The Roundtable | WAMC

The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

 WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9 a.m. to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge, Lin-Manuel Miranda and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org. Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

The Roundtable is also available as a podcast.  Subscribe today!

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10:50 - Congressional Corner
11:10 - Earth Wise

Book Picks lists are here.

Music played on the show can be found here.

You may also hear Composers DatebookPulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

Roundtable Music 11/4

Nov 4, 2020

Book cover for "Abe"
Penguin/Random House / Penguin/Random House

David S. Reynolds, author of the Bancroft Prize-winning cultural biography of Walt Whitman and many other iconic works of nineteenth century American history, understands the currents in which Abraham Lincoln swam as well as anyone alive.

His magisterial biography "Abe" is the product of full-body immersion into the riotous tumult of American life in the decades before the Civil War.

Book cover for "On All Fronts"
Penguin/Random House / Penguin/Random House

The recipient of multiple Peabody and Murrow awards, Clarissa Ward is a world-renowned conflict reporter. In this strange age of crisis where there really is no front line, she has moved from one hot zone to the next.

With multiple assignments in Syria, Egypt, and Afghanistan, Ward, who speaks seven languages, has been based in Baghdad, Beirut, Beijing, and Moscow. She has seen and documented the violent remaking of the world at close range. With empathy, Ward finds a way to tell the hardest stories. "On All Fronts" is the account of Ward’s singular career and of journalism in this age of extremism.

Congressman Peter Welch
Congressman Peter Welch's office / Public Domain

It has been a fall of extreme change for the U.S. Supreme Court.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont Representative Peter Welch wraps up his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

This conversation was recorded on October 29.

11/3/20 Panel

Nov 3, 2020
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

        The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, investigative journalist and UAlbany adjunct professor Rosemary Armao, The Empire Report’s J.P. Miller, and counter-terrorism expert and best-selling author Malcolm Nance.

Book cover for "Strangers in their Own Land" by Arlie Hochschild
The New Press / The New Press

In the days following the 2016 election, I [Joe Donahue] was drawn to a book published just as the fall campaign was getting underway. It helped me understand the election and the forces roiling in the country. The book was: "Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right" by sociologist Arlie Hochschild.

Almost a decade ago, she ventured into the Republican heartland, the state of Louisiana, and stayed there, on and off, for about five years. During that time, she grappled with what she called the "deep story" of voters who were determined to elect Donald Trump as their next president.

Four years later and a day before election day, I wanted to check in with her again. In what has become the most factious era of U.S. politics, I feel like I need help – help understanding. I called Hochschild and asked if she could join us to dissect what is happening within our nation. More accurately – what has happened, what is happening and what will happen – beginning with tomorrow.

Hochschild is Professor Emerita in the department of sociology at the University of California at Berkeley.

Congressman Peter Welch
Congressman Peter Welch's office / Public Domain

A new round of COVID-19 relief isn’t coming soon.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont Representative Peter Welch continues his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

This conversation was recorded on October 29.

11/2/20 Panel

Nov 2, 2020
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

      The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, political consultant and lobbyist Libby Post, Albany Law School professor and director of the Immigration Law Clinic Sarah Rogerson, and President and CEO of The Business Council of New York State Heather Briccetti.

Flag artwork from "The Perfect Weapon" film poster
HBO MAX / HBO MAX

“The Perfect Weapon” is a new HBO Documentary based on the best-selling book of the same name by New York Times National Security Correspondent David Sanger.

The film draws on interviews with top military, intelligence and political officials for a comprehensive view of a world of new vulnerabilities, particularly as fear mounts over how cyberattacks and influence operations may affect the 2020 U.S. election.

As news breaks this week about ransomware hitting the nation’s hospitals, there are also fears over vulnerable power grids, America’s nuclear weapons arsenal, and the global networks that are the backbone of private enterprise.

The film also explores how the US government is struggling to defend itself from cyberattacks while simultaneously stockpiling and using the world's most powerful offensive cyber arsenal.

David Sanger is a national security correspondent and a senior writer at The New York Times. In a 38-year reporting career for The New York Times, he has been on three teams that have won Pulitzer Prizes, most recently in 2017 for international reporting.

This interview was recorded as a socially-distanced conversation at The Brick House, the Presidential Residence of Bennington College on Wednesday, October 28.

Congressman Peter Welch
Congressman Peter Welch's office / Public Domain

The next round of reapportionment is coming up, but there’s not much to fear in the Green Mountain State.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont Representative Peter Welch speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

This conversation was recorded on October 29.

