Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program

White Spotted Pine Sawyer
Pat Bradley/WAMC

This is Invasive Species Awareness week in New York.  Coordinated through regional PRISMs — Partnerships for Regional Invasive Species Management — this year’s theme is “Early Detection: Explore, Observe, Report.” Recently, WAMC North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley sent a picture of an insect to Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program Director Brendan Quirion asking him if it was an invasive beetle.  It wasn’t. Quirion says a number of invasive species are near twins to native species — and that can make detection challenging.

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Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program

Invasive species are increasingly challenging communities and biologists as the plants and animals encroach on native species.  Plants and animals like the spotted lanternfly, giant hogweed and spiny waterflea can cost thousands, if not millions, of dollars to control once they encroach on an area. This coming week, New York will hold its sixth annual Invasive Species Awareness Week to help educate people about the problem. The effort is coordinated through regional PRISMs or Partnerships for Regional Invasive Species Management.  In northern New York, research and control efforts are coordinated by the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.  Director Brendan Quirion tells WAMC North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley awareness week is one of the most important statewide education and outreach events.

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Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program

The New York state legislature has been working to address a number of bills as the session winds to a close this week. Lawmakers recently passed a measure to extend an invasive species law. Advocates were hoping the measure would be made permanent, but say the year extension will give them time to craft a stronger law.

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Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program

New York’s annual Invasive Species Awareness Week begins on Sunday. This year, the focus is on what individuals can do to stop the spread of the plants and animals.

Draft plan cover page
courtesy NYS DEC

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has issued its draft invasive management plan. It includes eight objectives and new strategies to prevent or manage aquatic and terrestrial threats to the ecosystem.

Hydrilla removed from watercraft
Jake Sporn

Boat stewards recently intercepted a vessel that had a fast-growing aquatic invasive species attached and prevented its incursion into an Adirondack lake.  While officials applaud the successful detection, the interception is also underscoring the need for more resources to prevent the spread of invasives across the region.

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Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program

Invasive species are non-native plants and animals that enter and harm an ecosystem.  Invasive Species Awareness Week in New York state kicks off Sunday.  It’s a time when experts work with the public to increase awareness of the problem and how to prevent its spread.

Invasive steward sign
Pat Bradley/WAMC

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation this summer is expanding its stewardship partnership aimed at preventing the spread of aquatic invasive species in the Adirondacks.

Hundreds of adult spiny waterfleas clumped together on fishing line.
Emily DeBolt / Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program

It’s a small creature about the width of your pinky, averaging 1/4 to 5/8 of an inch long.  But it has the potential to wreak havoc in the region’s lakes.  The spiny waterflea began spreading into Adirondack lakes in 2008 and was confirmed in Lake Champlain in 2014.  This month, an angler found the invasive zooplankton while fishing in what was considered to be the largest invasive-free lake in the Adirondacks.

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program

One of the individuals who has led efforts to combat invasive species in New York is leaving to take a position at the Department of Interior. Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program Director Hilary Smith will become the federal agency’s invasive species coordinator. She spoke with WAMC’s North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley about her decision to leave the Adirondacks.

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program

The head of the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program is leaving to take a high-level job at the Department of the Interior.

Emily DeBolt/Lake George Association

New regulations have gone into effect in New York State requiring boats at DEC boat launches be clear of any plant or animal matter before entering the water. As those rules go into effect, legislation is pending in Albany that would make such “clean, drain and dry” regulations applicable at all boat launches.

Emily DeBolt/Lake George Association

Groups working to control the spread of aquatic invasive species in New York and Vermont are planning training sessions to identify the animals in hopes of protecting the region’s waters.

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program

Two organizations in the region have received national awards for their work to control and prevent the spread of invasive species.