Adirondacks | WAMC

Adirondacks

Adirondack Park sign
Pat Bradley/WAMC

The Common Ground Alliance is a collaborative bringing together diverse groups that advocate for various Adirondack issues.  For the first time the Alliance held a winter meeting to discuss progress since their summer forum and hear ideas about how to attract more full-time residents to the Adirondacks.

Adirondack Park sign
Pat Bradley/WAMC

A pilot reservation system is launching this spring for people who want to park at some trailheads leading to popular Adirondack High Peaks trails.

View of the Adirondacks from the Keene Valley area
Pat Bradley/WAMC

The New York state Department of Environmental Conservation is launching a pilot reservation system for parking access in one area of the Adirondacks this spring.

Main Street, Lake Placid, NY
Pat Bradley/WAMC

Upstate New York has seen a migration of sorts caused by the pandemic, with evidence of people moving north out of the New York City area, in search of more space, the great outdoors, and a lower cost of living. The Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism is a destination marketing firm based in Lake Placid. ROOST recently partnered with EDC Warren County on a survey to try understand the impact of new year-round residents in the Adirondack Region. 

View of the Adirondacks from the Keene Valley area
Pat Bradley/WAMC

With other recreation options limited due to the pandemic, the Adirondack Park has been experiencing a large number of visitors this summer despite the closure of the U.S.-Canada border. The Labor Day weekend was no exception as hikers and visitors flocked to the High Peaks and other areas of the 6-million acre park.

2020 State of the Park preview
Adirondack Council

The Adirondack Council publishes an annual report analyzing legislation and actions that have impacted the 6 million acre Adirondack Park over the past year. The organization has just released a preview of the upcoming State of the Park review, out next week. Council Executive Director Willie Janeway tells WAMC North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley it focuses on positive developments, and focuses on the park as a “A Landscape of Hope” to reflect its importance during the pandemic.

Leave No Trace principles poster
Pat Bradley/WAMC

A report from the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics is offering a number of recommendations to help reduce overcrowding on popular trails in the Adirondacks. One of the most controversial may be a suggestion to require permits in the High Peaks region.

Adirondack Park sign
Pat Bradley/WAMC

The Adirondack Common Ground Alliance is a diverse group representing advocates, educators, government and residents of the park.  It meets once a year to craft strategies to communicate key priorities for the Adirondacks in one voice.  This year’s forum was held virtually due to the pandemic and focused on the demographics of the Park.

A black bear
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

Campsites and lean-tos that were temporarily closed in some areas of the Adirondacks have been re-opened.

View of the Adirondacks from the Keene Valley area
Pat Bradley/WAMC

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has released an interim report with recommendations to deal with overuse of the High Peaks region of the Adirondacks.

View of the Adirondacks from the Keene Valley area
Pat Bradley/WAMC


Adirondack Park Agency sign in front of Ray Brook headquarters
Pat Bradley/WAMC

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has submitted a list of nominees to fill long empty seats on the Adirondack Park Agency board.

Adirondacks Elk Lake Dix Mountain
Pat Bradley/WAMC

Despite the coronavirus pandemic, hikers and visitors were out to enjoy the mountains, streams and trails of the Adirondacks this Memorial Day weekend.

"Politely Adirondack" poster series
Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism

As businesses in New York begin to reopen, an organization in the Adirondacks has launched a campaign to promote the region and pandemic safety.

With most businesses shuttered and unemployment claims rising, the North County Chamber coordinated a virtual town hall this morning with the leaders of four northern New York counties to discuss the response to and impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

View of Adirondacks from Lake Placid
Pat Bradley/WAMC

Michael Barrett was appointed executive director of the Adirondack Mountain Club in late September 2019, taking over for Neil Woodworth, who spent three decades leading the conservation and recreation group. Barrett is a Putnam County native who served as a foreign language interrogator for the U.S. Army and has worked in state government in New York and Missouri. 

August hikers in the Adirondacks crowd a trailhead (file)
Pat Bradley/WAMC

The New York state Department of Environmental Conservation wants to develop a plan to manage increased use of the Adirondack High Peaks region.

August hikers in the Adirondacks crowd a trailhead (file)
Pat Bradley/WAMC

Environmental advocates in the Adirondacks are calling on New York’s governor to commit $10 million to address overuse of the most popular sections of the six million acre park.

Trailhead at the Adirondack Loj
Pat Bradley/WAMC

The Adirondacks have been extremely popular for outdoor enthusiasts in the past few years, and overcrowding on some trails and the roads leading to them is a major concern.  The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has outlined additional plans to deal with traffic flow during what’s expected to be a very busy Columbus Day holiday.