10/30/20 Panel

Oct 30, 2020
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock,  UAlbany Lecturer in Africana Studies Jennifer Burns, Former EPA Regional Administrator, Visiting Professor at Bennington College, President of Beyond Plastics Judith Enck, and Siena College Economics Professor Aaron Pacitti.

We are also joined, for a portion of the program, by Dr. James Fagin, MD, an Immunology & Allergy Specialist in New Hyde Park, New York.

Book Cover for "Voting in Native Country" - repeated thrice
University of Pennsylvania Press / University of Pennsylvania Press

Among the American public, there is a collective amnesia about the U.S. government's shameful policies toward the continent's original inhabitants and their descendants. Only rarely, such as during the Wounded Knee standoff in the 1970s and the recent Dakota Access Pipeline protests, do Native issues reach the public consciousness.

But even during those times, there is little understanding of historical context—of the history of promises made and broken over seven generations—that shape current events. Voting in Indian Country uses conflicts over voting rights as a lens for understanding the centuries-long fight for Native self-determination. Weaving together history, politics, and law, Jean Reith Schroedel provides a view of this often-ignored struggle for social justice from the ground up in her book "Voting In Indian Country: The View from the Trenches."

Book cover for "Future Rising"
Mango Publishing / https://mango.bz/

Human beings can and do change the future. Over the course of the past 14 billion years, humanity has gained the ability not only to imagine the future, but to design and engineer it.

In his new book, "Future Rising," Dr. Andrew Maynard, professor in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society at ASU, provides a highly original perspective on our relationship with the future. As a species, we have become profoundly talented architects of our own future. And yet, we so often struggle to come to terms with what this means and the responsibility that comes with this ability. As our world is driven along by the breakneck speed of innovation and rapidly-shifting norms and expectations, we sometimes need to find a still, quiet place to pause and think.

"Future Rising" sets out to create such a quiet place, where we can take advantage of our species' knowledge of the environment, world history, and the importance of science to piece together a positive picture of the future.

Artwork for "Typhoid Mary" at Barrington Stage
Barrington Stage Company / barringtonstageco.org

As the pandemic continues into its eighth month in the U.S. and an administration rails against the fact-based findings of doctors and medical advisors, the Barrington Stage Company is revisiting Mark St. Germain’s play, "Typhoid Mary," where arguments between God and science take center stage.

The virtual reading of "Typhoid Mary," a play by BSC Associate Artist Mark St. Germain, stars two-time Tony Award winner Judith Ivey as Mary Mallon aka ‘Typhoid Mary.’ The reading also features actors: Frances Evans, T.R. Knight, Kate Mac Cluggage and Joe Morton. The production is directed by Matthew Penn.

This is the true and turbulent story of Mary Mallon, known better as Typhoid Mary. As one of the most infamous women in America, her career as a cook left deaths in her wake. A carrier of typhoid, Mary refused to believe she was responsible, citing God’s will and the lies of science instead. Imprisoned on North Brother Island, the conflicts between her and the doctors were as impassioned then as they are today.

The reading will be available to stream on October 30 & 31 at 7:30 pm. Judith Ivey won two Tony Awards as Best Featured Actress in a Play for "Steaming" in 1983 and "Hurlyburly" in 1985. She was also nominated for "Park Your Car in Harvard Yard" in 1992 and a revival of "The Heiress" in 2013.

10/29/20 Panel

Oct 29, 2020
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

         The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Peabody and Emmy Award-winning journalist Linda Ellerbee,  investigative journalist and UAlbany adjunct professor Rosemary Armao, and former Associate Editor of The Times Union Mike Spain.

Book cover for "What Were We Thinking?"
Simon & Schuster / https://www.simonandschuster.com/

As a book critic for The Washington Post, Carlos Lozada has read some 150 volumes claiming to diagnose why Trump was elected and what his presidency reveals about our nation. Many of these, he’s found, are more defensive than incisive, more righteous than right.

In "What Were We Thinking: A Brief Intellectual History of the Trump Era," Lozada uses these books to tell the story of how we understand ourselves in the Trump era, using as his main characters the political ideas and debates at play in America today. He dissects works on the white working class like "Hillbilly Elegy;" manifestos from the anti-Trump resistance like "On Tyranny" and "No Is Not Enough;" books on race, gender, and identity like "How to Be an Antiracist" and "Good and Mad;" polemics on the future of the conservative movement like "The Corrosion of Conservatism;" and of course plenty of books about Trump himself.

