1990s | WAMC

1990s

Book cover for "Singular Sensation"
Simon & Schuster / Simon & Schuster

We welcome New York Post theater columnist Michael Riedel to the Roundtable this morning with the publication of his second book, Singular Sensation: The Triumph of Broadway.


With over 150 insider interviews, Singular Sensation portrays the people, money, and power that created the blockbuster shows and aesthetic spectacle that has dominated not only a couple of acres of real estate in the heart of Manhattan but has also captured the hearts and minds of millions of people around the world.

Michael Riedel has been the theater columnist for the New York Post since 1998. Michael’s first book, Razzle Dazzle: The Battle for Broadway was a New York Times bestseller.

Twenty-five years after its first season aired, "Friends" remains incredibly popular. If it were counted in the Nielsen ratings as a new show, it would rank at #9. Even after all this time, the "Friends" phenomenon continues to grow and evolve, attracting a new generation of younger fans, who weren’t alive when the show premiered.

For the twenty-fifth anniversary of the pilot episode, in his new book, "Generation Friends: An Inside Look at the Show That Defined a Television Era," pop culture writer and NYU professor of writing and comedy history Saul Austerlitz shares a nostalgic, fascinating look at how the show was created, cast, and filmed, analyzing the best episodes, plot points, and themes; and provides insight into why the show that defined 1990s television has a popularity and legacy that has endured beyond anyone’s wildest expectations.

Book cover for "Passage" and photo of Khary Lazarre-White
Author photo by Emmanuel Andre

Khary Lazarre-White, author, activist and attorney, is the executive director and cofounder of The Brotherhood/Sister Sol (Bro/Sis), a nationally renowned, Harlem-based youth services organization.

His first novel, "Passage," is the story of Warrior, a young man navigating the snowy winter streets of Harlem and Brooklyn in 1993. Warrior is surrounded by deep family love and a sustaining connection to his history, bonds that arm him as he confronts the urban forces that surround him--both supernatural and human including some that seek his very destruction.

He will be in Albany, New York for a pair of New York State Writers Institute events with Reif Larsen on Thursday, April 11.

Following sold-out runs in Los Angeles and a critically acclaimed, sold-out run in New York City, the new musical "Cruel Intentions: The ’90s Musical" (a stage adaptation of Roger Kumble’s 1999 cult-hit film, created by Jordan Ross, Lindsey Rosin and Roger Kumble) will launch its first national tour at Proctors in Schenectady, New York on March 29. The production will play over 18 cities this Spring.

Producer Eva Price joins us to tell us more.

In 1991, Thelma & Louise, the story of two outlaw women on the run from their disenchanted lives, was a revelation. Finally, here was a film in which women were, in every sense, behind the wheel. It turned the tables on Hollywood, instantly becoming a classic.

Becky Aikman’s new book "Off the Cliff: How the Making of Thelma & Louise Drove Hollywood to the Edge," offers a rousing behind-the-scenes look at the filmmaking process as well as the vivid personalities behind the creation of a cinematic masterpiece.

Becky Aikman is the author of the memoir "Saturday Night Widows: The Adventures of Six Friends Remaking Their Lives." She was a journalist at Newsday, and her work has also appeared in the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times.

  As a performer, songwriter and producer, Richard Marx’s nearly three-decade-long career has had innumerable highlights. The Chicago native has sold more than 30 million albums worldwide. To this day, he is the only male artist in history to have his first seven singles reach the Top 5 on the Billboard charts.

He will perform at The Colonial in Pittsfield, MA this Friday, presented by The Berkshire Theatre Group.

    The Breakfast Club defined an entire generation of pop culture and included such talent as Molly Ringwald “the princess,” Anthony Michael Hall “the brain,” Emilio Estevez “the jock,” Judd Nelson “the criminal,” and Ally Sheedy “the basket-case.”

It is likely the late John Hughes most-loved film and it's receiving a cinema re-release from Fathom Events tomorrow night and next Tuesday, March 31st. To commemorate the anniversary, we spoke with Kirk Honeycutt about his book, John Hughes: A Life in Film.  

Honeycutt is the former chief film critic for The Hollywood Reporter for many years and subsequent to that, senior film reporter for that publication. Honeycutt is a member of the prestigious Los Angeles Film Critics Association, and is the creator of Honeycutt's Hollywood, a popular film review website.