The Roundtable | WAMC

The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

 WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9 a.m. to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge, Lin-Manuel Miranda and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org. Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

The Roundtable is also available as a podcast.

Subscribe on Apple Podcasts Subscribe on Google Podcasts Subscribe on Spotify Subscribe on Stitcher

10:50 - Congressional Corner
11:10 - Earth Wise

Book Picks lists are here.

Music played on the show can be found here.

You may also hear Composers DatebookPulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

Movie poster for "Here Today" and book cover for "Laugh Lines"
provided

Alan Zweibel started his comedy career selling jokes for seven dollars apiece to the last of the Borscht Belt stand-ups. Then one night, despite bombing on stage, he caught the attention of Lorne Michaels and became one of the first writers at “Saturday Night Live,” where he penned classic material for Gilda Radner, John Belushi, and all of the original Not Ready for Prime Time Players. From “SNL,” Zweibel went on to have a hand in a series of landmark shows—from “It’s Garry Shandling’s Show” to “Curb Your Enthusiasm.”

In his new book, “Laugh Lines,” Zweibel weaves together the stories of his influential career, from writing for a generation of Jackies and Mortys and Dickies to meeting Gilda while hiding behind a potted plant.

Alan’s latest film collaboration, “Here Today,” starring Billy Crystal & Tiffany Haddish will be in theaters on May 7th. Alan is the co-producer, the screenplay for “Here Today” was co-written by Crystal and Zweibel, inspired by Zweibel’s short story entitled “The Prize.”

Book cover for "My Time Will Come"
Pantheon

The inspiring story of activist and poet Ian Manuel, who at the age of fourteen was sentenced to life in prison. He survived eighteen years in solitary confinement through his own determination and dedication to art until he was freed as part of an incredible crusade by the Equal Justice Initiative.

The United States is the only country in the world that sentences thirteen- and fourteen-year-old offenders, mostly youth of color, to life in prison without parole. In 1991, Ian Manuel, then fourteen, was sentenced to life without parole for a non-homicide crime. In a botched mugging attempt with some older boys, he shot a young white mother of two in the face. But as Bryan Stevenson, attorney and executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, has insisted, none of us should be judged by only the worst thing we have ever done.

The new book, "My Time Will Come" shows us the capacity of the human will to transcend adversity through determination and art—in Ian Manuel’s case, through his dedication to writing poetry.

Congressman Paul Tonko
Public domain / Public domain

New York’s House delegation is decreasing again.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Congressman Paul Tonko, a Democrat from the 20th district, speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

This interview was recorded May 3.

5/6/21 RT Panel

May 6, 2021
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Siena College Professor of Comparative Politics Vera Eccarius-Kelly, Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration Jim Hendler, and counter-terrorism expert and best-selling author Malcolm Nance.

cover for The Stephen Sondheim Encyclopedia
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

"The Stephen Sondheim Encyclopedia" is a comprehensive reference devoted to musical theater’s most prolific and admired composer and lyricist. Entries cover Sondheim’s numerous collaborators—from composers and directors to designers and orchestras—key songs—such as his Academy Award winner “Sooner or Later” (Dick Tracy), and major works including "Assassins," "Company," "Follies," "Sweeney Todd," and "West Side Story."

The encyclopedia also contains information about Sondheim’s mentoring by Oscar Hammerstein and his early collaboration with Leonard Bernstein, and profiles the actors who originated roles and sang Sondheim’s songs for the first time, including Ethel Merman, Angela Lansbury, Mandy Patinkin, and Bernadette Peters.

Rick Pender has been an award-winning theater critic since 1986. He is past chair of the American Theatre Critics Association and was the executive editor and publisher of "Everything Sondheim" and managing editor of "The Sondheim Review."

Book cover for "No Common Ground"
The University of North Carolina Press

When it comes to Confederate monuments, there is no common ground. Polarizing debates over their meaning have intensified into legislative maneuvering to preserve the statues, legal battles to remove them, and rowdy crowds taking matters into their own hands. These conflicts have raged for well over a century--but they've never been as intense as they are today.

In "No Common Ground: Confederate Monuments and the Ongoing Fight for Racial Justice," Karen L. Cox depicts what these statues meant to those who erected them and how a movement arose to force a reckoning. 

Congressman Antonio Delgado
Antonio Delgado, official portrait, 116th Congress / public domain

Upstate New York’s Congressional districts are big and getting bigger.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Democratic Representative Antonio Delgado of New York’s 19th district wraps up his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

This interview was recorded April 29.

5/5/21 RT Panel

May 5, 2021
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

       The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, investigative journalist and UAlbany adjunct professor Rosemary Armao,  Times Union columnist Chris Churchill, and Dean of the College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland and Cybersecurity at the University at Albany Robert Griffin.

Book cover for "This is the Voice"
Simon & Schuster

There’s no shortage of books about public speaking or language or song. But until now, there has been no book about the miracle that underlies them all: the human voice itself. And there are few writers who could take on this surprisingly vast topic with more artistry and expertise than John Colapinto.

Beginning with the novel and compelling argument that our ability to speak is what made us the planet’s dominant species, he guides us from the voice’s beginnings in lungfish millions of years ago to its culmination in the talent of Pavoratti, Martin Luther King Jr., and Beyoncé—and each of us, every day.

The name of the book is "This is the Voice."

Book covers for the books listed below on this page
provided - assorted publishers

Sharon Wienberg and Thomas Chulak from Chatham Bookstore in Chatham, New York join us with this week's Book Picks.