Book cover for "Why Didn't We Riot?"
Penguin/Random House / https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/

South Carolina–based journalist Issac Bailey joins us to reflect on a wide range of complex, divisive topics—from police brutality and Confederate symbols to respectability politics and white discomfort—which have taken on a fresh urgency with the protest movement sparked by George Floyd’s killing.

Bailey has been honing his views on these issues for the past quarter of a century in his professional and private life, which included an eighteen-year stint as a member of a mostly white Evangelical Christian church.

His new book, “Why Didn’t We Riot? A Black Man in Trumpland,” speaks to and for the millions of Black and Brown people throughout the United States who were effectively pushed back to the back of the bus in the Trump era by a media that prioritized the concerns and feelings of the white working class and an administration that made white supremacists giddy, and explains why the country’s fate in 2020 and beyond is largely in their hands.

Issac Bailey is an award-winning journalist and the James K. Batten Professor of Public Policy at Davidson College.

Senator Chris Murphy
https://www.murphy.senate.gov/ / Public Domain

It hasn’t gotten much attention this cycle, but foreign policy is a key factor in the race for the White House.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Democratic Connecticut U.S. Senator Chris Murphy wraps up his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

This interview was recorded October 20.

10/28/20 Panel

Oct 28, 2020
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

 

     The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Edward Hamilton Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at RPI, Faculty Associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University and the Katherine Hampson Bessell Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University Fran Berman, Siena College Professor of Comparative Politics Vera Eccarius-Kelly, and Dean of the College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Cybersecurity at the University at Albany Robert Griffin.

Book cover for "Traitor" by David Rothkopf
Thomas Dunne Books / Thomas Dunne Books

David Rothkopf is an author and commentator who has written extensively on politics, power and national security. His new book is: "Traitor: A History of American Betrayal from Benedict Arnold to Donald Trump."

Exploring the actions of some of the most famous traitors in U.S. history, including Jefferson Davis, Benedict Arnold, and Tokyo Rose, Rothkopf looks to put Donald Trump into historical context.

David Rothkopf’s recent books include Great Questions of Tomorrow, National Insecurity, Superclass, and Running the World. He is a former senior official in the Clinton Administration and has taught international affairs at Columbia, Georgetown, and Johns Hopkins.

Book covers for books listed below on this page
thebookloft.com / thebookloft.com

      This week's Book Picks lists comes from Julia Hobart from The Bookloft in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. 

List:
"Killer, Come Back to Me" by Ray Bradbury
"We Keep the Dead Close" by Becky Cooper
"Black Sun" by Rebecca Roanhorse
"Ring Shout" by P. Djèlí Clark
"The Lost Spells" by Robert MacFarlane & Jackie Morris
"Everything Sad is Untrue" by Daniel Nayeri
"The Burning: The Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921" By Tim Madigan
"Unrestricted Access" by James Rollins
"Why Didn't We Riot?: A Black Man in Trumpland" by Issac J. Bailey

Online event: Saturday, November 7 at 4 p.m. - Noé Álvarez, author of the new book "Spirit Run: A 6,000-Mile Marathon Through North America's Stolen Land"

Senator Chris Murphy
https://www.murphy.senate.gov/ / Public Domain

Experts say masks work.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Democratic Connecticut U.S. Senator Chris Murphy continues her conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

This interview was recorded October 20.

10/27/20 Panel

Oct 27, 2020
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

      The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, investigative journalist and UAlbany adjunct professor Rosemary Armao, The Empire Report’s J.P. Miller, and former Associate Editor of The Times Union Mike Spain.

Book cover for "Biden"
Voracious Publishing / https://www.readvoracious.com/

David Lienemann was Joe Biden's official White House photographer for all eight years of his Vice Presidency, and like his former boss Pete Souza, David was granted unfettered access to Biden, which resulted in nearly a million compelling photos.

In both previously published and never-before-seen photos, his new book, "Biden: The Obama Years and the Battle for the Soul of America." shows the now-presidential candidate both in the public eye and behind the scenes.

David Lienemann is an editorial and lifestyle photographer based in New Mexico. He spent 8 years documenting visits to 47 states and 64 countries, making photographs of moments both grand and intimate. Before coming to the White House, Lienemann covered the 2008 presidential campaign for clients including the New York Times, Chicago Tribune, Associated Press, and Getty Images.

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