archaeology

The ruins of Daniel Shays's fortified settlement reveal the hidden story of the famous rebellion. Shays and the Regulators founded the settlement deep in the Vermont wilderness after fleeing the uprising they led in 1787 in Massachusetts.

Rediscovered in 1997 and under study since 2013, these remnants divulge secrets of Shays's life that previously remained unknown, including his connection to Millard Filmore and the Anti-Federalist lawyer John Bay.

As the leader of the site's first formal study, Stephen Butz is here to tell us about the archaeological investigation, along with Shays's heroic life in the Continental army, his role in the infamous rebellion that bears his name and his influence on American law. His new book is: Shays' Settlement in Vermont: A Story of Revolt and Archaeology.

When archaeologists ventured into a thick Honduran rainforest in 2015, they were searching in an unexplored valley for the remnants of a long-lost city. Legend had it that an ancient metropolis was buried under centuries worth of jungle growth.

Best-selling author Douglas Preston went along on the expedition. The archaeologists Preston followed had the advantage of detailed survey maps to guide them to precise locations. Three years earlier, scientists had deployed advanced LIDAR (Light Imaging, Detection, And Ranging) technology to peer through the rainforest canopy to reveal a sprawling ancient metropolis.

Preston has detailed the experience in a new book The Lost City of the Monkey God: A True Story.

WAMC

The recent demolition of a building at the former Springfield Armory yielded significant discoveries by a team of UMass Amherst archaeologists.

The former Springfield Armory Building 104 held plenty of history. It was where 3.5 million M1 rifles were manufactured for use in World War II.  But kept safe and dry beneath the floor of the building was the evidence of activities dating back centuries.

Tom Crist

Earlier this summer, a group of students from Utica College and a few other schools spent three weeks at an ancient archeological site in southern Albania. It was the most recent group to take part in an unlikely collaboration between the college and a national park in a little known part of the world.

The Bering Strait is usually thought of as the migratory path whereby many of our ancestors found their way to America.

Dennis O'Rourke, professor of anthropology at the University of Utah, is hunting for clues that might indicate a people indigenous to this area.