Affordable Care Act | WAMC

Affordable Care Act

Three attorneys general, including those from New York and Massachusetts, held a press call Monday, to announce their lawsuit against the Trump Administration for rolling back protections under the Affordable Care Act.

A new report shows many working American families are spending more and more of their income on health care.

A new report shows suicide, alcohol, and drug overdose deaths have reached near-crisis levels nationwide, and states are struggling to cope. 

The Affordable Care Act remains a political battleground after a decade.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Representative Anthony Brindisi of New York’s 22nd district wraps up his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Jonathan M. Metzl is the Frederick B. Rentschler II professor of sociology and psychiatry at Vanderbilt University and director of its Center for Medicine, Health, and Society. He is the author of several books and a prominent expert on gun violence and mental illness.

Dr. Alan Chartock
Eric Korenman

WAMC's Dr. Alan Chartock discusses the renaming of multiple SUNY New Paltz buildings after Native Americans, and President Trump's plans for the southern border. He also comments on Tuesday's election of Lori Lightfoot as Chicago mayor, and reports that House Democrats will subpoena the Justice Department for the full Mueller report. 

4/2/19 Panel

Apr 2, 2019

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Former Times Union Associate Editor Mike Spain, The Empire Report’s J.P. Miller, Dean of International Studies at Bard College and Academic Director of the Bard Globalization and International Affairs program James Ketterer, and lobbyist and political consultant Libby Post.

Dr. Alan Chartock
Eric Korenman

WAMC's Dr. Alan Chartock discusses a Justice Department motion to invalidate the Affordable Care Act, and the department's plans to release the Mueller report in "weeks, not months." He also comments on President Trump's declaration of a national emergency, which still stands after a House vote failed to overturn the president's veto. 

Governor's press office

  

          Even though Massachusetts has its own universal health care law, the state could be severely affected by a federal judge’s finding that the Affordable Care Act is unconstitutional.

Dr. Alan Chartock
Eric Korenman

WAMC's Dr. Alan Chartock shares his thoughts on the bipartisan criminal justice bill that was passed by the U.S. Senate. Dr. Chartock also discusses the Affordable Care Act.

WAMC

   The open enrollment period has started for people looking to sign up for coverage through the Massachusetts Health Connector – the state’s online health insurance marketplace.

Governor Andrew Cuomo
Matt Ryan

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo says he has ordered his Department of Financial Services to reject requests by health insurance companies to raise rates in response to actions by the Trump administration to weaken the Affordable Care Act.

Rep. Peter Welch
photo provided

Is the Affordable Care Act built to last?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont Representative Peter Welch wraps up his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Even with Congress’s failure to officially repeal the Affordable Care Act, our healthcare system is desperately broken. No proposed reforms have addressed the fact that the cost of medical care in the U.S. has grown far beyond what most people can afford, and pharmaceutical giant CVS’s recent acquisition of Aetna only underscores what Americans have known for years: Our healthcare system is now in the money-making business and not the healing one.

As a Harvard-trained medical doctor and veteran journalist, first with the New York Times and now as editor-in-chief of Kaiser Health News, Dr. Elisabeth Rosenthal has witnessed firsthand how healthcare has become a business. Her new book is: "An American Sickness: How Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back."

The symbol of medicine, the caduceus.
WAMC File Photo

More New Yorkers than ever are signed up for health coverage under the state's health insurance marketplace.

Vermont Statehouse
Pat Bradley/WAMC

Vermont lawmakers say they may require all residents to have health insurance if the elimination of the individual mandate causes a significant number of people to drop their coverage.

https://www.mahealthconnector.org/

Massachusetts residents who want coverage starting January 1st must enroll in health insurance through the Obamacare marketplace by Saturday. Poor and immigrant populations are having the most trouble signing up.

WAMC

With ongoing efforts by the Trump administration to undermine the Affordable Care Act, the Massachusetts Health Connector has launched a campaign to promote the upcoming three-month open enrollment period.

A doctor's office
Flickr

The fallout continues from President Trump’s decision to end subsidies to health insurance companies to help lower income Americans pay for their health insurance. But it’s still unclear what the exact impact will be in New York.

401(K) 2013/Creative Commons

Vermont's top health care official says the decision by President Donald Trump to end subsidies that help thousands of Vermonters afford health insurance poses a long-term threat to their coverage.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo
Office of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo

The latest version of a plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act appears dead in Congress, but New York Governor Andrew Cuomo remains worried about a potential cut in federal funds to hospitals that he says will blow a hole in the state budget.

Ben Downing: Graham-Cassidy

Sep 26, 2017

On our national seal, you find a motto of the United States in Latin - “E pluribus Unum” … “Out of Many, One” … it was adopted to represent the coming together of the separate states to form the Union and the basis for our country. We are at our best as a nation when we look at that motto not as a description of the legal arrangement among states, but as the spirit that has guided us for 2 and a half centuries since. Out of many, one.

This is a picture of a hospital bed
wikipedia.org

New Yorkers who sign up for individual insurance under the Affordable Care Act exchanges will see their premiums rise by an average of 14 percent, now that the Cuomo Administration has approved rate increases for insurers in the exchanges. One reason for the increase is worry and uncertainty over the future of the ACA.

Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty
Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty

In the end, Republicans left the Affordable Care Act in place – for now.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty, a Democrat from the fifth district, continues her discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

wikipedia commons

New York state stands to lose nearly $1 billion if President Trump follows through with his threat to “let Obamacare fail” and cut key health care subsidies under the Affordable Care Act.

Rep. Peter Welch
photo provided

In a dramatic Senate vote, Republican efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, went down last Friday. Now, a bipartisan group of 40 House members have written to Speaker Paul Ryan proposing four reforms.   Vermont Democrat Peter Welch says the defeat of the Republican bill is providing an opportunity to refocus and bring lawmakers to the table for practical discussions on how to repair and improve the Affordable Care Act.

Republicans ran for years against the Affordable Care Act.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Rutgers University political science professor Ross Baker tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock why repealing it has proven so difficult.

This is a picture of a hospital bed
wikipedia.org

The future of the Affordable Care Act is uncertain in Washington, and there are several scenarios under consideration. The latest possible changes could impact New York’s relatively healthy health care system.

Governor Andrew Cuomo
Pat Bradley / WAMC

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, speaking Thursday at the opening of a health care center in Brooklyn for union members, defined the conflict over changing the health care laws in Washington as a class struggle.

Bipartisan group of Vermont leaders meet at Statehouse in Montpelier to decry federal health care bill
Pat Bradley/WAMC

The razor-thin survival of the GOP health care bill became dire Monday night when two Republican senators declared they would not support the legislation.  Earlier in the day a bipartisan group of Vermont leaders had gathered at the Statehouse to decry the measure and what they call potential negative impacts on the state.

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