State of the Park 2019-2020 cover
Photo by Nancie Battaglia / Adirondack Council

The Adirondack Council issues an annual report assessing the oversight by government agencies, localities and others of the 6 million acre Adirondack Park. This year’s just released State of the Park report, “Challenged By Success,” finds that the rising popularity of the region is also highlighting challenges.  Council Executive Director Willie Janeway and spokesman John Sheehan spoke about the report with WAMC’s North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley.  Janeway says the surge in the Adirondack’s popularity caught many by surprise and is spotlighting the need to better manage the Forest Preserve.

Henderson Lake, Adirondacks  (file)
Pat Bradley/WAMC

The Open Space Institute has announced that it will invest a million dollars in its property at the southern edge of the Adirondack High Peaks. The goal is to provide an alternative entry point and ease overcrowding on other popular trails.

Henderson Lake, Adirondacks  (file)
Pat Bradley/WAMC

A land preservation group plans to invest $1 million in its property near the Adirondack High Peaks to provide a southern access point for hikers.

Adirondack Park sign
Pat Bradley/WAMC

In early July, the New York Appellate Court issued a split decision on a lawsuit filed by Protect the Adirondacks in 2013 challenging the state’s plan to cut trees in the Forest Preserve in order to establish nearly 27 miles of snowmobile trails. Now, the state Department of Environmental Conservation and the Adirondack Park Agency have announced that the state is appealing the ruling.

Adirondack Park sign
Pat Bradley/WAMC

New York is appealing a court decision that has halted trail work in the Adirondacks.

Adirondack Loj trailhead register
Pat Bradley/WAMC

A new effort has been launched to educate hikers about overcrowding and how it impacts the Adirondacks. The Adirondack Mountain Club, the New York state Department of Environmental Conservation and the Colorado-based Center for Outdoor Ethics are partnering to educate hikers about “Leave No Trace” principles to help address overcrowding in the High Peaks region of the Adirondacks.  WAMC North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley was at the launch of the initiative.

The Adirondack Park is home to the largest protected natural area in the lower 48 states--six million acres including more than 10,000 lakes, 30,000 miles of rivers and streams, and thousands of miles of hiking trails running from mountain summits through a wide variety of habitats including wetlands and old-growth forests.

Carl Heilman has spent the last 40 years hiking and photographing his beloved Adirondack Mountains. He will tell us about his new book: "The Trails of the Adirondacks: Hiking America's Original Wilderness."

Heilman will be giving an illustrated lecture on Wednesday, August 7 at 7 p.m. at the Northshire Bookstore in Saratoga Springs. 

More than 200 years after Thomas Jefferson proclaimed Lake George to be the most beautiful water he ever saw, the Lake remains one of the clearest, cleanest lakes in the nation. But that doesn’t mean it’s without its challenges. In fact, invasive species; aging wastewater treatment plants and septic systems; stormwater runoff; and winter road salt all pose very real threats to the long-term health of the lake’s ecology and the Lake George Region’s economy.

The FUND for Lake George is dedicated to preventing these threats from devastating the lake. Guided by data from the world’s most advanced environmental monitoring system, The Jefferson Project, as well as additional FUND research, the not-for-profit organization is leading a multi-faceted, science-to-solutions effort to keep the 32-mile-long tourism mecca and drinking water source clear of harmful algal blooms and other threats, and providing a roadmap for other lakeside communities across the country.

Executive Director of The FUND for Lake George Eric Siy and CEO of Fort William Henry Corp. in Lake George and Chair of The FUND’s Council of Business Advisors Kathy Flacke Muncil join us to tell us more.

Adirondack Park sign
Pat Bradley/WAMC

Over 200 people will gather in Lake Placid Wednesday to discuss the Adirondacks.  This is the 13th year the Common Ground Alliance will bring stakeholders from across the park together to take collective action on park issues.

Adirondack Park sign
Pat Bradley/WAMC

In 2013, Protect the Adirondacks filed a lawsuit challenging the legality of New York state’s plan to cut trees in the Forest Preserve and build nearly 27 miles of snowmobile trails. The New York Appellate Court issued a split decision recently, ruling that while building the trails did not violate the state constitution, the planned destruction of timber did.

John Sheehan
Adirondack Council

The Adirondack Council is applauding the New York state Department of Environmental Conservation’s recent announcement that it will implement a regulation in early June that sets strict carbon dioxide emissions limits on coal-fired power plants operating in the state.  In this second part of our interview, Council Spokesman John Sheehan tells WAMC’s North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley they expect the state’s move will eliminate all coal-fired power generation in the state by the end of 2020.

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