Alexander Hamilton | WAMC

Alexander Hamilton

Lucas Willard / WAMC

As the smash-hit musical “Hamilton” continues its run at Proctors in Schenectady, the actors who portray three sisters of the prominent Schuyler family learned a bit more today about the real-life people they depict on stage.

Made famous by the Tony Award-winning “Hamilton: An American Musical,” the Schuyler sisters, Angelica, Elizabeth, and Margaret (Peggy), were fascinating characters in American history and played significant roles in the life of founding father Alexander Hamilton.

Now, for the first time, there is an exhibition at the Albany Institute of History and Art exploring the Revolutionary world of these women in the sisters’ hometown of Albany, New York. The exhibition, "The Schuyler Sisters & Their Circle" is on view through December 29 and looks at the lives of Angelica Schuyler Church, Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, and Margaret Schuyler Van Rensselaer through clothing, decorative arts, portraits, and manuscripts from the Revolutionary Period to the Federal Period.

Albany Institute of History and Art Curator Diane Shewchuk, Albany Institute of History and Art Director of Interpretive Programs Patrick Stenshorn, and Schuyler Mansion State Historic Site Manager Heidi Hill joined us.

It is 18 months after the signing of the Declaration of Independence, and some 12,000 members of America’s beleaguered Continental Army stagger into a small Pennsylvania encampment 23 miles northwest of British-occupied Philadelphia. The starving and half-naked force is reeling from a string of demoralizing defeats at the hands of King George III’s army, and are barely equipped to survive the coming winter. Their commander in chief, the focused and forceful George Washington, is at the lowest ebb of his military career. The Continental Congress is in exile and the American Revolution appears to be lost. Yet a spark remains.

"Valley Forge" is the story of how that metamorphosis occurred. Bob Drury and Tom Clavin, the team behind such bestsellers as "The Heart of Everything That Is," "The Last Stand of Fox Company," and "Halsey’s Typhoon," show us how this miracle was accomplished despite thousands of American soldiers succumbing to disease, starvation, and the elements.

Nathaniel Philbrick, one of America’s pre-eminent historians, and the National Book Award-winning and New York Times bestselling author of In the Heart of the Sea, Bunker Hill, and Valiant Ambition, returns to the American Revolution, a subject he’s researched and written about for twenty years.

His new book, "In The Hurricane’s Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown," chronicles the remarkable year leading up to the siege of Yorktown, the battle that ultimately broke a years-long stalemate with the British and earned America her freedom.

"In The Hurricane’s Eye" also highlights Washington’s underappreciated naval cunning and his fraught relationship with French leaders.

Strands of Washington's hair were found in an envelope tucked inside a leather book. Also inside: an 1804 letter to Philip Schuyler,  son of Union College co-founder Gen. Philip Schuyler
Union College

In olden times before cameras and voice recorders, friends and acquaintances often gave one another strands of hair as keepsakes.  Long ago, someone placed an envelope containing strands of our first president's hair in a leather book that has now surfaced at Union College in Schenectady.

An Alexander Hamilton item on display at Fort Ticonderoga through October 30, 2016
Fort Ticonderoga

Items belonging to Alexander Hamilton are now on display among the 18th century military exhibits at Fort Ticonderoga.

  By now, it’s pretty likely you’ve heard or read something about a little musical about a "ten-dollar Founding Father without a father" played or transcribed somewhere (everywhere).

Hamilton: An American Musical is ubiquitous and its reach far exceeds the confines of Broadway’s Richard Rodgers Theatre. The excitement created by Lin-Manuel Miranda’s masterwork bursts the fandom of the musical into a genuine interest in American History for many people.

So, if you were a museum in Albany, New York - a city where the Founding Father and first Treasury Secretary spent more than a little time -- what would you do?

If you answered put together a show about General George Washington's aide-de-camp and right-hand-man, you’d have had the same thought as The Albany Institute of History and Art.

A small exhibition exploring Alexander Hamilton’s time in Albany is currently on display. Curator, Diane Shewchuck, joins us to tell us more.

  Over the past three decades, Jane’s Ice Cream, founded by sisters Jane and Amy Keller, has grown from their humble beginnings as a street side lunch spot in Phoenicia, NY, into a regional ice cream powerhouse.

Jane’s Ice Cream supplies the Tri-state area, Massachusetts, and some of New York City’s toniest hotels and restaurants, including the New York Palace Hotel and the Carlyle Hotel.

This year they’ve even connected with the only thing currently more popular than ice cream – Hamilton: An American Musical.

Jane’s is run by husband and wife team Amy Keller and Bob Guidubaldi and they join us this morning.

The U.S. Treasury Department’s announcement this week that Harriet Tubman will replace Andrew Jackson on the $20 bill brought a sigh of relief on one central New York campus.

  In the summer of 1804, two of America's most eminent statesmen squared off, pistols raised, on a bluff along the Hudson River. That two such men would risk not only their lives but the stability of the young country they helped forge is almost beyond comprehension. Yet we know that it happened. The question is why.