List:
Here Lies a Father by McKenzie Cassidy Burnt Sugar by Avni Doshi
Of Women and Salt by Gabriela Garcia
Exhausted on the Cross by Najwan Darwish
Hello World! by Kelly Corrigan illustrated by Stacy Ebert
Free Speech and Why You Should Give a Damn by Jonathan Zimmerman and Signe Wilkinson

Congressman Antonio Delgado
Antonio Delgado, official portrait, 116th Congress / public domain

American Rescue Plan funding is being distributed.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Democratic Representative Antonio Delgado of New York’s 19th district continues his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

This interview was recorded April 29.

5/4/21 RT Panel

May 4, 2021

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, investigative journalist and UAlbany adjunct professor Rosemary Armao, The Empire Report’s J.P. Miller, and former Associate Editor of The Times Union Mike Spain.

Book cover for "Can I Recyle This?"
Penguin Books

Since the dawn of the recycling system, we have stood by their bins, holding an everyday object, wondering, "can I recycle this?" This simple question reaches into our concern for the environment, the care we take to keep our homes and our communities clean, and how we interact with our local government.

Jennie Romer’s new book, "Can I Recycle This?" gives straightforward answers to whether dozens of common household objects can or cannot be recycled, as well as the information you need to make that decision for anything else you encounter.

Jennie Romer has been working for years to help cities and states across America better deal with the waste we produce, helping draft legislation to help communities better process their waste and produce less of it in the first place.

Book cover for "Letter To a Young Female Physician"
W. W. Norton & Company

In 2017, Dr. Suzanne Koven published an essay describing the challenges faced by female physicians, including her own personal struggle with "imposter syndrome"―a long-held secret belief that she was not smart enough or good enough to be a “real” doctor. Accessed by thousands of readers around the world, Koven’s “Letter to a Young Female Physician” has evolved into a new book - a reflection on her career in medicine.

With warmth, clarity, and wisdom, "Letter to a Young Female Physician" reveals a woman forging her authentic identity in a modern landscape that is as overwhelming and confusing as it is exhilarating in its possibilities.

Congressman Antonio Delgado
Antonio Delgado, official portrait, 116th Congress / public domain

President Biden has addressed a joint session of Congress for the first time.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Democratic Representative Antonio Delgado of New York’s 19th district speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

This interview was recorded April 29.

5/3/21 RT Panel

May 3, 2021
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

            The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, UAlbany Lecturer in Africana Studies Jennifer Burns, immigration attorney and Partner with the Albany law firm of Whiteman Osterman & Hanna, Cianna Freeman-Tolbert, political consultant and lobbyist Libby Post.

RTPWiR version of the Roundtable Panel graphic (mic in radio studio)
WAMC

 Each weekday morning, WAMC’s President and CEO and Political Observer, Alan Chartock, and Roundtable Host Joe Donahue are joined by various experts, journalists, educators, and commentators to discuss current events. 

On Roundtable Panel: The Week in Review, we feature your favorite panelists discussing the most important issues of the week, giving you a chance to catch up, ponder or reconsider.

Book cover for "Let's Talk Race"
New Society

"Let's Talk" Race confronts why white people struggle to talk about race, why we need to own this problem, and how we can learn to do the work ourselves and stop expecting Black people to do it for us.

Written by specialists in race relations and parents of two adopted African American sons, Fern Johnson and Marlene Fine, the book provides unique insights and practical guidance, richly illustrated with personal examples, anecdotes, research findings, and prompts for personal reflection and conversations about race.

Book cover for "The Lowering Days"
Harper

In his debut novel "The Lowering Days," Gregory Brown delivers an emotionally powerful saga, set in 1980s Maine, that explores family love, the power of myths and storytelling, survival and environmental exploitation, and the ties between cultural identity and the land we live on.

Congressman Joe Courtney
http://courtney.house.gov/biography/

Another election is on the horizon.

In today’s Congressional Corner, WAMC’s Alan Chartock wraps up his conversation with Connecticut Representative Joe Courtney, a Democrat from the 2nd district.

This conversation was recorded April 27.

4/30/21 RT Panel

Apr 30, 2021
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

        The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Former EPA Regional Administrator, Visiting Professor at Bennington College, President of Beyond Plastics Judith Enck, Vice President for Editorial Development at the New York Press Association Judy Patrick, and Albany County District Attorney David Soares.

"Pelosi" By Molly Ball

Apr 29, 2021
Book cover for "Pelosi"
Picador

Molly Ball is TIME magazine's national political correspondent and a political analyst for CNN. She appears regularly on PBS's Washington Week, CBS's Face the Nation, ABC's This Week, and other television and radio programs.

Ball's book, "Pelosi" is now out in paperback. The portrait takes readers inside Pelosi’s life and times, from her roots in urban Baltimore to her formative years as a party activist and fundraiser, from the fractious politics of San Francisco to high-stakes congressional negotiations with multiple presidents.

Book cover for "The Invention of Miracles"
Simon & Schuster

Joe Donahue: The "Invention of Miracles" is a biography of Alexander Graham Bell, a revisionist biography, if you will. While best known for inventing the telephone, Bell's central work was in Deaf Education. In fact, he considered his true life's mission to be teaching the deaf to speak. However, by the end of his life, he had become the American Deaf community's most powerful enemy, as he positioned himself at the forefront of the oralist movement. They oralist movement's aim was to teach the deaf to speak and extinguish the use of American Sign Language in the face of growing evidence that focusing on speaking orally often came at the additional expense of all other education, causing serious harm to brain development. Katie Booth is the author of the new book, "The Invention of Miracles: Language, Power, and Alexander Graham Bell's Quest to End Deafness."

Congressman Joe Courtney
http://courtney.house.gov/biography/

A tragedy in Indonesia has reverberations in the U.S.

In today’s Congressional Corner, WAMC’s Alan Chartock continues his conversation with Connecticut Representative Joe Courtney, a Democrat from the 2nd district.

This conversation was recorded April 27.

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