american indian | WAMC

american indian

Book cover for "This Land Is Their Land"
Bloomsbury Publishing / Bloomsbury Publishing

David J. Silverman is a professor at George Washington University, where he specializes in Native American, Colonial American, and American racial history. He is the author of "Thundersticks," "Red Brethren," "Ninigret," and "Faith and Boundaries."

His new book, "This Land Is Their Land: The Wampanoag Indians, Plymouth Colony, and the Troubled History of Thanksgiving," reveals why some modern Native people hold a Day of Mourning on Thanksgiving, a holiday which celebrates a myth of colonialism and white proprietorship of the United States.

Artwork for "The Thanksgiving Play" presented by WAM Theatre
provided / provided

WAM Theatre will be presenting the second digital production of their re-imagined fall season beginning later this week, the wickedly funny satire "The Thanksgiving Play" by Larissa FastHorse, directed by Associate Artistic Director Talya Kingston. The production will be available online November 19-22.

The play is fast-paced satire where good intentions collide with absurd assumptions, as a troupe of white Liberal teaching artists scramble to devise a grade school theatre performance that somehow manages to celebrate Turkey Day, while also honoring Native American Heritage Month.

To tell us more, we welcome Director Talya Kingston and actress Molly Parker Myers.

The 2019 Kateri Peace Conference takes place Friday, August 16 and Saturday, August 17 at The National Kateri Tekakwitha Shrine in Fonda, New York. The 21st Annual conference is entitled “Defying Extinction - Nurturing a Garden of Resilience in the Face of Climate Crisis.”

For over 20 years the conference has met on the site of an historic Mohawk Village. This year’s conference will examine the painful existential threat of climate collapse and war.

The conference will feature presenters, educators, artists and special events.

We are joined by conference organizers John Amidon and Maureen Aumand and by one of the conferences presenters, Dahr Jamail, the author of “The End of Ice: Bearing Witness and Finding Meaning in the Path of Climate Disruption.” Jamail is also a Truthout staff reporter and has written numerous articles on climate disruption.

The received idea of Native American history as promulgated by books like Dee Brown's mega-bestselling 1970 "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" has been that American Indian history essentially ended with the 1890 massacre at Wounded Knee. Not only did one hundred fifty Sioux die at the hands of the U. S. Cavalry, the sense was, but Native civilization did as well.

Growing up Ojibwe on a reservation in Minnesota, training as an anthropologist, and researching Native life past and present for his nonfiction and novels, David Treuer has uncovered a different narrative.

Because they did not disappear -- and not despite but rather because of their intense struggles to preserve their language, their traditions, their families, and their very existence the story of American Indians since the end of the nineteenth century to the present is one of unprecedented resourcefulness and reinvention. His new book is "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" where David Treuer melds history with reportage and memoir.

Artist Jeffrey Gibson uses his art to reflect on his Choctaw and Cherokee heritage as a means of exploring the significance, traditions, and rituals of personal adornment and identity.

Gibson’s multidisciplinary practice encompasses a wide range of mediums and draws on a variety of influences and visual languages to comment on race, sexuality, religion, and gender, among other topical issues. He combines popular and queer culture with references to Native American history and current events.

His new exhibition, “This Is the Day” is on view at the Ruth and Elmer Wellin Museum of Art at Hamilton College in Clinton, New York through December 9.

Tracy Adler is The Johnson-Pote Director of The Wellin Museum and curator of this exhibition.

Frances Young Tang was a businesswoman, philanthropist, and 1961 Skidmore College graduate who died in 1992. In her memory, the Tang family made a substantial donation that led to the Tang Teaching Museum becoming a reality in 2000. Frances Day honors Frances Young Tang’s legacy of creativity and philanthropy with a day of free activities.

The museum’s fifth annual Frances Day, a community open house from 2 to 6 pm is on Saturday, July 14th. Visitors can experience multiple contemporary art exhibitions, art-making activities, tours, food, music, and more. Ian Berry is the Dayton director of The Tang.

In Anne Makepeace’s new documentary, two Native American judges reach back to traditional concepts of justice in order to reduce incarceration rates, foster greater safety for their communities, and create a more positive future for their youth. By addressing the root causes of crime, they are providing models of restorative justice that are working. Mainstream courts across the country are taking notice.

The film will screen at The Moviehouse in Millerton, NY on Sunday, March 26 at 11 a.m. The screening is presented by FilmWorks Forum.

Anne Makepeace has been a writer, producer, and director of award-winning independent films for more three decades. Tribal Justice, will premiere at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival in February 2017, and will culminate in a national PBS broadcast later this year.

We hear now, the story of two men.

Jim Thorpe: Super athlete, Olympic gold medalist, Native American

Pop Warner: Indomitable coach, football mastermind, Ivy League grad.

Before these men became legends, they met in 1907 at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania, where they forged one of the winningest teams in American football history. Called "the team that invented football," they took on the best opponents of their day, defeating much more privileged schools such as Harvard and the Army in a series of breathtakingly close calls, genius plays, and bone-crushing hard work.

Author Steve Sheinkin’s new book is: Undefeated: Jim Thorpe and the Carlisle Indian School Football Team - the story of a group of young men who came together at that school, the overwhelming obstacles they faced both on and off the field, and their absolute refusal to accept defeat.

There will be a launch party for the book on Sunday at Northshire Bookstore in Saratoga Springs at 5PM. 

The Iroquois Indian Museum in Howes Cave, NY is celebrating its 35th anniversary and has many exciting and educational events going on this season including: artist demonstrations, a fall exhibition, A Soldier's Heart a Sister's Hands: Haudenosaune [ho deh neh show nee] Women Veterans, Iroquois storytelling and the Iroquois Festival on Labor Day weekend.

They will be hosting a party on July 9th to celebrate 35 years with vendors, live music, children's activities, silent auction and more. 

Here to tell us more are Dr. Christina Hanks, Founding Director of the museum and Stephanie Shultes, Current Director.