1970s

In his new book, "Operation Chaos: The Vietnam Deserters Who Fought the CIA, The Brainwashers, and Themselves," journalist Matthew Sweet explores the story of a specific group of young Americans who deserted and got more than they bargained for.

In Sweet’s telling - CIA agents and their allies successfully infiltrated the deserters in hopes of fomenting discord, setting off a vicious cycle of internal scrutiny and paranoia marked by interrogations and allegations of brainwashing.

Sweet says that almost 50 years later, some of these same Americans are still dealing with associated trauma.

In his new memoir, "20th Century Boy," celebrated New York City painter, Duncan Hannah gives a rollicking and vividly immediate account of his life amid the city's glamor and extravagances in their most vital era as an aspiring artist, roaring boy, dandy, cultural omnivore, and far-from-obscure object of desire.

He will discuss the book and the heady days of the Seventies New York Art scene with his Editor, Gerry Howard at the White Hart Inn in an Oblong Books event on Thursday at 6PM in Salisbury, Connecticut.

Kristin Hannah’s best-selling novel “The Nightingale” illuminated the women of the French resistance in World War II. Her new novel “The Great Alone” focuses on fiercely independent women in extraordinarily difficult circumstances in Alaska who must fight each day to survive.

To have been alive during the last sixty years is to have lived with the music of Paul Simon. The boy from Queens scored his first hit record in 1957, just months after Elvis Presley ignited the rock era. As the songwriting half of Simon & Garfunkel, his work helped define the youth movement of the '60s.

On his own in the '70s, Simon made radio-dominating hits. He kicked off the '80s by reuniting with Garfunkel to perform for half a million New Yorkers in Central Park. Five years later, Simon’s album Graceland sold millions and spurred an international political controversy. And it doesn’t stop there.

Simon has also lived one of the most vibrant lives of modern times; a story replete with tales of Carrie Fisher, Leonard Bernstein, Bob Dylan, Woody Allen, Shelley Duvall, Nelson Mandela, drugs, depression, marriage, divorce, and more. A life story with the scope and power of an epic novel, Peter Ames Carlin’s new book - Homeward Bound is the first major biography of one of the most influential popular artists in American history. 

Kenneth Woodward edited Newsweek's Religion section from 1964 until his retirement in 2002. He remained a writer-at-large at Newsweek until 2009.

His new book is Getting Religion: Faith, Culture, and Politics from the Age of Eisenhower to the Era of Obama.

Beginning with a bold reassessment of the Fifties, Woodward’s narrative weaves through Civil Rights era and the movements that followed in its wake: the anti-Vietnam movement; Liberation theology in Latin America; the rise of Evangelicalism and decline of mainline Protestantism; women’s liberation and Bible; the turn to Asian spirituality; the transformation of the family and emergence of religious cults; and the embrace of righteous politics by both the Republican and Democratic Parties. 

  Jeffrey Toobin is a New Yorker Staff writer and is the senior legal analyst for CNN.

His new book is American Heiress: The Wild Saga of the Kidnapping, Crimes and Trial of Patty Hearst which revisits the famous kidnapping and the ongoing question of Hearst's motivations and loyalty in the 19 months that followed her abduction.

  A feminist, an outspoken activist, a woman without a college education, Midge Costanza was one of the unlikeliest of White House insiders. Yet in 1977 she became the first female Assistant to the President for Public Liaison under Jimmy Carter, emerging as a prominent focal point of the American culture wars. Tasked with bringing the views of special interest groups to the president, Costanza championed progressive causes even as Americans grew increasingly divided on the very issues for which she fought. 

In A Feminist in the White House, Doreen Mattingly draws on Costanza's personal papers to shed light on the life of this fascinating and controversial woman.

  Earth Wind & Fire, America's seventh top-selling musical group of all-time, was born in Chicago in 1969 and is still going strong in its fifth decade, making music that crosses years and decades and now connects the 20th and 21st centuries.

Inducted into both the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Vocal Group Hall of Fame, Earth Wind & Fire has earned eight Grammy Awards and four American Music Awards alongside numerous other accolades including the prestigious Soul Train Legend Award.

Verdine White of Earth Wind and Fire joins us now prior to their upcoming concert at Tanglewood.

Peter Frampton

May 31, 2016

  Lynyrd Skynyrd and Peter Frampton will be at The Times Union Center in Albany, NY (with special guest Jack Broadbent) on June 3rd.

Here, Joe Donahue speak with Frampton about his career; his seminal live album, Frampton Comes Alive!; and his relationship with David Bowie.

Delta Lady: A Memoir

May 12, 2016

  She inspired songs—Leon Russell wrote “A Song for You” and “Delta Lady” for her, Stephen Stills wrote “Cherokee.” She co-wrote songs—“Superstar” and the piano coda to “Layla,” uncredited. She sang backup for Eric Clapton, Joe Cocker, and Stills, before finding fame as a solo artist with such hits as “We're All Alone” and “(Your Love Has Lifted Me) Higher and Higher.”

Following her story from Lafayette, Tennessee to becoming one of the most sought after rock vocalists in LA in the 1970s, Delta Lady chronicles Rita Coolidge’s fascinating journey throughout the ’60s-’70s pop/rock universe.

  In Days Of Rage: America's Radical Underground, the FBI, and the Forgotten Age of Revolutionary, author Bryan Burrough offers an account of the decade-long battle between the FBI and the homegrown revolutionary movements of the 1970s.

Burrough digs deep to reveal the truth about what many call our country’s first “Age of Terror.”

Bryan Burrough is a special correspondent at Vanity Fair and the author of five previous books, including The Big Rich and Public Enemies

Miles Davis’s Bitches Brew is one of the most iconic albums in American music.

Fans have been fortunate in the past few years to gain access to Davis’s live recordings from this time, when he was working with an ensemble that has come to be known as the Lost Quintet.

In his new book, The Miles Davis Lost Quintet and Other Revolutionary Ensembles, jazz historian and musician Bob Gluck explores the performances of this revolutionary group—Davis’s first electric band—to illuminate the thinking of one of our rarest geniuses and, by extension, the extraordinary transition in American music that he and his fellow players ushered in.

  Girl Through Glass is the literary debut of Sari Wilson. It tells the story of a young girl's coming-of-age in the cut-throat world of New York City ballet - a story of obsession and perfection, trust and betrayal, beauty and lost innocence.

In the roiling summer of 1977, eleven-year-old Mira is an aspiring ballerina in the romantic, highly competitive world of New York City ballet. Enduring the mess of her parents divorce, she finds escape in dance the rigorous hours of practice, the exquisite beauty, the precision of movement, the obsessive perfectionism. Ballet offers her control, power, and the promise of glory. In the present day, Kate, a professor of dance at a midwestern college, embarks on a risky affair with a student that threatens to obliterate her career and capsize the new life she has painstakingly created for her reinvented self.

Sari Wilson will be in conversation with Darlene Myers of Northeast Ballet at Northshire Bookstore in Saratoga Springs on Thursday, February 25th at 6 p.m.

  The Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art at SUNY New Paltz will present a Hudson Valley sneak preview of the new documentary film Here Come the Videofreex this Wednesday - June 24th at 7 p.m. at the Rosendale Theatre, in Rosendale, N.Y.