UAlbany’s Uptown Campus the author will hold an informal seminar with audience discussion.  Free and open to the public, the events are cosponsored by the New York State Writers Institute and the Friends of the New York State Library. 

Memorial Day Listener Essay - Danny Nutly

May 22, 2015

  Dan New is a Vietnam Veteran and writer.

Daniel T. Nutly is memorialized on Panel 22E, Row 16 of the Vietnam Memorial in Washington, D. C.

4/21/14 Panel

Apr 21, 2014

    

  Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, newsman Ray Graf, and political consultant, Libby Post.

Topics include:
Afghan Runoff
Ukraine Fatal Clash
Boston Marathon
Sherpa Strike
Army Hairstyle Ban

A U.S. Army soldier from the Berkshire County town of Dalton was among three killed Tuesday in an attack in Afghanistan.

According to military officials 24-year old Army Spc. Mitchell Kirk Daehling was killed along with fellow soldiers Spc. William Joseph Gilbert and Sgt. 1st Class Jeffrey C. Baker. The soldiers were killed by an improvised explosive device.

Daehling was a 2006 graduate of Wahconah Regional High School. On the school’s website a statement reads in part, “Mitch was a true "Warrior" in every sense of the word.” The school’s mascot is the Warrior.

Ian Pickus

The New York Yankees are set to open their season against rival Boston today. But before turning their attention to a high-stakes season of adversity, the Bronx Bombers spent Saturday touring the facilities at West Point and holding an exhibition game against the Army cadets. The game rekindled an old tradition for the two storied programs.